The Danger of Synthetic Cannabis

On the potentially lethal subject of synthetic weed, the news, since legalization, is better, but still not great.

Though not wholly harmless, cannabis itself hasn’t killed anyone through overdose or misadventure. But cannabis prohibition absolutely has a body count. Between 2016 and 2019, at least 61 Americans died after exposure to synthetic cannabinoids, according to recent research conducted by scientists at Washington State University and published in the journal Clinical Toxicology.

Many more have become violently ill or wracked with disturbing mental or psychological trauma after using synthetic cannabis, with more than 64 percent of 7,600 documented exposures over that time frame requiring medical attention, the study found. (These figures don’t capture the full scope of the problem; synthetic cannabinoids are difficult to detect and use is often only detected after the user is in the hospital or the morgue.)

A broad term used generally to describe a range of potent chemicals, intended to mimic natural plant-based cannabinoids and to bind to many of the same receptors—but in some cases, up to 100 times more powerful; the difference in impact comparable “to the difference between a hose hooked up to a fire hydrant versus a faucet with a slow drip,” in the words of Dr. Patricia Frye, a Maryland-based physician and cannabis expert. “Synthetic cannabis” is banned under federal and most state law. (Plant-derived cannabis products created via chemical synthesis, including Delta-8 THC and Delta-10 THC, aren’t in this product category.)

Though not a priority for law enforcement, who still arrested hundreds of thousands of Americans for marijuana possession in 2020, synthetic cannabis is notorious stuff. Most often appearing in large cities, fake weed was the ultimate culprit behind a so-called “zombie outbreak” in 2016 in New York City, after several dozen people exhibited the same troubling dis-associative symptoms after smoking a particularly nasty “incense” product called “AK-47” Karat Gold.

Why would anyone use such dangerous and toxic stuff? And how can policymakers discourage such self-harm and solve what researchers described to Cannabis Now as a “serious health threat”?

The obvious answer will not shock you.

Nobody Really Likes Synthetic Weed, But…

Initially created in labs to understand how cannabinoid receptors work, synthetic cannabis was never intended for use in humans. And perhaps owing to the nasty side effects, synthetic cannabis use isn’t widespread.

Natural cannabis is far more popular. Even the estimated 0.2 to 0.4 percent of the population who do admit to using synthetic weed say they’d prefer natural cannabis.

However, there’s some societal “encouragement” for synthetic cannabis use: synthetic weed prohibition turns out to be difficult to enforce. Synthetic cannabis doesn’t contain THC. Users won’t show THC metabolites on a urine screening, and so drug tests can’t detect synthetic cannabis, the study noted. Thus, anyone in a position to want a buzz and avoid punishment for weed, including US service members, may decide that fake cannabis is worth the risk.

Users profiled in another recent study, from researchers based in Spain, confirm this ready common-sense explanation: Because drug tests don’t search for synthetic cannabinoids, meaning people worried about losing employment, housing, or other opportunities for a positive drug test are willing to risk serious consequences to achieve something like a weed-like buzz.

In other words, drug laws encourage drug users to risk great bodily and mental harm they wouldn’t otherwise risk. They say so themselves.

Synthetic cannabinoids “exist as a by-product of prohibition,” said Dr. Ethan Russo, a physician, neurologist and prominent researcher and author.

“Following the law of unintended consequences, the continued pervasiveness of urine drug screening for employment has stimulated the popular appeal of synthetic cannabinoids, which are not detectable on routine laboratory tests,” Russo told Cannabis Now. “The result is considerable attendant morbidity and mortality.”

In some places, this situation is getting worse. According to the researchers’ findings, published in the journal Frontiers in Psychiatry, “synthetic cannabinoids are increasingly gaining popularity and replacing traditional cannabis.”

However, that’s not the case in the US, where a simple and popular policy intervention leads to a decline in synthetic cannabinoid exposure (and related deaths and hospitalizations) of more than 37%. Only 5.5% of the synthetic cannabinoid poisonings tracked in the study occurred in states with legalization laws.

This magic public-health solution is allowing people to use cannabis safely and legally.

With Synthetic Cannabis, Legalization Saves Lives

As the Washington state researchers noted, synthetic cannabinoid exposures declined in the US starting in 2016—the same year that four states (California, Maine, Massachusetts and Nevada) legalized adult-use cannabis for adults 18 and over.

Of the exposures that were recorded, most–-56%–-occurred in states “with restrictive cannabis policies at the time of the exposure,” the researchers wrote. When a state passed a law with a more “permissive cannabis policy,” synthetic cannabinoid exposures reduced by 37%, they added.

This amounted to an “association” between “liberal policies (legalization) for natural cannabis and declines in reported synthetic cannabinoid poisonings,” they concluded. “This finding suggests a potential effect of policy change on substance use behaviors that may have long-term public health implications.”

Tracy Klein, the lead researcher and a professor in Washington State University’s College of Nursing, didn’t respond to a request for comment. But other experts, including Frye and Russo and Peter Grinspoon, a Boston-based physician and lecturer at Harvard Medical School, accepted the findings as a strong endorsement for cannabis legalization as a public-health intervention.

Synthetic cannabis harms people, but people don’t want to use it when natural cannabis is available. When natural cannabis is available, people don’t use it. Legalization saves lives. Could there be a simpler proposition?

“The rules of society have created this problem,” Russo said, “one that should no longer exist once a legal and regulated market for cannabis is established.”

“Legalizing cannabis, in the adult-use market, would certainly eliminate the need for experimenting with these potentially deadly chemicals,” Frye said.

The post The Danger of Synthetic Cannabis appeared first on Cannabis Now.

South Dakota Officially Regulates Delta-8, HHC, and THC-O-A

The whole cannabinoid issue has gotten more intense now that Shopify has banned anything that violates the law, likely at the behest of the US government. But in some places, it’s understood that regulating might be a better option than making these compounds illegal. Case in point: South Dakota through a new bill, now officially regulates cannabinoids delta-8, HHC, and THC-O-A.

South Dakota just passed a bill that regulates delta-8 and other cannabinoids by age. How the state will account for other issues of additives and processing has not been stated. We are an independent publication covering everything important in the cannabis field, and you can keep current by subscribing to the THC Weekly Newsletter. This will give you access to premiere deals on products like vapes, edibles, and other paraphernalia, as well as offers on your favorite cannabinoid products like HHC-O, Delta 8Delta 9 THCDelta-10 THCTHCOTHCVTHCP HHC, which are in our “Best-of” lists. Remember… *If you do not prefer to use cannabinoid products, we don’t advise that you do. There are plenty of products in the world of cannabis, and each person should only use what they are comfortable with.

What’s the deal with the cannabinoid market?

The cannabinoid market is an entire market that functions federally illegally at the moment, but under some marketing-pushed misconception that the products are legal. And to be fair, they’re not illegal based on their own dangerous capabilities, since none of the cannabinoids themselves have shown danger. They’re illegal simply because the government hasn’t legalized them, and because of this, a strange black market has opened, which, without regulation, has becomes a rather dirty market.

The cannabinoid market is rather new, coming into being as a side-effect of the 2018 US Farm Bill, which specifically legalized the cultivation and production of industrial hemp, and associated products. In order to do this, and separate said hemp from the rest of the world of marijuana, a new definition was instituted for hemp, which came with two main stipulations, though one is not as clearly outright stated.

The first is that all hemp plants, and associated hemp products, must not surpass .3% THC. And the second is that the only thing legalized, are products directly made from the hemp plant, since nothing synthetically-derived fits the definition of hemp. This was backed up by the DEA in regards to a question asked about synthetic delta-8 THC. In its answer, the DEA referenced the definition of hemp, with that definition being:

“The plant Cannabis sativa L. and any part of that plant, including the seeds thereof and all derivatives, extracts, cannabinoids, isomers, acids, salts, and salts of isomers, whether growing or not, with a delta-9 tetrahydrocannabinol [(D9-THC)] concentration of not more than 0.3 percent on a dry weight basis.”

Where do synthetics come in?

At no point does it say that synthetically-derived compounds are okay, and at no point does it say that a product can include hemp-derived compounds, but not be made completely from them. Thus, anything synthetically-derived, also doesn’t fit the definition, and remains under Schedule I. Why? Because synthetics of any Schedule I substance – or its analogues – (including THC), are also Schedule I, and therefore illegal, according to the Federal Analogue Act.

Why is all this talk of synthetics important? Because the cannabinoids sold are always synthetically made, even if its stated that they’re ‘hemp-derived’. This doesn’t mean that compounds like delta-8 and HHC aren’t naturally occurring, however, they occur in such small amounts, that rather than extract them directly from hemp, they are synthetically-derived from compounds like CBD. CBD and THC are currently the only two cannabinoids that exist in large enough quantities to directly use from extraction.

