How Many States Must Change Cannabis Laws, Before Federal Government Is Invalidated?

The state vs federal government issue has been raging on in the whole cannabis debate, since states started breaking with federal prohibition. With 18 states now legalized for recreational cannabis, (and more on the way), the question now becomes, how many states must change their cannabis laws before the prohibition mandate of the federal government is invalidated?

How many states must change their cannabis laws before a federal government mandate can be invalidated? Hard to say, but luckily, this question does nothing to stop the burgeoning cannabis industry where it has already been legalized. And a growing industry means more and better options for you. Case in point, delta-8 THC. This alternate THC compound doesn’t produce anxiety like delta-9, and provides a clear-headed, energetic high. Preferable for many users. Check out our array of delta-8 THC, delta 10, THCV & THC-O deals, and be glad that the constitution does not actually prohibit cannabis.

Federal laws vs states’ rights

One of the tenants of the US constitution is that the federal government does not get full and complete power, and that each individual state has the right to ‘states’ rights’. These laws, enacted by individual states, do not have to match with the federal government, and can be in direct violation of federal law. The cannabis issue is one of the best high-profile examples of inconsistency between federal and state laws.

However, this doesn’t always hold, and we know this. If the US Supreme Court makes a ruling to legalize something like abortion, no state has the ability to illegalize it, though they can institute a lot of measures that make receiving one difficult. When looking at a subject like gay marriage, it almost looks like states can go against the Supreme Court ruling of 2015 which legalized gay marriage federally. Almost.

But a closer look makes clear that though many states still have outdated laws on their books – and refuse to change them – that these laws are not actually enforceable. That’s because the same-sex marriage law, much like the law legalizing abortion, came from Supreme Court rulings, not from legislative measures. This is how it works: the federal government has something called the Supremacy Clause: Article VI, Clause 2 of the US Constitution. It says:

federal government

“All Debts contracted and Engagements entered into, before the Adoption of this Constitution, shall be as valid against the United States under this Constitution, as under the Confederation.

This Constitution, and the Laws of the United States which shall be made in Pursuance thereof; and all Treaties made, or which shall be made, under the Authority of the United States, shall be the supreme Law of the Land; and the Judges in every State shall be bound thereby, any Thing in the Constitution or Laws of any State to the Contrary notwithstanding.

The Senators and Representatives before mentioned, and the Members of the several State Legislatures, and all executive and judicial Officers, both of the United States and of the several States, shall be bound by Oath or Affirmation, to support this Constitution; but no religious Test shall ever be Required as a Qualification To any Office or public Trust under the United States.”

This sounds weird, because we do have states’ rights…right? States’ rights are given in the 10th Amendment of the US Constitution, and are stated as follows:

“The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States respectively, or to the people.”

What this amendment actually makes painfully clear, is that individual states only have the ability for separate rights, if it doesn’t contradict with the Constitution. This is why when the Supreme Court makes a ruling, it must be followed, because the Supreme Court is a constitutional court, whose job it is to interpret the Constitution. Since a state cannot actually go up against the constitution, it must abide by Supreme Court rulings. This is also why, though many states still have laws against gay marriage, and even refuse to remove them in some cases, they don’t actually count for anything if someone wants to sue their state, because the 2015 Supreme Court ruling will back them.

Is cannabis in the constitution?

No, of course not! Not one mention is made to cannabis in the US Constitution, and realistically, at the time the Constitution was written, if cannabis was mentioned, it would likely have been to promote grow laws. There would have been a 0% chance at that time in history that a federal law would’ve been made to prohibit cannabis in any way at all.

cannabis laws

Cannabis is therefore not specifically ruled by the constitution, but simply by legislative measures. Measures that themselves, can be judged as either constitutional or unconstitutional by the Supreme Court. Should that ever happen, then whatever law coming out of it would be binding for all states. As of yet, that has not happened (with the exception of minor and highly indirect rulings which don’t make a full judgement on legality). Therefore, individual states have the ability to set their own independent cannabis laws, in spite of the US federal government ban.

