Monday, March 9, 2020 Headlines | Marijuana Today Daily News

Marijuana Today Daily Headlines
Monday, March 9, 2020 | Curated by host Shea Gunther

// Coronavirus thwarts plans for SXSW, two more cannabis events (Marijuana Business Daily)

// Utah’s First Legal Weed Dispensary Is Open, But Where Are the Patients? (Merry Jane)

// Virginia Lawmakers Send Marijuana Decriminalization Bill To Governor’s Desk (Marijuana Moment)


These headlines are brought to you by MJToday Media, publishers of this podcast as well as our weekly show Marijuana Today and the most-excellent Green Rush Podcast. And check out our new show Weed Wonks!


// San Diego lab says almost 80% of illicit cannabis vape cartridges are ‘unfit for consumption’ (10 News ABC San Diego)

// Magic Dragon name doesn’t fly with cannabis commissioners (Worcester Telegram)

// DEA Admits State-Level Marijuana Legalization Reduces Illegal Market Demand (Marijuana Moment)

// Rhode Island poised to triple number of medical marijuana dispensaries (Marijuana Business Daily)

// 50 State Banking Associations Demand Senate Vote On Marijuana Banking Legislation (Marijuana Moment)

// The Ripple Effect of Canopy Growth’s Move From Indoor Growing (Real Money)

// SEE IT: ‘Just glad to be alive,’ says man tackled by cops on Brooklyn street; police commissioner promises probe (NY Daily News)


Check out our other projects:
Marijuana Today— Our flagship title, a weekly podcast examining the world of marijuana business and activism with some of the smartest people in the industry and movement.
Marijuana Media Connect— A service that connects industry insiders in the legal marijuana industry with journalists, bloggers, and writers in need of expert sources for their stories.

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Photo: James Chutter/Flickr

Friday, March 6, 2020 Headlines | Marijuana Today Daily News

Marijuana Today Daily Headlines
Friday, March 6, 2020 | Curated by host Shea Gunther

// Boston’s First Legal Weed Shop Is Finally Expected to Open on Monday (Merry Jane)

// New York arrest video makes the case for cannabis legalization (Leafly)

// Oregon Activists Collect Enough Signatures For Drug Decriminalization And Treatment Measure (Marijuana Moment)


These headlines are brought to you by MJToday Media, publishers of this podcast as well as our weekly show Marijuana Today and the most-excellent Green Rush Podcast. And check out our new show Weed Wonks!


// New Michigan rule could increase business for cannabis growers (Marijuana Business Daily)

// Ontario Cannabis Store releases first annual report covering legalization (Marijuana Business Daily)

// Utah’s top medical marijuana regulator is stepping down (Marijuana Business Daily)

// Pot distribution charges dropped against man transporting hemp through state (Rapid City Journal)

// New Justice Department Memo Aims To Block ‘Habitual Marijuana Users’ From Buying Guns (Marijuana Moment)

// VI cannabis advisory board meets for the first time (Vibe High)

// Check Out Leaked Photos of Nike’s New ‘Strawberry Cough’ Sneakers for 4/20 (Merry Jane)


Check out our other projects:
Marijuana Today— Our flagship title, a weekly podcast examining the world of marijuana business and activism with some of the smartest people in the industry and movement.
Marijuana Media Connect— A service that connects industry insiders in the legal marijuana industry with journalists, bloggers, and writers in need of expert sources for their stories.

Love these headlines? Love our podcast? Support our work with a financial contribution and become a patron.

Photo: Daniel Chodusov/Flickr

Thursday, February 27, 2020 Headlines | Marijuana Today Daily News

Marijuana Today Daily Headlines
Thursday, February 27, 2020 | Curated by host Shea Gunther

// Vermont House gives initial OK to recreational cannabis sales, putting state on track to $160M market (Marijuana Business Daily)

// MedMen Reports Revenue Of $44 Million, But A Net Loss Of $96 Million (Green Market Report)

// Acreage Holdings Reports 2019 Revenue Of $74 Million, Net Loss Of $195 Million (Green Market Report)


These headlines are brought to you by MJToday Media, publishers of this podcast as well as our weekly show Marijuana Today and the most-excellent Green Rush Podcast. And check out our new show Weed Wonks!