When it comes to compounds like delta-10 and THC-O-A, the ‘hemp-derived’ part is even more ambiguous, as these compounds are only synthetically made, and not found in nature at all. I should be clear here, ‘hemp-derived’ is being sold as a term that means ‘directly from hemp’, as this makes products fit under the definition of hemp. But what it actually means is ‘indirectly from hemp’, or ‘hemp parts used with synthetic processing’, and this no longer fits the definition.

South Dakota officially regulates delta-8 and other cannabinoids

There are two things to consider here. First, these cannabinoids have already created a widespread market. And though it’s a fringe market, it’s still there, online, as well as in brick and mortar stores. I say ‘stores’ and not ‘dispensaries’ because without regulation, these products are sold in tons of places outside dispensaries. The second thing to consider is that the cannabinoids themselves are fine, but the lack of regulation allows for seedy business techniques, dirty and mislabeled products, fake third party testing, and for chemical additives to be used that could be dangerous.

Which makes regulating the market, a much better idea than trying to backhandedly stop it through forcing sales platforms to stop selling products. This is what just happened with Shopify. Different states are making their own regulations for cannabis in general due to changing laws, and this new cannabinoid market is now factoring into new legislation.

delta-8 THC

In early 2022, The South Dakota House of Representatives initiated HB 1292 which is a bill that regulates cannabinoids delta-8 THC, HHC, and THC-O-A. The bill specifically seeks to set an age limit for sale and purchase of these cannabinoids, restricting anyone below the age of 21 from partaking. The bill doesn’t include anything else besides this idea of regulating their sale by age.

The bill, brought forth by republican representative Rep. Taylor Rehfeldt, first sought only to regulate delta-8, but was then expanded to include HHC and THC-O-A as well. An earlier bill in the session merely sought to outlaw these substances, but Rehfeldt introduced 1292 as an effort to responsibly regulate the substances instead.

Will it pass?

It did! After passing both the South Dakota House and Senate, the bill was signed into law by Gov. Kristi Noem on March 10th. Does this make all delta-8, HHC, and THC-O-A products legal to adults 21 and above? It’s hard to say, especially considering that the biggest issue in the field, is the question of regulating the actual products to make sure they are what they’re supposed to be, and to fit into laws regarding synthetics.

Bill author Rehfeldt admits that there’s more to be done in terms of regulating the industry. In regards to chemical additives, and to deal with these possible dangers, she states: “it will be important to address those issues with all stakeholders including public health, the hemp/marijuana industry, and the business community.” She stipulates that simply starting the process by setting an age limit, is a decent beginning measure.

Currently, the bill is very brief, only accounting for the age a person must be in order to buy these products. There is absolutely nothing in the bill that further regulates these products, or what’s in them. This promotes a lot of new questions. Like, are these compounds regulated the same way as regular cannabis? And, are synthetic versions allowed? And, if so, are there specific processing techniques that must be used? Without anything else said, it means South Dakota is literally promoting the dirty tactics of the cannabinoid industry, and offering no safety to consumers.

Into the future

I have yet to see anything further stated about how South Dakota plans to deal with this issue, though I do expect some sort of follow up. What’s weird about the whole thing, is why such a parse bill would be introduced, and then passed so easily. Perhaps this could be due to two different factors.

South Dakota regulates delta-8

First off, South Dakota legalized cannabis in 2020 via a ballot measure (54%), which should have included the state among 19 legalized states. In fact, South Dakota pulled double duty at the November 3rd elections, legalizing both medical and recreational cannabis with Measure 26, and Amendment A, respectively. In what I can only call a horribly corrupt tactic, South Dakota’s governor Kristi Noem conspired with local law enforcement to bring a case forward to invalidate Amendment A. They did this on the grounds that South Dakota only supports single ballot measures. The Supreme Court of the state backed Noem, and the legalization was taken away. Perhaps one reason for the new bill, is that blow-back from the removed legalization has inspired Noem to be a little looser if she wants to keep her seat.

The second thing to consider, is that these cannabinoids are based on hemp, even if they use synthetic processing techniques for the final product. This means the hemp industry wants the products to be legally available, because it spurs on the hemp industry. It has been reported that South Dakota wants to double its hemp-growing acreage, as well as to start fiber and seed processing within state. This is impressive considering South Dakota only legalized hemp production in 2020.

According to the USDA National Hemp Report for 2021, a total of 54,200 acres  of hemp were planted in the US, but only 33,500 acres were harvested. This is split into four categories: floral hemp (16,000 acres), fiber hemp (12,700 acres), grain hemp (8,255 acres), and seed hemp (3,515 acres). Hemp grown under protection is technically another category as well (358 acres). South Dakota came in 8th place with 1,850 acres planted, but had the highest harvest rate of any state with 1,700 of those acres harvested.

Of those 1,700 acres harvested, over 1,500 were dual purpose plants that can be used for both grain and fiber, which are harvested separately. South Dakota Industrial Hemp Association executive director Katie Sieverding used the report to ascertain that the value of South Dakota’s crop was $1,789,000 for grain hemp and $480,000 for fiber hemp in 2021.

When it comes to regulation, all hemp is regulated the same. And this is probably because, while there is differentiation in how the seeds are planted, and the processing methods after, all forms can produce CBD, except for seeds. So it’s quite possible that this new and growing hemp industry, also played a major role in South Dakota and its recent bill that regulates delta-8 and the cannabinoid market. A market which relies heavily on CBD, and therefore, hemp.

Conclusion

South Dakota is definitely promoting its newly won hemp industry, and the state is probably a little angry from having its voted-in recreational cannabis legalization taken away. How much these issues factor into South Dakota passing a law which regulates cannabinoids like delta-8, is hard to say. But the one thing for sure is, South Dakota certainly opened that door, and we can only speculate as to next moves.

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Disclaimer: Hi, I’m a researcher and writer. I’m not a doctor, lawyer, or businessperson. All information in my articles is sourced and referenced, and all opinions stated are mine. I am not giving anyone advice, and though I am more than happy to discuss topics, should someone have a further question or concern, they should seek guidance from a relevant professional.

The post South Dakota Officially Regulates Delta-8, HHC, and THC-O-A appeared first on CBD Testers.

Where Cannabis Synthetic Spice Came From and Is It Related To HHC?

Cannabis synthetic ‘Spice’ has been the center of controversy for many years, with government lines saying its highly dangerous, but its massive ubiquitous nature (and the lack of any real issues), saying otherwise. Where did this synthetic compound come from? And how is it related to cannabis synthetic HHC?

Cannabis synthetic compounds like HHC and Spice are available for those who want to try them, but users should beware of where they get their products from. On the other hand, plenty of companies are selling more above board products like delta-8 THC, which is a naturally occurring alternative to delta-9, which creates less psychoactive effect, and produces less anxiety, making it preferable for many people. Make sure to subscribe to The Delta 8 Weekly Newsletter for exclusive deals on Delta 8Delta 10THCV, and THCO, and to find out which THC is best for you.

What is HHC?

The reason I’m starting with the cannabis synthetic HHC, is because it happens to be the newest cannabis compound to make it to the public. In the last couple years, tons of cannabis compounds have made an appearance on the pubic stage, to varying levels of interest. For the most part, many of these compounds are found to be interesting, but haven’t done much to drive sales extensively. Some of this is probably because of shaky legal ground, and some of it is probably because the compounds themselves appear in small amounts only, and often require synthetization techniques that go far beyond basic extractions.

There are different kinds of compounds that have come to the public’s attention of late. Other delta-THCs like delta-8 and delta-10. Other cannabinoids like CBL, CBC, and CBN. And a range of synthetics like THC-O-Acetate, and now HHC. What is this last one? Well, it’s actual name is a long one: 9-Nor-9β-hydroxyhexahydrocannabinol. Quite a mouthful, huh? And it’s a synthetic cannabinoid derivative, which came from when THC was being studied early on, and modifications were made to its structure. The goal had been to find the simplest compounds that could still bind to receptors and produce a response. HHC is therefore a more simplified version of delta-9, and closely related to it.

HHC compounds have been studied a little, but not a huge amount is known about them. Interested parties can check out studies like this one to gain a little more info, but for the most part, very little exists in the medical world to speak of. This has not stopped the compound from being sold, although whether this is a good idea or not, is certainly debatable.

What is HHC and is it safe to use?

What is Spice?

Spice’ is a term to designate a synthetic cannabinoid, not unlike any other synthetic cannabinoid that we speak about on this site. Synthetics bind to the same receptors, creating essentially, the same response in users, which is often why a user won’t know if they’re using a natural compound, or a synthetic. Honestly, I’ve smoked plenty of black market vapes which I know were some kind of synthetic, and I found very little difference.