So, what would happen if an individual case about the constitutionality of banning cannabis came to the US Supreme Court? If the court ruled that such a ban was unconstitutional, then every state would be obligated to allow recreational cannabis. If, on the other hand, the Supreme Court made a direct ruling saying that the use of cannabis is unconstitutional, then every state would be obligated to illegalize cannabis. None of this has happened yet.

How many states must change cannabis laws before a federal government mandate is invalidated?

So, now we know that the federal government does trump individual states so long as the law in question is backed-up by the US Constitution. And we know that anything not held specifically by the Constitution is up for decision by individual states. The question now becomes, with a growing number of states changing their legal doctrines to allow medical or recreational cannabis, or decriminalization measures (over 80% of the country), all of which go directly against the Controlled Substances Act of 1970, how many states must change their cannabis laws, before the federal government mandate of cannabis being illegal, gets invalidated. Basically, when does the federal government, have to give it up?

Can it be that all states legalize, and yet the federal government still says its illegal? Wouldn’t that make the federal government look incredibly weak if not one state was willing to follow its doctrines? I imagine at a certain point this aspect will be what changes things. The US government won’t want to look horribly weak, so at a certain point, its likely to change tack completely, and go in the other direction. Realistically, it will have to.

The Mexican example

At the end of 2018, Mexico’s Supreme Court ruled that cannabis prohibition laws were unconstitutional. This was based on a concept called jurisprudencia in which the legislative government is overridden by five consecutive Supreme Court rulings that rule in the same manner. When this happened, the Supreme Court issued a directive to the government to update the written laws.

After dawdling like babies and asking for multiple extensions over 2.5 years of time, the Mexican Congress finally dropped the ball completely at the end of April, 2021, and not only did not provide a law at the deadline, but did not ask for an extension, thereby allowing the Supreme Court the ability to officially change laws itself. And it did, on June 28th, 2021, the Court officially dropped the laws of prohibition against personal recreational consumption and cultivation, making Mexico the 4th legalized country.

mexico cannabis legalization

Why was the Supreme Court growing so impatient? Well, that’s automatically fair, because the government was meant to be doing a job that it wasn’t doing, but on a more practical level, if the Supreme Court can’t give a directive to the legislature, and have it followed, it erodes the power of the court. The Mexican Supreme Court had to legalize, to make sure it was understood that when it gives a directive, it must be followed.

This example is different from the US in that no Supreme Court ruling has been made in the US. Where they are similar, is in the idea of a government body being able to maintain control by having its laws followed. In Mexico, the Supreme Court ultimately dropped the prohibition laws because it had made a ruling that wasn’t being followed, and this threatened its power, and the power of jurisprudencia. In the US, the question is, at what point is the federal mandate invalidated by enough states going against it? With a caveat of, what does that do to the power of the federal government, if every state is against it?

While it could take longer for all states to adopt recreational policies, over ¾ have a recreational legalization, medical legalization, or decriminalization measure, all of which go against the US federal government. While medical legalizations and decriminalization measures are one thing, recreational legalizations really go right in the face of the US government in a more profound way. And there are plenty more on the way, making this a very pertinent question.

What’s the answer?

As far as I can tell, there isn’t a direct one, or at least, not one that’s outright and specific enough to be easily found in online research. I will put this question to constitutional lawyers, and see if I can offer readers a better answer in the future. It is quite possible that there is no specific measure to govern this, and that case law would actually have to be introduced to set some kind of boundary or limit, by which a federal mandate is invalidated by states not following along.

The thing to keep in mind, is Mexico, and the idea of a government, or government branch, not wanting to look weak. How weak would the US government look if every one of its 50 states and five territories enacted contradictory laws? And what could the federal government realistically do if it allowed anything to get to this point? How could it enforce its laws?

On the other hand, after upholding it for so long, giving in is a massive concession that comes with its own amount of hurt pride and general saltiness for representatives who have pushed so hard to keep these prohibition laws intact. Pride can be very destructive, and it can lead people to make bad decisions, even in the face of their own failure.

Conclusion

The question concerning how many states must change their cannabis laws before the federal government prohibition mandate is invalidated, is one that we’ll have our answer to soon enough. It’s quite possible it will simply come in the form of the government realizing at a certain number of states, that laws must change, and then allowing it to happen. It could come through a Supreme Court ruling. And, unless I find something to say otherwise, this could all come to a strange head if all states do adopt contradicting policies.