// Canada Finally Surpassed $1 Billion in Total Legal Weed Sales (Merry Jane)

// Mexican President Wants Focus On Medical Marijuana As Senators Consider Broader Legalization (Marijuana Moment)

// Utah Medical Cannabis Program Set to Launch Next Week (New Cannabis Ventures)

// Nevada Publishes List Of Cannabis Test Failures (Green Market Report)

// Medical marijuana is third in revenue in Maine (News Center Maine)

// Maine currently has no recreational marijuana testing facility says state agency (WGME 13 CBS)

// Plans for Special Cannabis Crimes Unit Sparks Outrage (U.S. News & World Report (AP))


Check out our other projects:
Marijuana Today— Our flagship title, a weekly podcast examining the world of marijuana business and activism with some of the smartest people in the industry and movement.
Marijuana Media Connect— A service that connects industry insiders in the legal marijuana industry with journalists, bloggers, and writers in need of expert sources for their stories.

Love these headlines? Love our podcast? Support our work with a financial contribution and become a patron.

Photo: Don Goofy/Flickr

Thursday, February 20, 2020 Headlines | Marijuana Today Daily News

Marijuana Today Daily Headlines
Thursday, February 20, 2020 | Curated by host Shea Gunther

// Colorado Sold $1.75 Billion in Weed Last Year Exceeding All Expectations (Merry Jane)

// USDA Touts Hemp Industry’s Growth But Says Challenges Remain (Marijuana Moment)

// Alabama Lawmakers Approve Medical Marijuana Legalization Bill (Marijuana Moment)


These headlines are brought to you by Curaleaf, one of the leading vertically-integrated cannabis operators in the U.S. With legal medical marijuana dispensaries, cultivation sites, and processing facilities all over the United States, Curaleaf has served more than 165,000 medical cannabis patients and looks forward to helping many more long into the future. Swing over to Curaleaf.com to learn more about this very cool company!


// Virginia Marijuana Decriminalization Gets Closer To Governor’s Desk With New Amendments (Marijuana Moment)

// Most of Pennsylvania’s Medical Cannabis Patients Pay Over $200 a Month for Weed (Merry Jane)

// Is the Price of Legal Weed Going to Be Way Too Expensive in 2020? (Merry Jane)

// Legal marijuana use still costs people jobs. A new California bill takes on the issue (LA Times)

// New Utah Bill Lets Employers Discriminate Against Medical Marijuana Patients (Merry Jane)

// The buzz on Utah’s fledgling medical cannabis program (Leafly)

// At this high school apparently weed is okay- but only if you’re white (Leafly)


Check out our other projects:
Marijuana Today— Our flagship title, a weekly podcast examining the world of marijuana business and activism with some of the smartest people in the industry and movement.
Marijuana Media Connect— A service that connects industry insiders in the legal marijuana industry with journalists, bloggers, and writers in need of expert sources for their stories.

Love these headlines? Love our podcast? Support our work with a financial contribution and become a patron.

Photo: mrBunin/Flickr

The Four Basic Labeling Requirements for CBD Products

Last week, I attended Portland’s Hemp CBD Connex, an annual event that highlights the vast potential of hemp and CBD.

Of interest to me–because my practice focuses on the regulatory framework of CBD products–was a panel entitled “Weeding Through the CBD Jungle: How to Grow, Run and Be Successful.” This panel was led by two experienced industry leaders: Stuart Bennett, VP of Contract Manufacturing for Canopy Growth, and Alex Rullo, Executive VP of Strength of Hope. Both panelists discussed the dos and don’ts of selling and distributing CBD products in interstate commerce and stressed the importance of complying with the CBD laws of each state in which a product is sold. This was music to my ears!

As you already know if you follow our blog, the Food and Drug Administration (“FDA”) has taken the position that CBD-infused foods and dietary supplements cannot be lawfully sold or marketed in the United States. Yet, states have adopted their own approaches to regulating CBD products that are not necessarily consistent with the FDA’s current position.

Some states, including Colorado and Oregon, allow the manufacture and sale of all CBD products, including food, dietary supplements, smokable products, and cosmetic products. Other states, like Idaho, strictly prohibit the production and/or sale of any such products. A handful of other states, including California, have banned certain categories of CBD products (usually food and dietary supplements) but seem to take no issue with the sale of other products, such as CBD cosmetics.

In addition, some states that have legalized the sale of Hemp CBD products impose their own regulations, including but not limited to labeling and testing requirements.

As we previously discussed, CBD manufacturers and distributors selling their products in interstate commerce should familiarize themselves with labeling and marketing laws in each state where they plan on placing their products. As a rule of thumb, companies should adopt the most stringent rules, such as those imposed by Indiana, Texas and Utah, to ensure compliance across state lines.