Since the majority of synthetics were designed off of delta-9, they act as agonists at receptor sites, meaning they promote a response. Sometimes, the synthetics have even stronger binding abilities than their naturally occurring counterparts. There isn’t just one kind of synthetic. In fact, there are several classes of synthetic cannabinoids that are given names based on structural attributes, though in the past they were named in different ways, often by the place where they were found.

If you’ll notice, none of this is specific to the term ‘Spice’, as ‘Spice’ is simply a name used to denote ‘synthetic cannabinoids’. Just like it’s other well-known name, K2. These are simply street names, and do not denote a specific synthetic necessarily.

What’s the connection between cannabis synthetic HHC and Spice?

So how is the synthetic cannabis compound HHC related to synthetic cannabinoids considered Spice? Good question. HHC was studied a bit when it was first found, and even went through animal testing which showed it to be a safe compound. However, it never caught on, and it never developed into any kind of pharmaceutical product. That might have been the end of the story, except that about 25 years after HHC was being studied, a derivative of it was found out on the street as the main ingredient in synthetic cannabis being sold.

This derivative, considered obscure at the time (though not so much now), is called cannabicyclohexanol, or (C8)-CP 47,497. Where did it come from, though? Was it made for the street specifically in some basement lab? Not at all. This compound was made by the pharmaceutical company Pfizer in 1979. In 2009, a German report came out saying that it had found an analog to CP 47,497, and that it was being used in an incense product called ‘Spice’.

Obviously, Pfizer never did anything with this compound, which isn’t terribly weird considering how many compounds were created and studied, just to be tossed aside, much like HHC. And much like synthetic HHC, it made a name for itself not by being used by the company that found it, but as a street drug. HHC was not found to be dangerous in testing, so the idea it wasn’t used for safety issues, doesn’t seem to be the case. And considering how widespread Spice is, and how few problems there are related to it, it also would appear to be generally safe, although the government has certainly put a lot of effort into having you think otherwise, probably because its a synthetic not being profited from by big pharma.

synthetic HHC

Are synthetics dangerous?

This is an interesting question, and requires a bit of critical thinking and general logic. Now if you ask the US government, it’ll tell you ‘yes’. Of course, the US government also likes to say that there’s an ‘epidemic’ of vape deaths, which actually only equals 68 confirmed deaths over nearly 20 years of time – which is laughable compared to the 480,000 that die a year from smoking cigarettes. If anything, their attempt to demonize vaping really only highlights what a safe alternative it is. In fact, the best the government has actually been able to do, is point the finger at vitamin-e-acetate and/or other additives, which don’t have anything directly to do with the cannabis plant.

Dealing with synthetics is similar. While the US government – and other governments around the world that bow to big pharma – like to go on about how dangerous ‘Spice’ and ‘K2’ are, and how synthetics are bad, it has no problem allowing synthetics that pharmaceutical companies profit off of. Perhaps the reason the Spice synthetic is so badly demonized, is nothing more than saltiness on the part of a pharmaceutical company that lost out on the profits.

There have been stories about people getting sick from synthetics like Spice. In 2016, about 70 people in Connecticut ‘overdosed’ on synthetic cannabinoids. Only, it had nothing to do with the synthetic cannabinoids, but, rather, the fact that the synthetic marijuana was laced with what they thought was fentanyl. Kind of a big difference. In the same year, about 300 people in the Washington DC area had a similar result. And this too was due to contaminated products. Now the thing about synthetics of this nature, is that they aren’t themselves plant material, but generally a liquid solution that can be sprayed on plant material to create a marijuana-like substance.

When I lived in Tel Aviv about 10-11 years ago, a synthetic dubbed ‘Mr. Niceguy’ became very popular. If it was really that dangerous, there would be an entire dead city, as we were all smoking it, partly because at the time, regular cannabis was hard to find. On the other hand, I myself had a very negative experience with another brand that came out a bit later, and which stopped me from using these products again. Basically, I got very sick from smoking it.

It could have been a pesticide, or fentanyl, or who knows what. Whatever gave me that reaction, was certainly not related to cannabis, either synthetic or regular. And that seems to be the case with most/all of the injuries mentioned, meaning just like with vapes, the danger issue has nothing to do with the cannabis plant, or the synthetics made from it. It also makes it highly unethical, and misleading, that the government publicizes big statements about the dangers of such compounds, when the danger has nothing to do with the plant. In fact, I have yet to see a complaint or death count associated with the actual plant, or the synthetics made directly from it.

More stories

In another story also from 2016, many people in New York had to be hospitalized after smoking a synthetic called AMB-FUBINACA, which was also made by Pfizer in 2009. It was somehow decided that this was because the synthetic had caused it to happen, since a metabolite was found in all the people hospitalized. And while it almost sounds like it could mean that this really was caused by a dangerous synthetic, it also happens to be that this particular synthetic, was the one most found in drug seizures in 2017, and part of 2018, indicating extremely wide use, and pointing to the idea that the New York issue was likely not about the synthetic cannabinoids, but something added in, like in the other cases. Otherwise, the New York story would have been an everywhere story, and it wasn’t.

smoking synthetics

In 2017-2018 there were also about 60 deaths in New Zealand, but once again, this wasn’t an ongoing issue, but something isolated in a specific time period, indicating once again that the issue related to specific batches, and not the synthetics. The same synthetics are still out there, so without added issues, it clears the synthetics of being the cause of the problem.

Does this mean a synthetic can’t be dangerous? Some might be, but it doesn’t look like that’s what has caused any issues thus far. If so, the problem would be more continuous, and not in isolated incidents in isolated locations. When someone cuts a batch of heroin with fentanyl and people die, it doesn’t mean all heroin will do that (although its also really not a good idea to do heroin). But what it does mean, is that that particular batch will cause problems to whoever uses it. This is the same concept. And much like in tainted heroin cases, the problem shows up in an isolated place, and then isn’t an issue anymore.

For me, the bigger concerns are making synthetics of compounds that don’t actually exist in nature, because then it becomes hard to know how it will behave in nature. And the idea that harsh chemicals could be used in the production of these compounds for which there is no regulation.

Conclusion

To me, one of the more interesting aspects of Spice, and cannabis synthetic HHC, is that they were created by pharmaceutical companies which chose not to use them, just to have them swiped out from under, to be sold illegally with no gain to the companies. I like to think of that as poetic justice for a pharmaceutical company. And in a sort-of coming full circle way, not only is Spice being sold out there, but so is its predecessor HHC.

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DisclaimerHi, I’m a researcher and writer. I’m not a doctor, lawyer, or businessperson. All information in my articles is sourced and referenced, and all opinions stated are mine. I am not giving anyone advise, and though I am more than happy to discuss topics, should someone have a further question or concern, they should seek guidance from a relevant professional.

The post Where Cannabis Synthetic Spice Came From and Is It Related To HHC? appeared first on CBD Testers.

What Is HHC (Hexahydrocannabinol) and Is It Safe To Use?

The race is on to discover and develop new, more potent cannabinoids. It seems like everywhere you look there are novel compounds, different types of THC, or various cannabis synthetics hitting center stage. For the most part, these compounds have been met with initial interest that eventually wavers, so longevity in these markets is questionable. The latest on the market is hexahydrocannabinol, or HHC,

Cannabis is the name and products are our game. If there are new products on the market, we always strive to be among the first to try them and write about them, so our readers can have a clear idea of what they’re getting into before making a purchase. Now that HHC is finally available, make sure to subscribe to The Delta 8 Weekly Newsletter for exclusive deals on Delta 8, Delta 10, THCV, and THCO, and to learn more about the industry.


What is HHC?

Honestly, the available information on HHC, scientifically known as 9-Nor-9β-hydroxyhexahydrocannabinol, is extremely limited and somewhat contradicting. Let’s start with whether it’s natural or synthetic: well, it can be both. There is a biologically active naturally occuring (−)-hexahydrocannabinol, as well as its synthetic enantiomer (+)-hexahydrocannabinol – the latter being what you’ll find in consumer products since natural HHC is only present in very trace amounts.

As the name suggests (Hexahydrocannabinol vs Tetrahydrocannabinol), HHC has many similarities to THC. It’s basically a simplified version of Delta 9 THC. Both HHC and THC have very similar molecular structures and comparable effects. It was discovered during research in the 1960s and 70s in which the goal was to find the most basic cannabinoid-like substances that could still bind to CB receptors.

HHC Vape Cartridges Sunset Sherbert
HHC Vape Cartridges Sunset Sherbert
(From the Delta 8 Weekly newsletter)

Very limited studies indicate that HHC has a decent safety profile in animal models and that it could have some medical potential, but we’ll get more into that a bit later. However, claims made by retailers regarding its legality and where it comes from are misleading at best.