For right now, the federal government still has enough followers to keep the law how it is. In another five years, the same thing probably can’t be said. After a certain point, if the government wants to maintain its power (or illusion of it), it must legalize cannabis for recreational use.

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DisclaimerHi, I’m a researcher and writer. I’m not a doctor, lawyer, or businessperson. All information in my articles is sourced and referenced, and all opinions stated are mine. I am not giving anyone advise, and though I am more than happy to discuss topics, should someone have a further question or concern, they should seek guidance from a relevant professional.

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Tuesday March 9, 2021 Headlines | Marijuana Today Daily News

Marijuana Today Daily Headlines
Tuesday, March 9, 2021 | Curated by host Shea Gunther

// Mexico’s landmark cannabis bill one step closer to becoming law (Reuters)

// D.C. Can Take Steps Toward Legalizing Marijuana Sales Amid Congressional Ban Feds Conclude (Marijuana Moment)

// MindMed Finds One Investor For C$19 Million Offering (Green Market Report)


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// One-third of Canadian cannabis users consumed more during pandemic (Marijuana Business Daily)

// Marijuana Legalization Bill Has ’60-40′ Odds Of Passing Connecticut Governor Says Adding He’s Open To Homegrow (Marijuana Moment)

// Hawaii Governor Has ‘Concerns’ About Legalization Bill Advancing In Legislature (Marijuana Moment)

// Colorado Bill Would Require Schools To Store Cannabis-Based Medicines For Student Use (Marijuana Moment (Colorado Newsline))

// Pot advocates cry foul on Noem using state funds for lawsuit (Associated Press)

// Biden’s USDA Secretary Gives Final Approval To Hemp Rules Despite Ongoing Industry Concerns (Marijuana Moment)

// Scutari Sweeney working on marijuana home grow bill (New Jersey Globe)

Check out our other projects:Marijuana Today— Our flagship title, a weekly podcast examining the world of marijuana business and activism with some of the smartest people in the industry and movement. • Marijuana Media Connect— A service that connects industry insiders in the legal marijuana industry with journalists, bloggers, and writers in need of expert sources for their stories.

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Tuesday, February 9, 2021 Headlines | Marijuana Today Daily News

Marijuana Today Daily Headlines
Tuesday, February 9, 2021 | Curated by host Shea Gunther

// South Dakota judge strikes down state’s marijuana legalization vote (Leafly (AP))

// Virginia lawmakers pass landmark recreational marijuana legalization bills (Marijuana Business Daily)

// Schumer Hosts First Formal Meeting on Legalizing Weed as VA GOP Opposes Legalization (Hill Reporter)


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// Deadline for Murphy to Act on NJ Marijuana Bill Pushed Back (NBC Philadelphia)

// Lt. Gov. John Fetterman enters Pennsylvania’s 2022 Senate race (CNN)

// California Clears Up Confusion Over Marijuana Industry Coronavirus Vaccine Eligibility (Marijuana Moment)

// New Jersey Governor Signs Psilocybin Bill To Immediately Reduce Penalties For Possession (Marijuana Moment)

// Wisconsin governor proposes medical recreational cannabis legalization (Marijuana Business Daily)

// Marijuana concentrate sales up 40% as more consumers turn to the product category (Marijuana Business Daily)

// Legal Marijuana Is More Popular Than Joe Biden $15 Minimum Wage Or Rejoining Climate Agreement Poll Finds (Marijuana Moment)

Check out our other projects:Marijuana Today— Our flagship title, a weekly podcast examining the world of marijuana business and activism with some of the smartest people in the industry and movement. • Marijuana Media Connect— A service that connects industry insiders in the legal marijuana industry with journalists, bloggers, and writers in need of expert sources for their stories.

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EU Beat France, CBD Legal Throughout EU

In a high court ruling with far-reaching implications about EU governance vs member state law, the EU beat France making CBD legal throughout the EU, and setting a precedent for tons of cases in the future.

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What was the case originally about?