While it’s impossible to cover all state labeling and marketing laws in one blog post, I thought I would provide a brief overview of the label components that have become standard in the industry:

The FDA’s General Labeling Requirements

Every state that authorizes the sale of CBD products also mandates, in one way or another, that the labels of CBD products sold within their borders be labeled in accordance with the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act (“FDCA”). Under the FDCA, the labels of any product sold in the United States must contain four basic elements:

(1) An identity statement, which indicates what the product is;
(2) A net weight statement;
(3) A list of all ingredients, which in states like New Mexico and Colorado, must clearly identify hemp and CBD. This requirement makes it difficult for companies that are steering clear from using the term “CBD” in an attempt to mitigate the risk of enforcement action. For more information on this issue, please read here; and
(4) The name and address of the manufacturer, packer or distributor along with their street address.

Scannable Bar Code or QR Code

A growing number of states are mandating the use or a scannable bar code, QR code link or web address linked to a document containing information, pertaining to:

  • the batch identification number;
  • the product name;
  • the batch date;
  • the expiration date, which in some states like Indiana, must be not more than two (2) years from the date of manufacture;
  • the batch size;
  • the total quantity produced;
  • the ingredients used; and
  •  certificate of analysis.
FDA Warning Statement

States like Colorado require that the following statement appear on CBD product labels: “FDA has not evaluated this product for safety or efficacy.”

No Medical or Health Claims

As we have discussed at length, the FDA has limited its enforcement actions against CBD companies that make outrageous and unfounded health claims about the therapeutic values of their products. Nevertheless, many states demand that the labels of CBD products sold within their borders be free of any health claims. It’s important to understand that drug claims don’t need to be explicit. If a company implies that its product can be used to treat a disease, the FDA and local authorities may conclude that the product is a drug.  Consequently, if a CBD company makes any medical, disease, or bodily structure or functional claims or implications about its products, the FDA will likely conclude that the company is marketing unapproved drugs in violation of the FDCA.

Ensuring compliance with the labeling and marketing laws (and policies) of each state in which a CBD product is sold can be challenging, yet it is a crucial step in mitigating the risks of enforcement action by federal and state agencies.

Utah Health Officials Say Medical Marijuana Program Will Have Slow Start

The slow-motion rollout of Utah’s voter-approved medical marijuana program hurdles forward, with health officials forecasting a limited launch in the coming weeks.

Marc Babitz, deputy director with the Utah Department of Health, told a group of state lawmakers Wednesday that only one or two dispensaries are slated to open in the first week of March, and that even then it will likely be difficult for patients to get a cannabis prescription.

That’s because Babitz said the number of physicians who have indicated they’re interested in recommending marijuana for patients is “very limited” — something he attributed to wariness over prescribing a drug that remains illegal on the federal level.

“I think this is actually much safer than a lot of the medications that we use,” Babitz said, as quoted by the Associated Press.

Medical Marijuana in Utah

Voters in Utah approved a referendum legalizing medical marijuana in 2018, making it the 33rd state to do so.

But the lead-up to the program’s March launch has been marked by delays and controversies. After voters approved the measure 53 percent to 47 percent, Utah legislators immediately began work on a compromise bill to overwrite the proposal approved at the ballot. The bill passed and was signed into law during a special session in December 2018, dramatically limiting the scope of the measure approved by a majority of voters only a month earlier.

Marijuana advocates challenged the bill in court, but the lawsuit was thrown out by the Utah Supreme Court in August. Justice Paige Petersen, writing for the court’s majority, ruled that while the state’s constitution “creates and protects the voters’ right to place legislation on the ballot for approval or rejection by the people, it also carves out an exception to that right.”

“When both houses of the legislature pass legislation by a two-thirds supermajority, that law is not subject to a referendum,” Petersen wrote. “Because this renders moot Petitioners’ argument about the constitutionality of the statutory referendum sponsor requirements, we do not address it.”

The law passed by the Utah legislature in December 2018 was designed to allow residents to use medical marijuana before patient cards are officially handed out, but only if patients could get approval from a physician; as Babitz said this week, finding a willing medical provider has been a tall order.

Earlier this month, health officials in Utah said they would award pharmacy licenses to 10 companies to dispense medical marijuana at 14 sites across the state, with some opening in March and others opening in the summer.

The post Utah Health Officials Say Medical Marijuana Program Will Have Slow Start appeared first on High Times.