What the Retailers Say

Let me start by saying that not many retailers are selling HHC yet. As a matter of fact, I’ve been able to find only three so far. All three of them have almost the exact same description on their sites for HHC, claiming that it is a naturally derived compound (found in cannabis pollen), extracted from hemp and federally legal.

I personally could not find anything to support the claim that HHC is found in cannabis pollen, or where exactly in the plant it’s found in highest concentrations. Also, what you’re getting in an HHC vape cart is a synthetic, as it would take way too much plant matter to extract a noticeable amount of this cannabinoid.

And because it’s synthetic, it’s also likely not legal. Because a version of the compound is naturally derived, that could fall under the industrial hemp legal loophole. The unnatural enantiomer of HHC is illegal because it is created using a chemical catalyst.

It’s important to remember that retailers might not always have all the information about rare and specialty cannabinoids. Their goal is to sell, so naturally, they will try to paint their new products in the most favorable light. This why you have to do your own research before trying new things, just because a statement is posted on a retailers website does not necessarily mean it’s true.

Best THC-O Carts: Top THC-O Vape Cartridges of 2021

Cancer Research

As far as HHC research goes, it’s nearly non-existent. However, both natural and synthetic cannabinoids have been found to suppress tumor growth in numerous different animal studies. One study in particular examined the angiogenic effects of several hexahydrocannabinol analogs to see how they can be used in cancer therapies.

As per the study: “Two analogs LYR-7 [(9S)-3,6,6,9-tetramethyl-6a,7,8,9,10,10a-hexahydro-6H-benzo[c]chromen-1-ol] and LYR-8 [(1-((9S)-1-hydroxy-6,6,9-trimethyl-6a,7,8,9,10,10a-hexahydro-6H-benzo[c]chromen-2-yl)ethanone)] were selected based on their anti-angiogenic activity and lack of binding affinity for cannabinoid receptors. Both LYR-7 and LYR-8 inhibited VEGF-induced proliferation, migration, and capillary-like tube formation of HUVECs in a concentration-dependent manner.”

HHC Vape Cartridges lucid blue
HHC Vape Cartridges lucid blue
(From the Delta 8 Weekly newsletter)

“The inhibitory effect of the compounds on cell proliferation was more selective in endothelial cells than in breast cancer cells (MCF-7 and tamoxifen-resistant MCF-7). We also noted effective inhibition of VEGF-induced new blood vessel formation by the compounds in the in vivo chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay. Furthermore, both LYR analogs potently inhibited VEGF production and NF-κB transcriptional activity in cancer cells.”

“Additionally, LYR-7 or LYR-8 strongly inhibited breast cancer cell-induced angiogenesis and tumor growth. Together, these results suggest that novel synthetic hexahydrocannabinol analogs, LYR-7 and LYR-8, inhibit tumor growth by targeting VEGF-mediated angiogenesis signaling in endothelial cells and suppressing VEGF production and cancer cell growth.”

Simply put, these compounds block the growth of the blood vessels that feed tumors, rather than blocking growth of the tumor itself. So, it basically works as an angiogenesis inhibitor that starves any tumors.

Final Thoughts – HHC

Again, since research on HHC is so limited on this cannabinoid, there really is very little for me to share with you all. However, since it is being sold online already, you will have to do your due diligence and make sure that the product you’re getting is safe and the company you’re buying it from is legit. Other than that, we will continue to make updates to this article as more information on hexahydrocannabinol becomes available, so check back periodically for more.

Thank you stopping by CBD TESTERS, your hub for all things cannabis-related. Remember to subscribe to The Medical Cannabis Weekly Newsletter for more articles like this one, and check out The CBD Flowers Weekly for exclusive deals on flowers and other cannabinoids.

Affiliate disclaimer: We work hard to find and verify the best products, so we may include affiliate links to support the maintenance and development of this site.

The post What Is HHC (Hexahydrocannabinol) and Is It Safe To Use? appeared first on CBD Testers.

High Potency: How THC-O Acetate Is Made

The question of how a cannabinoid is “made” does not come up very often. That’s because it’s usually pretty simple, they are “made” by the cannabis plant. However, there are a few compounds that are byproducts of phytocannabinoids and some other type of chemical catalyst… meaning they aren’t 100% naturally derived. THC-O Acetate falls under this category. So, how exactly is this exciting and very potent cannabinoid created?

The psychedelic THC-O Acetate sure sounds interesting, and goes to show just how many different products can be made from cannabis. Compounds like that one, THCV, Delta-8 THC and Delta 10 are the newer face of the cannabis industry. We support the expansion of cannabis use, and have some really great deals for delta-8 THC and many other compounds. Take a look at our selection, and join the cutting edge of marijuana use.
To get our latest deals on THC-O vape carts, and to learn more about THC-O potency subscribe to the Delta 8 Weekly newsletter, below:


What is THC-O?

In short, THC-O is an analog of THC, meaning is has a similar chemical structure but, as is the case in chemistry, minor differences often lead to substantial changes. THC-O is short for THC-O-Acetate, or THC Acetate/ATHC. Most of the time you’ll see it written and referred to as THC-O. It’s important not to confuse ATHC with THCA, the parent molecule of THC which found in raw plants that have not yet been decarboxylated.

In tetrahyrdocannabinolic acid (THCA) the A stands for acid, NOT acetate like with ATHC. THCA can be converted to THC-O, but THCA is a natural phytocannabinoid and THC-O is not. THC-O is a synthetic cannabinoid that can only be produced in a laboratory setting, preferably by an experienced chemist. With the rise of DIY technologies, it can be tempting to try and make THC-O yourself, but the process can be difficult and quite dangerous, so it’s best left to the professionals.  

Because it is an artificially produced cannabinoid, what you see is what you get – meaning all you get is THC-O and none of the beneficial terpenes and flavonoids that are found in natural oils. This is an obvious issue for whole-plant advocates and proponents of the entourage effects, but when it comes to pharmaceutical formulations, isolated cannabinoids are always preferred.

Best THC-O Carts: Top THC-O Vape Cartridges of 2021

The purity of these compounds means that 1 milligram of isolate equals measures out to exactly 1 milligram of cannabinoid, whereas 1 milligram of full-spectrum plant extract might have 0.5 milligrams of THC, 0.3 milligrams of CBD, and 0.2 combination of other terpenes and compounds. This makes isolate very easy to use for specific dosing and product production.

According to Serge Chistov, the inventor of Nanobidiol Technology, says his team has found a safe and efficient method to acetylate THC using only approved solvents. Chistov says his team “developed the analytical standard for testing for THC-O, as well as being in the final stages of introducing products to retail outlets.” So, if everything stays on track, we can expect to see THC-O therapeutics relatively soon.

THC-O Acetate: More Potent, Psychedelic and Spiritual Than Delta 9 THC

THC-O potency: Delta-9 THC vs THC-O

We already know that THC and THC-O are chemically similar, but that small variation in molecular structure translates to a huge difference in potency. While it may seem like a stretch, this is very common in chemistry – think CO vs CO2, the former being a manmade potentially dangerous substance, and the latter a natural gas required for plant and human life. Another well-known example is H2O vs H2O2, water vs hydrogen peroxide. Small molecular changes can make a world of difference.  

To be specific, THC-O potency is so high, that THC-O is considered to be three to four times stronger than Delta 9 THC. There are times when THC, despite how amazing it is, doesn’t seem powerful enough to accomplish the task at hand, especially when used for pain, digestive disorders, and other chronic health conditions. THC-O is not only much more potent, but our bodies recognize it as a completely different compound. This means THC-O can be used in place of Delta 9 THC if you have built up a tolerance.

Best THC-O Carts: Top THC-O Vape Cartridges of 2021:

THC-O Vape Cartridge Maui Wowie
THC-O Vape Cartridge Maui Wowie

“The prodrug [THC-O] enters the system as a Trojan horse. The body sees the horse, the body tries to destroy the horse, keeping the insides of the horse available for the body to process. This means the THC inside of the prodrug preparation will not be metabolized into 11-hydroxy-THC at the same rate and speed as the native THC molecule. That change in the metabolic perception of the body is what is partially responsible for the effect that most people describe as different,” Chistov explains.

Even recreationally, it has its place in the industry, and honestly, it sounds like a lot of fun. There is a huge market of people searching for cannabis products with more of a kick, which is exactly how concentrates came to be. It’s certainly not for everyone, but for people who like to experiment with pot products and psychedelics (myself included), it sounds like something worth trying at least once.