Before we get to the ins and outs of this landmark EU high court ruling, let’s look at the case that forced its way to the top of the EU judicial system. The story starts in 2014 when Sébastien Béguerie and Antonin Cohen were prosecuted under French law for marketing and selling a hemp-derived CBD vape product under the name Kanavape. France has very specific laws regarding the parts of a cannabis plant that can be used (only the fiber and seeds), and the amount of THC that can be in a product. The latter, in fact, is 0% as of 2018, which created an essential ban on CBD oil, since its nearly impossible to create a CBD oil without at least a trace amount of THC. France also doesn’t allow the leaves or flowers of a cannabis plant to be used for preparations of any kind, and the Kanavape product was made from the whole plant.

Béguerie and Cohen were importing and selling a Kanavape product that was made in the Czech Republic. Though this Kanavape product followed all EU mandates concerning the use and sale of CBD products, particularly the parts of the plant used, and a THC content that didn’t exceed .2%, it didn’t gel with French law which disagreed with the parts of the plant used, and the THC in the product. The two were found guilty.

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After the guilty verdict, the two men appealed their case, citing that the product they imported and sold was completely legal by EU law, and that EU law allows the free trade of products across EU member state borders so long as the products meet EU standards. In this case, they did, and in time it was eventually kicked up to the highest court in the EU, the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) in Luxembourg, which had never made a ruling on CBD legality before. Today, November 19th, 2020, the court gave its ruling.

The court was tasked with making a ruling with a lot of further implications. Within the world of CBD itself it would make it impossible for any member state to deny an import that meets EU standards, thus legalizing CBD in all EU countries. The second aspect is that as part of the ruling, the court also had to decide whether CBD itself is a narcotic, thus setting an EU standard for that as well, and forcing that standard on all member states. Last, through these decisions, the EU set a standard for the general trade of products – CBD or anything else – leaving a large space open for new litigation and legislation based on this new case law.

What was the ruling?

As per the title of the article, the EU beat France as the CJEU found that France was in violation of EU law by not allowing products to be imported into the country that meet EU standards. Along with this, the CJEU also made the ruling that CBD is not a narcotic, saying “It does not appear to have any psychotropic effect or any harmful effect on human health.” It went on to say, “The national court must assess available scientific data in order to make sure that the real risk to public health alleged does not appear to be based on purely hypothetical considerations”.

Together, the two aspects of this ruling force a CBD legalization across all EU member states, reinforce that products can freely be traded between EU member countries, and also reinforce a general foundational aspect of the EU, that EU law trumps individual member state law. This, of course, gives a major boost to the CBD industry which has been operating in gray area throughout Europe for quite some time; and a major blow to any EU country that was trying to ban CBD, like Slovakia, which will now also have to allow citizens to use CBD products.

CBD

What about synthetics and pharmaceutical products?

One of the interesting pieces of information to be made clear when the EU beat France in court, was that France had actually not banned synthetic CBD, only regular CBD – or plant-derived. Synthetic CBD is essentially the same thing chemically, but created in a laboratory instead of grown as a plant, and is the basis for a burgeoning synthetics industry, led mainly by pharmaceutical and biotech companies. This industry, in fact, threatens the actual CBD and cannabis industries. The overall lower cost of producing synthetics, over a cannabis plant industry that has grown more expensive through the instilling of infrastructure like regulation and taxation, has made synthetics much more popular. What this means is that France just spent years to fight two guys in court on the basis of selling an unsafe product, when it already allowed that same product to be sold, so long as it was made in a laboratory. Basically, France just fought a fight to allow the pharmaceutical version of CBD to be sold, while banning the plant version. Luckily, the EU beat France.

CBD Oil

But let’s take a closer look at the situation for just a minute. One of the pharmaceutical cannabis products that is allowed in France is Epidiolex, a CBD-derived drug put out by GW Pharmaceuticals. This is the same drug at the center of Italy’s current legislative contradiction. Within the past few months, Italy has had two different government agencies put out opposing mandates. The Agriculture Agency listed CBD as an agricultural product in July, making it freely available for use in tons of products. About two months later, the Ministry of Health decided to list CBD as a medicine, making it only available with permission from the Medicines Agency, thus making it illegal to sell CBD products. This came complete with a warning to providers to take products off of shelves.