Those who have had the opportunity to try it claim that THC-O produces a much more spiritual, psychedelic, and introspective high than what they are used to from Delta 8, 9, or 10. Even habitual cannabis users noticed a difference. As a daily user, this alone has me sold, and I know many other people who feel the exact same way (hey subscribers, products will be available in our newsletter very soon!)

How THC-O is Made

Circling back, let’s talk a bit more about the THCA and THC-O connection. I have already covered the difference between the two (acid vs acetate), now it’s time to discuss how THCA can be converted to THC-O. Again, it’s a complex chemical process that should only be attempted by experienced chemists, this is NOT something that can be done safely at home.

In raw cannabis plants, cannabinoids are found in carboxylic acid from. Carboxylic acids are any of class of organic compounds in which a carbon atom is bonded to a hydroxyl group via a single bond, and to an oxygen atom by a double bond. When exposed to heat, the compounds lose their carboxylic acid groups and become the cannabinoids most consumers are familiar with.

Best THC-O Products
(Summer 2021 Edition)

New: THC-O Products
New: THC-O Products

Carboxylic acid and hydroxyl groups are both polar and hydrophilic, meaning small amounts of THCA (or any other cannabinoid acid) are water soluble. Using two chemicals – sulfuric acid and acetic anhydride – the conversion can begin. Summarized, the process goes like this: THCA + heat > D9 + sulfuric acid + acetic anhydride = THC-O Acetate. When THCA is converted to THC-O, the polar C-OH becomes C-O-CH2C=O-CH3. The carboxylic acid group is hydrolyzed by the heating with the sulfuric acid, which then reacts with excess anhydride to produce acetic acid. This acid reacts with regular THC at the hydroxyl group and becomes the potent THC-O-Acetate.

To reiterate, sulfuric acid and acetic anhydride are both very corrosive and hazardous chemicals that should not be in the hands of amateurs and everyday consumers. Attempting this process at home is incredibly risky.

THC-O Acetate Production – Final Thoughts

THC-O is such an interesting compound. Not only is it four times stronger than Delta 9, which as far as we know, is the most potent of THC’s, but it is so pure and had limitless therapeutic potential. You might be eager to try it, but since it’s too risky to make at home, your best bet is to check out some of the existing products the are just hitting the store shelves. For more articles like this one, and for access to exclusive deals on all the newest, rare cannabinoid products, make sure to subscribe to The Delta 8 Weekly Newsletter.

Want hemp flowers? Look at the best smokable hemp flowers

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One dollar THC threatens the future of the cannabis farmer — here’s why

Canopy Growth Corporation acquired a few old cannabis patents last year. One patent Canopy acquired was for the production of a synthetic variation of THC known as dronabinol. (1) Previously, it was understood that Dronabinol is too expensive to fit within the recreational cannabis market. Well, chemistry has made a few advantages that will be […]

The post One dollar THC threatens the future of the cannabis farmer — here’s why appeared first on Latest Cannabis News Today – Headlines, Videos & Stocks.

THC-O Acetate: More Potent, Psychedelic and Spiritual Than Delta 9 THC

THC-O gets very little attention in the cannabis industry and most consumers are probably completely unaware of its existence, but wrongfully so as it is many times more potent than Delta 9 THC and said to produce very uplifting and spiritual experiences. The purity, strength, and consistency of this compound could have several implications for both the medical and recreational markets.

The emergence of THC-O can take the world of cannabis into a whole new direction. However, we know way less about it than we do about delta-8 THC, another newcomer to the cannabis products market. Delta-8 is interesting because it functions much like delta-9 THC, but without producing anxiety and paranoia, or couch locking users. In fact, delta-8 is associated with a more clear-headed high and more energy in general, which makes it preferable for many cannabis users. Are you one of them? Check out our assortment of Delta-8 THC deals and order some today.

What is THC-O?

THC-O is short for THC-O-Acetate, or THC Acetate/ATHC. Most of the time, you’ll see it written as THC-O or ATHC. It’s important not to confuse ATHC with THCA. In tetrahyrdocannabinolic acid, or THCA, the A stands for acid (not acetate like with ATHC). THCA is the parent molecule of THC, found in raw plants that have not yet been decarboxylated.

THC-O is a synthetic cannabinoid that can only be produced in a lab. While it may be tempting to try and make some at home, the process can be volatile and dangerous, so it’s best left to the chemists. In short, THC-O is an analog of THC, meaning is has a similar chemical structure but, as is the case in chemistry, minor differences often lead to substantial changes.

Because it’s an artificially produced cannabinoid, what you see is what you get – meaning all you get is THC-O and none of the beneficial terpenes and flavonoids that are found in natural oils. This is an obvious issue for whole-plant advocates and proponents of the entourage effects, but when it comes to pharmaceutical formulations, isolated cannabinoids are always preferred.

The purity of these compounds means that 1 milligram of isolate equals measures out to exactly 1 milligram of cannabinoid, whereas 1 milligram of full-spectrum plant extract might have 0.5 milligrams of THC, 0.3 milligrams of CBD, and 0.2 combination of other terpenes and compounds. This makes isolate very easy to use for specific dosing and product production.

According to Serge Chistov, the inventor of Nanobidiol Technology, says his team has found a safe and efficient method to acetylate THC using only approved solvents. Chistov says his team “developed the analytical standard for testing for THC-O, as well as being in the final stages of introducing products to retail outlets.” So, if everything stays on track, we can expect to see THC-O therapeutics relatively soon.

The THCA to THC-O Conversion

Back to the THCA vs ATHC/THC-O. We covered the difference between the two (acid vs acetate), now it’s time to discuss how THCA can be converted to THC-O. Again, it’s a complex chemical process that should only be attempted in a professional laboratory setting, this is NOT something that can be done safely at home.

Carboxylic acid and hydroxyl groups are both polar and hydrophilic, meaning small amounts of THCA (or any other cannabinoid acid) are water soluble. Using two chemicals – sulfuric acid and acetic anhydride – begins the conversion process.

When THCA is converted to THC-O- Acetate, the polar C-OH becomes C-O-CH2C=O-CH3. The carboxylic acid group is hydrolyzed (forms water) by the heating with the sulfuric acid, which then reacts with excess anhydride to produce acetic acid. This acid reacts with regular THC at the hydroxyl group and becomes the potent THC-O-Acetate.

THC-O is 300 Percent More Potent Than THC

We already know that THC and THC-O are chemically similar, but that small variation in molecular structure translates to a huge difference in potency. To be specific, THC-O is about 300 percent stronger than regular Delta 9 THC (a 300 percent increase would be 4 the original value). It really makes you appreciate the tremendous impact of these tiny molecules.

There are times when THC, despite how amazing it is, doesn’t seem powerful enough to accomplish the task at hand, especially when used for pain, digestive disorders, and other chronic health conditions. THC-O is not only much more potent, but our bodies recognize it as a completely different compound, so although you may have developed a tolerance to THC, you can still use THC-O and experience the full effects.

“The prodrug [THC-O] enters the system as a Trojan horse. The body sees the horse, the body tries to destroy the horse, keeping the insides of the horse available for the body to process. This means the THC inside of the prodrug preparation will not be metabolized into 11-hydroxy-THC at the same rate and speed as the native THC molecule. That change in the metabolic perception of the body is what is partially responsible for the effect that most people describe as different,” Chistov explains.

Even recreationally, it has its place and definitely sounds like fun. There is a huge market of people searching for more potent cannabis products, which is exactly how concentrates came to be. It might sound intimidating to some, being considerably stronger than D9 THC, but for people who like to experiment with psychedelics (myself included), it sounds like something worth trying at least once.

Those who have had the opportunity to try it have state that it’s a much more spiritual, psychedelic, and introspective high than what they are used to from regular THC. Even regular cannabis users noticed a difference. This alone has me sold, and I know many other people who feel the exact same way (hey subscribers, stay tuned for when products begin to launch).

Final Thoughts

Although THC-O is very tempting and highly beneficial, you’re unlikely very many products containing this compound just yet. Some online retailers are selling THC-O vape carts and similar, but without knowing much about these companies it’s hard to say whether the products are legit or not. When it comes to cannabis, especially newer compounds, it’s best to stick to the most reputable retailers you can find. If you need guidance, you can always check with your local dispensary to see if they have any leads, although it is not guaranteed they will know where to find any.

Regardless, if you can find it, THC-O is a wonderful cannabinoid for both therapeutic and recreational purposes. The acetate version of THC can be helpful when the real compound doesn’t work as expected. And, since every human is at least slightly different biologically, some patients need different products to achieve the desired effect. “Because THC-O-Ac affects the receptors differently, the effect might be beneficial to people who might not receive relief from conventional THC or other formulations,” Chistov says.