This discrepancy was made that much more stomach-turning by the idea that Epidiolex was just about to launch in the country. So now that makes two countries that specifically put out mandates to curb CBD usage, while accepting the pharmaceutical version instead. And funny enough, it was June, 2018 that Epidiolex was approved by the FDA in the US, the same time France made the designation that CBD oil must have 0% THC, creating the essential ban. Maybe it was just a coincidence…

Does all this sound familiar?

The case of France vs the EU highlights the same general controversy that is currently going on in the US, and has been for years. The idea of individual states legalizing cannabis (either medically or recreationally) while it remains illegal by federal standards. While there does seem to be a general upward trajectory in terms of change, starting with the latest Farm Bill which legalized hemp products with a THC content of no more than .3%, this discrepancy between federal and state law has been causing many problems for years. In fact, up until partway through the Obama administration, the federal government was constantly at odds with legal smokers, often putting them in jail even though they were going by their own state’s laws.

court ruling

If the US did the same thing as the EU, it would mean that all 50 states would be required to bend a knee and accept the legalization. As of yet, it hasn’t happened, but the EU ruling might give some indication as to what might happen in such a situation.

Conclusion

The question of why France made the ban in the first place, and why the country was willing to go to such great legal lengths when it already was allowing a pharmaceutical version of the same thing to be sold, are certainly good questions to ask. In the end, GW Pharmaceuticals might be one of the biggest losers in this, and I certainly won’t be shedding a tear for their monetary loss.

CBD is now not a narcotic by EU law, and EU member states must abide by EU mandates concerning CBD usage since the EU beat France in court. All this is fantastic and moving in the right direction, but there is one more thing to consider. In two weeks, there will be a vote on WHO cannabis scheduling recommendations. How that vote goes could very well impact what the EU just decided today.

Resources

Forced Legalizations: EU & France Battle it out Over CBD Laws
Mexico Still Waiting on Its Promised Cannabis Legalization

German Cannabis Flower Market is Ready to Explode
The New Italian Cannabis Contradiction

South Africa Introduces Some of the Most Lax Laws on Cannabis Yet Newest Cannabinoid Powerhouse – CBC – What Can It Do for You?
What is DELTA 8 THC (FAQ: Great resource to learn about DELTA 8THC)

Legal for a Day – The Mahashivaratri Festival and Nepal’s Changing Cannabis Laws
Slovakia Is Only EU State to Ban CBD
The CBD Flowers Weekly newsletter (your top resource for all things smokable hemp flowers)
The Medical Cannabis Weekly newsletter (International medical cannabis business report)
What’s France Up To? New Cannabis Fines and Litigation Over CBD

The Delta 8 Weekly Newsletter (All you need to know about Delta 8 thc) and the Best Black Friday Delta 8 THC Deals 2020. Fly with Cannabis – Which Countries Let You Do It
Is Australia’s Capital Leading the Way for Legal Cannabis Down Under?

The post EU Beat France, CBD Legal Throughout EU appeared first on CBD Testers.

Will Mexico Become Biggest Legal Cannabis Market?

Uruguay started it as the first country to go cannabis legal. Canada was the second country to fall. While the US takes its time with infighting between parties and factions, Mexico is ready to sweep in and steal the show, poised to become the biggest legal cannabis market to date.

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It’s true that US states have also gone legal, but a minority of states don’t constitute a legalized country. What is most important about American cannabis legalization, is that America holds the single biggest legal cannabis market with California. This market may very well be eclipsed by the upcoming Mexican legislation that will bring Mexico into the recreational cannabis world.

But how will it really function? And how will it compare to the other legalized countries? Legalizations, after all, are not created equally, and every location has its own set of parameters, and its own structural setup.

A look at Uruguay

Uruguay cannabis

The first thing to know about cannabis reporting is that it’s not very good, anywhere. Numbers vary greatly in nearly every publication, governments don’t seem very excited to release decent information, and writers tend to focus more on long ranging predictions for the market which are so massively variant that it almost feels like they’re not all referring to the same thing. Any specific numbers about cannabis markets, legal or not, should be taken with a grain of salt. Having said that…

Uruguay certainly isn’t the biggest legal cannabis market, and its not in the running right now. Uruguay isn’t terribly concerned with having a massive free market trade when it comes to cannabis. In fact, the Uruguayan system is government run with set places where cannabis can be dispensed, maximum sale limits, and set prices that keep it cost effective. The last time the price was adjusted, it came to $1.23 per gram of flower (which is 53 Uruguayan pesos). About 70% of this amount goes back to producers, while the rest goes mainly to the pharmacy responsible for the point of sale and regulators. As of right now, all of the cannabis sold in pharmacies comes from only two producers – part of the issue for supply problems as these companies have not produced the required amount.