As cannabis legalization measures continue to progress throughout the world, more will be available to us in both the recreational and pharmaceutical sectors. Once the research floodgates open up completely, we can look forward to some incredibly pure and potent cannabis products hitting the store shelves. For now, remember to check out or Delta 8 Weekly Newsletter for more articles and exclusive deals on legal psychoactive cannabinoids.

Thank you for stopping by CBDtesters.co, the #1 location for the most relevant cannabis-related news from around the world. Give the site a read-thru every day to stay on top of the ever-changing world of legal marijauna, and sign up to receive our newsletter, so you’re always in the know.

Resources

Exploring Raw Cannabinoids – What is THCa and What Can it Do For You?
It’s Not Your Parents’ THC – Welcome Cannabidiolic Acid Methyl Ester The Delta 8 Weekly Newsletter (All you need to know about Delta 8 thc), the Best Delta 8 THC Deals and the Best Delta-10 THC deals CBG, CBN & CBC: Benefits of the Lesser Known Cannabinoids
Delta 8 / 9 / 10 / 11… How Many THCs Are Out There? Extra Potent 11-hydroxy-THC and the Power of Cannabis Edibles
The Question of Delta-8: Recreational or Medicinal?
Delta 10 THC Disposables
What is Delta 10 THC & Does it gets you high?

The post THC-O Acetate: More Potent, Psychedelic and Spiritual Than Delta 9 THC appeared first on CBD Testers.

Who in the World Is Smoking Delta-8 THC?

One of the biggest new THC trends in the US, isn’t necessarily a global fad just yet, but that doesn’t mean it’s not on its way there. The US has been the starter for many cannabis-smoking trends over the years, and this happens to be the newest one. So, let’s take a look at who in the world is smoking delta-8 THC.

Delta-8 THC is becoming a very big deal in America, but who in the world is smoking delta-8 THC outside of the States? Well, a lot of people, but it’s still just spreading. And it’s definitely a trend worth checking out now. We can help you do that with some of the best delta-8 THC deals anywhere in the world!

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‘Hot Hemp’ Flowers – From $45/oz
‘Hot Hemp’ Flowers – From $45/oz

What is delta-8 THC?

The main question, is what is this delta-8 THC, and why is it anything to get excited about anyway? Delta-8 THC is a naturally occurring derivative of delta-9 THC, the standard THC associated with cannabis. Delta-9 THC doesn’t occur in large amounts in fresh flowers – a common misconception about cannabis. Instead, it’s precursor THCA, a non-psychoactive compound, is actually what is found in live plants. THCA decarboxylates into THC on its own by way of time and sunlight, but the process can be substantially speeded up by applying heat. In the process of decarboxylation, a C02 molecule is removed, creating the psychoactive delta-9.

Of course, we’re not talking about delta-9, we’re talking about delta-8 THC. When delta-9 THC comes into contact with oxygen, very small amounts of it oxidize to form delta-8 THC, making delta-8 THC a naturally occurring compound. The oxidation process involves electrons being removed, which actually ends up making delta-8 THC a far more stable compound than delta-9. This can be useful in terms of maintaining the composition of the molecule over longer periods of time.

Afghan Delta 8 Hash
Afghan Delta 8 Hash

Chemically, delta-8 THC and delta-9 THC are nearly identical. They both have the exact same chemical makeup of: C21H30O2, and the only actual difference is a double carbon bond, which is located in different places for the different compounds. For delta-9, it’s on the 9th carbon atom, and for delta-8, it’s on the 8th. Want to guess where it is for the synthetically made delta-10 THC? If you guessed the 10th atom on the chain, you’d be correct.

This minor difference doesn’t go unnoticed, although in many ways the compounds are more similar than different. Both delta-8 and delta-9 have been shown to help with nausea and vomiting, particularly associated with cancer and AIDS treatments, as well as appetite stimulation. Both have anti-inflammatory properties, have shown usefulness with neurodegenerative diseases and spastic disorders, and can benefit anxiety and insomnia issues.

In fact, it is here that delta-8 really shines, being associated with less anxiety and paranoia than standard delta-9, which makes it a better option for those who have issues with delta-9 anxiety. Delta-8 also supposedly produces a more clear-headed high than its counterpart, making it better for athletic activities. Another benefit for some, is that delta-8 THC comes with less psychoactive effect, which is beneficial for people looking for medical treatments, who don’t want to be out of their heads.

Is delta-8 THC illegal like delta-9?

This is a tricky question, and realistically, no matter how much its discussed and debated, there isn’t an official answer. There are a few things to consider though. And the first is that this debate wasn’t a debate at all, until the application of the 2018 US Farm Bill.

world delta-8 THC

Up until that bill, hemp production and manufacturing was illegal in the US, having been the product of large-scale smear campaigns, which, while actually focusing the attention of the population on the smokable aspect of cannabis, were really targeting the industrial hemp industry which threatened other large-scale enterprises, like paper industries (Hearst), plastic/chemical industries (Dupont), and as always, pharmaceutical industries, which are still fighting large-scale cannabis legalization today.

The 2018 US Farm Bill essentially reinstated an industry that had not only previously existed in the States, but which had been so important to the economy, that actual grow laws had been instituted back in colonial times, and by the time cannabis was illegalized, it was found in tons of medications on pharmacy shelves. The Farm Bill didn’t actually fully reinstate these things, but it did open the door for industrial hemp to be grown again, and for hemp products to be produced.

And that’s where delta-8 comes in. Delta-8 is a product of delta-9 THC, and can be sourced from any delta-9 THC, whether its in high-THC marijuana plants (.3%+), or low-THC hemp plants (.3%-). By using the THC in hemp plants, delta-8 THC can be synthesized within a legal loophole.

Hemp is defined as “the plant Cannabis Sativa L. and any part of that plant, including the seeds thereof and all derivatives, extracts, cannabinoids, isomers, acids, salts, and salts of isomers, whether growing or not, with a delta-9 tetrahydrocannabinol concentration of not more than 0.3 percent on a dry weight basis.” As a point of clarification – which also becomes important in this debate – this is referring only to naturally occurring derivatives, as it should be noticed that synthetic cannabinoids are not covered by this definition.

Synthetic cannabinoids never made it into the definition of hemp, and therefore remain under the definition of ‘tetrahydrocannabinols’, which can be found in DEA Controlled Substance Code Number 7370. As such, all synthetic cannabinoids, regardless of where in the plant they come from, what species of cannabis plant they come from, or in what quantities they exist, remain schedule 1 controlled substances.

In terms of delta-8, it is not technically synthetic, which makes it fall under the definition of ‘hemp’. On the other hand, it is naturally-occurring in such small amounts, that it must be synthesized with human processing help, which opens the door to it being considered a synthetic, which would illegalize it. As neither the DEA Interim Final Rule, or more recent USDA final rule, make any clarification on the definition of ‘synthetic’, delta-8 THC remains in legal gray area.

Delta 8 Moon Rocks
Delta 8 Moon Rocks

Who in the world smokes delta-8 THC?

Since it wasn’t a product to worry about before the last few years, not many countries have laws that specifically target delta-8, and many places, like the UK, also have contradictory laws that leave delta-8 in gray area, or mention it without giving any actual legality. As such, the question of who around the world smokes delta-8 THC is a strange question. A quick internet search will turn up plenty of online vendors for the product all over the world, but much like the early days of cannabis vaporizers, and edibles, the idea that something might be available, doesn’t mean it actually caught on.

Delta-8 THC is technically available in many places – at least as far as these online searches indicate. But there isn’t much evidence that the idea has taken off anywhere outside of the US. Or at least, not yet. There are questions being asked on reddit, which is always a good sign, and there are a few sparce articles from writers like myself in other locations – this too is an implication that its growing in the industry. After all, what we’re looking for, is it to be mentioned.

I got my first marijuana vaporizer back in the early 2000’s, and it was years before anyone else in the world cared about that. Just like, while it was more commonplace to deal with edibles early on in America, the idea only spread globally recently. In this way, the lack of global popularity of delta-8 THC is probably just about a lack of information about it, and the sheer fact that it hasn’t yet become the ‘next big thing’.

This doesn’t have anything to do with legalization either. Even in Canada, where cannabis is legal recreationally, delta-8 is not nearly as popular as America, and it can be seen in internet postings that there is still much confusion over what it is exactly, and where to get it. In fact, the main point of interest nearly anywhere in the world where a thread can be found on it, is about legality in that location. So in answer to the question ‘who in the world is smoking delta-8 THC’, the answer for now, is mostly Americans. With the growing mentions online in other countries indicating the buildup to a worldwide spread.

Conclusion

It can take time for some things to catch on. Especially when its legal standing is questionable, and it can’t be as easily self-made. However, the global illegal cannabis industry reminds us that regardless of illegality, things can definitely becomes popular worldwide. It will be interesting to see what happens with delta-8 in the future, if it becomes more popular, where that will be, and who in the world will be smoking delta-8 THC in a few years. For now, it’s mainly an American trend. However, America is quite the trend starter, and those trends tend to become pretty big everywhere in the world.

DELTA 8 THC VAPE CARTS - $10/CART
DELTA 8 THC VAPE CARTS – $10/CART

Hello and welcome! Thanks for stopping by CBDtesters.co, your one-stop-shop for all cannabis-related news from everywhere in the world. Pay us a visit every day to stay in the loop on the ever-exciting world of legal marijuana, and sign up for our newsletter so you’re always in the know.

Resources

Why Cannabis Edibles Don’t Work For Some People
The Many Faces of Tetrahydrocannabinol – Different Types of THC and Their Benefits

420 stories: The History of How 4/20 Came to Be
DIY: How to Make Delta-8 THC at Home
New Vaping Bill: Effective April 26th No More Mail Order Of CBD & Delta-8 THC Vape Carts
What is DELTA 8 THC (FAQ: Great resource to learn about DELTA 8THC)

Sparing 420, Vape Ban Goes Into Full Effect 4/27
The CBD Flowers Weekly newsletter (your top resource for all things smokable hemp flowers). The Legality of Delta-10 THC – Where It Stands. Best Delta 10 THC Deals.
Florida Bill Aims to Legalize Medical Magic Mushrooms

The Delta 8 Weekly Newsletter (All you need to know about Delta 8 thc) and the Best Delta 8 THC Deals. The Marijuana Conspiracy and the Strangest Experiment in Modern History
Delta-8 THC and Athletics – Why the Two Go Together
Delta-8 THC and the UK: Is It Legal?
Delta 8 Syringes, the Best Vape Ban Workaround
Delta-8 THC Exploits Fantastic Legal Loophole
Precise Cures – How Nanotechnology Enhances Cannabis Products
Despite Shifting Views, Cannabis Stigma and Discrimination Holds Strong

DisclaimerHi, I’m a researcher and writer. I’m not a medical professional, I have no formal legal education, and I’ve never been to business school. All information in my articles is sourced from other places which are always mentioned, and all opinions stated are mine, and are made clear to be mine. I am not giving anyone advise of any kind, in any capacity. I am more than happy to discuss topics, but should someone have a further question or concern, they should seek guidance from a professional in the relevant field for more information.

The post Who in the World Is Smoking Delta-8 THC? appeared first on CBD Testers.

The Legality of Delta-10 THC – Where It Stands

The internet is abuzz with talk of the newest THC to hit the market, delta-10, but unlike it’s more well-known THC alternative delta-8, the recent DEA Interim Final Rule and USDA final rule, have done nothing to increase the legality of delta-10.

The family of THC is growing, with newer version delta-8 THC becoming a rather big deal recently. Why? Because unlike delta-9 THC, it produces less psychoactive effect, and a more clear-headed experience. In fact, we’ve got some great delta-8 THC deals for you to try it out yourself.

When it comes to the legality of cannabis, and compounds like delta-8 and delta-10 THC, things can get confusing. While it seems there is much misunderstanding on the differences between the newest members of the THC family to make it to the public – delta-8 THC and delta-10 THC – there is one fundamental difference between the two which effects legality, and puts delta-10 in a different category.

Delta-8 THC does fall into the industrial hemp loophole according to some – though this is technically STILL up for debate, but delta-10 actually does not, and does indeed remain federally illegal. And it’s not unclear legislatively. Let’s take a look at why.

2018 US Farm Bill

First, let’s take a look at the legislation that brought delta-8 THC into the spotlight. Delta-8 THC is a naturally occurring, oxidized version of delta-9 THC, the standard THC of marijuana. What this means is that when delta-9 comes into contact with oxygen, small amounts (and we’re talking extremely small amounts), lose electrons, to form a slightly different, and more stable compound, delta-8 THC.

delta-10 vape

The delta number – 8 or 9 – refers to where the double carbon bond occurs on the chain, with it falling on the 8th atom for delta-8, and the 9th for delta-9. The most important takeaway so far? It occurs naturally on its own, and does not need to be made in a lab.

The 2018 US Farm Bill legalized the production of hemp products so long as the THC content is no more than .3%. As per the law, the definition of hemp is “the plant Cannabis Sativa L. and any part of that plant, including the seeds thereof and all derivatives, extracts, cannabinoids, isomers, acids, salts, and salts of isomers, whether growing or not, with a delta-9 tetrahydrocannabinol concentration of not more than 0.3 percent on a dry weight basis.”

Since delta-8 THC can be sourced from any delta-9 THC, whether it comes from high-THC marijuana, or low-THC hemp, it is legal according to the definition of hemp, landing it squarely in the industrial hemp loophole. Is it naturally occurring the way we use it? No, it’s not. Since the amount naturally produced by oxidation of delta-9 THC is miniscule, it does have to be produced through a processing method that involves human help. For this reason, some people stand on the side that delta-8 is synthetic, and that changes things a bit.

What is delta-10, and how is it different?

Though the name ‘delta-10’ is only becoming familiar to the public now, it was first discovered back in 1980, and this was done accidentally. It was found in California as a result of something completely unrelated – forest fires. The company Fusion Farms was in the business of making concentrates at the time, and its outdoor flower supply got contaminated by the flame retardant chemicals that were being used to avoid or subdue these fires. This all happened unbeknownst to the company workers who continued the process of producing the extracts.

What they found during this process, were unfamiliar crystals. The end result of the study of these new crystals, was that they were a new form of THC that had been synthesized, this time with the double bond on the 10th carbon atom.

What does this mean about delta-10? It means it’s chemically a derivative of delta-9 THC, but unlike both delta-9 and delta-8 THCs, it cannot occur on its own making it a purely synthetic cannabinoid. In this case, the synthetization process occurred by way of exposure to a catalyst, which was flame retardant chemicals.

As far as the effects of delta-10, it’s hard to say. Plenty of research has been done into delta-9, and there is a growing body of research being done on delta-8. But delta-10 hasn’t reached that point, so little can be said about exactly what to expect. The general thought is that it will hold the same basic qualities of its counterparts delta-8 and delta-9 – which themselves are very similar, but specifics really cannot be stated.

In terms of personal experiences, those are, indeed, difficult to find as well. In order to experience a product, it has to be available. In a new market, it can take time for word to spread, and for products to go out, be used, and for reviews and testimonies to make it to the internet. Right now, with the exception of scattered, not-very-specific mentions, there isn’t much to go on yet.

As time goes on, there will surely be a bigger supply of online usage information, but right now, products have not been circulating widely enough for this to happen. There is an issue that could effect how quickly it can be circulated though, as there is a legality issue with delta-10 THC, though this is not necessarily a deal-breaker in the end.

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Legalities – how delta-10 and delta-8 are different

One of the most important things to understand about the 2018 Farm Bill, is that it doesn’t cover synthetics. It just doesn’t. It’s super fantastic that it says that products can be made from hemp derivatives so long as the THC content is not more than .3%, but this only accounts for natural derivatives. According to the DEA Interim Final Rule, the definition of hemp is not changed, and the recently released USDA Final Rule, does nothing further to change definitions either. As such, right now legally,

“The [2018 Farm Bill] does not impact the control status of synthetically derived tetrahydrocannabinols (for Controlled Substance Code Number 7370) because the statutory definition of “hemp” is limited to materials that are derived from the plant Cannabis sativa L. For synthetically derived tetrahydrocannabinols, the concentration of D9 -THC is not a determining factor in whether the material is a controlled substance. All synthetically derived tetrahydrocannabinols remain schedule I controlled substances.”

The actual definitions of ‘tetrahydrocannabinols’, are materials “…naturally contained in a plant of the genus Cannabis (cannabis plant), as well as synthetic equivalents of the substances contained in the cannabis plant, or in the resinous extractives of such plant, and/or synthetic substances, derivatives, and their isomers with similar chemical structure and pharmacological activity to those substances contained in the plant…”

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This definition puts synthetics and non-synthetics together. And if you’ll remember, the definition of hemp, is for compounds directly sourced from the hemp plant. As the definition of hemp does not cover synthetics, all cannabis synthetics remain illegal federally as per the previously stated law.

As an only synthetically-derived cannabinoid, this squarely answers the question of the legality of delta-10 THC, making it strictly federally illegal. Why does this not entirely apply to delta-8 THC? Because delta-8 THC is naturally occurring. The current USDA ruling did nothing to clarify the legal loophole of delta-8, with some still saying because its naturally occurring, it’s legal, and others pointing to the processing necessary to create it, making it synthetic.