Uruguay had specifically wanted to chip away at the cannabis black market, which is the basis for a system with set (and low) pricing. To anyone not fully paying attention, it means Uruguay sells top quality cannabis, at approximately $4.30 per 1/8th. This greatly breaks the standard price point which globally puts 1/8th of good cannabis at about $50, give or take $10.

Uruguay’s market doesn’t move as quickly as that of Canada or the US states, likely because it doesn’t leave room for huge profits, or corporate manipulation. On the other hand, it’s a much stricter system which makes it harder to actually obtain marijuana. Uruguay has suffered from supply issues since cultivation of marijuana for recreational use is strictly monitored, and only currently allowed by two entities.

Uruguay started its program back in July of 2017, and since its inception up until February of 2020, just under 4,000 kilograms have been sold. This according to the (IRCCA) Institute for the Regulation and Control of Cannabis. More than half of this amount was sold in the capital city of Montevideo. It’s expected that sales would’ve been higher had Uruguay not fallen prey to supply issues.

A look at Canada & the US

Canada was the second country to fully go all-in with cannabis legalization, officially legalizing it in October 2018. Canada has a completely different set-up from Uruguay, offering a free market system where individual businesses can receive licenses to sell cannabis products. Products are priced however manufacturers feel like pricing them, and then duly taxed by the government, either just federally, or locally and federally as well. Based on sales statistics from May of this year, the annual revenue for recreational cannabis in Canada is approximately $1.6 billion. In comparison, Uruguay sold about 4,000 kg over three years, with the last price of $1.23. This makes for approximately $4.9 million. This is obviously a huge difference, and highlights the discrepancy between a free market and a government run system.

Canada cannabis

The US States operate like Canada, offering free markets where cannabis has been legalized, with no set price point (or max price), and the ability for massive government taxes to be added on. In the US, California is the biggest cannabis state, pulling in approximately $3.1 billion in 2019 – though some publications cite this as both medical and recreational together, with very little good information to verify. What does appear true, is that this well surpasses every other legal state (the next was Colorado with $1.6 billion), Canada, and Uruguay, to be the highest grossing single cannabis market.

Does it matter what Mexico does?

These two systems are entirely different in how they operate. One provides a steadier system that can’t be inflated or abused as easily, but comes with drawbacks including supply issues. The other has no real limit in terms of what can be charged or earned, but comes with the drawback of raised price points, and less ability to divert from black markets. So, when looking at Mexico, there are a few things to consider.

I’ve been in Guadalajara for three months now, and while I won’t consider myself an authority on weed here, I’ve certainly learned a bit about how it works. There’s a big different between 1st world and 3rd world countries when it comes to price and quality. Technically the price point for standard ‘good’ weed is about the same, although I have yet to actually buy to the standard that I have in the past. And that’s because it’s not easy to find good pot in Mexico. Most of the Mexicans I’ve encountered don’t even know that the bad smelling, seedy mess they’re smoking is a much lesser form of cannabis in general.

We know from Uruguay that it’s more than possible to provide quality cannabis at an affordable price. Maybe if Uruguay hadn’t legalized first, we might not have known that. I’ve always taken that standard $50 per 1/8th as a general benchmark, and it’s about what I paid in Mexico when I finally found something better than the standard. But Uruguay forces a new question…can the standard price of cannabis be lowered, while still maintaining quality? And if Uruguay can manage it, why is anyone paying anything else??

Mexico’s plans…

It doesn’t look like Mexico is aiming for a government run program. In July of 2020, Mexico released yet more draft legislation from the Secretary of Health regarding its progress in legislation to legalize, which is scheduled to be finalized by December 15th (after several postponements). Mexico technically legalized cannabis judicially when five supreme court rulings were made in favor of legalization. For the past two years, the country has been waiting for its legislative system to catch up, and provide the legal framework made necessary by the court rulings. When court rulings are able to effect legislation in this way, it’s called jurisprudencia.