Right now, delta-8 remains gray area, but unless the definition of hemp changes to include synthetics, the legality of delta-10 is not as gray, and the compound doesn’t make it into the industrial hemp loophole.

The Legality Of Delta-10 THC – Conclusion

There you have it… delta-8 is still gray area depending on whether it gets defined as a synthetic or not. On the other hand, the legality of Delta-10, as a purely synthetic cannabinoid, is different, and the compound remains illegal on a federal level. Luckily, with a growing number of legalized locations throughout the US and the rest of the world, there are still plenty of markets that can legally sell this option. And since laws are still forming and kinks in this industry have a long way to being worked out (as evidenced by the new USDA ruling which does nothing to clarify delta-8 further), there should be plenty of ways to obtain this newer version of THC, for anyone who wants it.

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Resources

Finding the Balance Between Holiday Spirit and Commercialism this 420
Delta-8 THC Delivery Methods: Best Way to Get It in You

420 stories: The History of How 4/20 Came to Be
Delta 8 / 9 / 10 / 11… How Many THCs Are Out There?
New Vaping Bill: Effective April 26th No More Mail Order Of CBD & Delta-8 THC Vape Carts
What is DELTA 8 THC (FAQ: Great resource to learn about DELTA 8THC)

Sparing 420, Vape Ban Goes Into Full Effect 4/27
The CBD Flowers Weekly newsletter (your top resource for all things smokable hemp flowers). The Many Faces of Tetrahydrocannabinol – Different Types of THC and Their Benefits
Florida Bill Aims to Legalize Medical Magic Mushrooms

The Delta 8 Weekly Newsletter (All you need to know about Delta 8 thc) and the Best Delta 8 THC Deals. The Marijuana Conspiracy and the Strangest Experiment in Modern History
DIY: How to Make Delta-8 THC at Home Delta-8 THC and Athletics – Why the Two Go Together Delta 8 Syringes, the Best Vape Ban Workaround
Delta-8 THC Exploits Fantastic Legal Loophole MDMA – The New Way to Treat PTSD
Delta-8 THC and the UK: Is It Legal?

Weekly Delta 8 Deals
Weekly Delta 8 Deals

DisclaimerHi, I’m a researcher and writer. I’m not a medical professional, I have no formal legal education, and I’ve never been to business school. All information in my articles is sourced from other places, which are always referenced, and all opinions stated are mine, and are made clear to be mine. I am not giving anyone advise of any kind, in any capacity. I am more than happy to discuss topics, but should someone have a further question or concern, they should seek guidance from a professional in the relevant field for more information.

The post The Legality of Delta-10 THC – Where It Stands appeared first on CBD Testers.

Before It Even Took Off, Some States Already Want to Ban Delta 10 THC

Whenever a new cannabis trend emerges, we tend to get the same reactions every time: excitement from consumers and industry stakeholders, followed by a wave of legislation trying to regulate or prohibit the new product. Typically, by the time a product gets on the radar of the general public, it’s already on its way to becoming illegal.

Why ban the new Delta 10 THC? It happened with many cannabinoids and products already, most recently, Delta 8 THC. Despite the fact that it falls under a legislative loophole that makes it federally legal, technically; many states have completely outlawed its production and sale. And you might be inclined to assume that it’s only the most restrictive states taking these steps, but then you would be completely wrong. For example, some legal states including Colorado and Arizona don’t allow the possession or distribution of any products containing Delta 8 THC.

But we’re not here to talk about D8, today we’re discussing how this same exact dilemma is unfolding in the small but fast-growing Delta 10 THC market – which states are trying to ban this new cannabinoid?

To learn more about Delta 8 and Delta 10 THC, and for exclusive deals on vapes, gummies, flowers and other products, make sure to subscribe to The Delta 8 Weekly Newsletter


What is Delta 10 THC?

Following in the footsteps of many cannabis trends prior, Delta 10 THC was first noted in California, although in this case, the discovery was purely accidental. It all began when an Adelanto-based company called Fusion Farms bought some outdoor flower to manufacture concentrates. Because of the wildfire-prone climate in California, the biomass they purchased had been sprayed with fire retardant, although Fusion Farms believed the flower they were getting was pure.

Being unaware of the contamination, they continued with the extraction as planned but some unusual crystals began to form after the distillation process. These crystals had a completely different structure than previously observed cannabinoid crystals. After conducting some laboratory tests, it was determined that these crystals were most similar to CBC (cannabichromene), but still not an exact match. For several months, they continued testing this structure against all the known cannabinoids and no match was found.

Eventually, they found out that it was yet another variation of tetrahydrocannabinol, formed because of plant exposure to those fire retardants – dubbed Delta 10 THC. So basically, D10 is an artificial cannabinoid, formed by converting D9 or other cannabinoids using some type of chemical catalyst. In this case, it was fire retardant, but obviously that’s not something people want in their cannabis products, so companies are looking at various – greener – methods of creating Delta 10 THC.

In chemistry, “Delta” refers to the double bond in a compound’s molecular structure. Delta compounds have more electrons and interact with the body in different ways than single bond cannabinoids do. The variation between the Delta THC analogues comes down to where the double bond is located on their chain of carbon atoms. Delta 8 has this bond on the 8th carbon chain, Delta 9 on the 9th chain, and Delta 10 THC has the double bond on the 10th carbon chain. Although it seems miniscule, it makes a substantial difference.

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Is it federally legal?

Although all tetrahydrocannabinols are supposed to be on the FDA’s list of Schedule 1 narcotics, some of them remain permissible on technicalities. In short, if the THC (regardless of which Delta) was extracted from legal hemp, or chemically converted from CBD or another legal cannabinoid, then the THC itself is LEGAL.  

Since everything regarding Delta 10 THC specifically is a bit new, let’s once more take a look at Delta 8 for reference. Last year there was some controversy and confusion about whether Delta 8 would be added to the DEA’s list of controlled substances. Many in the industry believed it would be prohibited under the DEA’s Interim Final Ruling over “synthetically-derived” cannabinoids but, fortunately, this turned out not to be the case.

Although a few changes were made, the final result was this: if the end Delta 8 product is derived from hemp and has less than 0.3% Delta 9 THC, then it’s legal. The DEA does include Delta 8 THC on its list of controlled substances which was just updated in August 2020. But since the 2018 Farm Bill expressly exempts “tetrahydrocannabinols in hemp”, this means that any form of THC derived from hemp that falls within the already established limits will remain legal.

So yes, Delta 10 THC is federally legal… however, states can override federal laws if they choose to. It happens all the time with industries like alcohol, tobacco, and gambling. So, while Delta 10 may be federally legal, some states governments are already taking steps to ban the new THC.

What states are working on bans?

The Alabama Senate Judiciary Committee recently approved a measure that would prohibit Delta 8 THC and Delta 10 THC, along with Delta 9 which is already illegal. The original intent of this bill was to regulate a new synthetic opioid, Tianeptine, by adding it to the state’s controlled substances list. The bill was amended by Republican Senator Arthur Orr who added the sections about THC at the very last minute.

The Alabama Cannabis Industry Association starkly criticized the proposal in a blog post: “It’s premature to outlaw these potentially beneficial treatments for very serious conditions until research has been done. What we do know is that there have been no deaths attributed to delta-8-thc and cannabis is generally safer than even some over-the-counter medications. The Alabama Senate has the opportunity to regulate delta-8-thc and delta-10-thc in The Compassion Act so it is controlled but still accessible to people who will benefit from it in reducing suffering and improve quality of life.”

In North Dakota, not only did the Senate quickly shut down a bill that proposed legalizing cannabis, but a new bill that would outright ban the manufacture, sale and possession of ALL tetrahydrocannabinols (specifically Delta 8, 9, and 10) is quickly gaining traction. The governor has 10 days to sign the bill which would then go into effect immediately. If it passes (and it’s expected to), anyone found buying or selling products containing any type of THC could face criminal charges.

Final thoughts – Delta 10 ban

It’s hard to say what exactly will happen with Delta 10 THC on a national scale. So far, these are the only two states that I’ve heard of that are actively trying to ban Delta 10. It seems like a lot of wasted time and effort, considering anything with Delta 10 THC is difficult to find as it is, and all cannabis products will inevitably become legal in the very near future anyway (or at least we hope).

For now, the best thing you can do is stay up to date on your local news and laws, and make sure to stock up on your favorite products if you start hearing talk of new legislation.

Thank you for stopping by CBD TESTERS, your hub for all things cannabis-related. Don’t forget to subscribe to The Delta 8 Weekly Newsletter for more articles and exclusive deals on flowers and other products!

The post Before It Even Took Off, Some States Already Want to Ban Delta 10 THC appeared first on CBD Testers.