USA cannabis

Right now, a couple of the issues causing the most concern are how accessible to make cannabis, and whether or not to protect the current 200,000 growers from competition from foreign firms. In a free market, local growers are often made illegitimate by large corporate firms, and that can have devastating effects on local citizens. As of right now, a bill waiting to clear the senate would allow for private companies to sell to the public. One of the points of activist groups is that released draft legislation has easily favored big business over small local growers. Other stipulations not included in previous draft legislation include limits for personal growing, and the need for obtaining a license from the government to smoke.

Implications

Right now, in the US, it’s being summarily discovered that if you raise the price of a good beyond a standard and appreciated price point – especially when said product is still easily available in the black market – you won’t be able to divert as much from said black market. In the US and Canada, people are used to paying more, and a certain percentage are even willing to pay inflated dispensary prices. But plenty aren’t, and that’s not even Mexico.

To give an idea, one USD is worth approximately 21 pesos. If anyone wants to wager a guess on how likely anyone in this economy is to be spending standard dispensary prices, go for it. My guess is, not so much. Which raises the question, will Mexico really be serving up high grade marijuana at prices a Mexican can afford?? After all, it raises prices to have regulation, and taxes, without even getting into company profits. How will these companies provide a better product than what’s already the norm, but without going above what the average person would pay for it? In a government run system this is way less of an issue, in a free market system, which Mexico is aiming for, it can mean totally out-of-whack prices, and the failure of a legal market.

Will Mexico Become Biggest Legal Cannabis Market? Conclusion

It’s hard to have faith in this going well. I can’t imagine the same kind of dispensary setup making it here outside of those already rich enough to buy off the menu services that populate the area. The menu services are chock full of high-quality options, geared mainly toward the Americans in Mexico, and those who pull in enough income to make the high cost worthwhile. I haven’t found a Mexican yet who uses them.

So, we’ll see. As the date comes nearer for the legislation to be turned in, I wait, along with the rest of Mexico, to see what comes next. Hopefully in the next few months, it’ll become a standard in Mexico to smoke better cannabis. Otherwise…it’ll just be business as usual. Regardless of whether actual targets are met, with a population of 128 million, Mexico is likely to become the biggest legal cannabis market once legislation is finally passed.

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Resources

Synthetic Cannabinoids (Are they synthetic cannabinoids safe?)
Everything You Need To Know About CBD Isolate (a deep look into hemp extracts)

German Cannabis Flower Market is Ready to Explode
Delta-8 THC Contaminated Products, or Just Bad Press?

Government Assistance Options for U.S. Hemp Farmers Affected By COVID-19
Newest Cannabinoid Powerhouse – CBC – What Can It Do for You?
Cannabinoids 101 – Spotlight on CBN (Cannabinol)

Cannabis Cosmetics: What’s Allowed, What’s Not, and Where to Find Them (What is the latest regulations in Europe and which products are allowed)
CBG Study Shows Antimicrobial Properties of Cannabis
The CBD Flowers Weekly newsletter (your top resource for all things smokable hemp flowers)
The Medical Cannabis Weekly newsletter (International medical cannabis business report)
The Legal Landscape Of CBD Hemp Flower In Europe

The Delta 8 Weekly Newsletter (All you need to know about Delta 8 thc)Regulators Go After Smokable Hemp Flower – What Does The Future Hold?
Investing in Delta 8 THC Flowers – Is It The Right Move For Your Business? (All you need to know about the latest hot trend: Delta-8 THC)

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Friday, October 9, 2020 Headlines | Marijuana Today Daily News

Marijuana Today Daily Headlines
Friday, October 9, 2020 | Curated by host Shea Gunther

// Congresswoman Helps Constituents Learn How To Buy Legal Marijuana One Day Before Maine’s Sales Begin (Marijuana Moment)

// Retail marijuana sales begin in Maine (Leafly)

// Months After Coronavirus Shutdown, Mass. Pot Shops Say Business Is Steady (WBUR)


These headlines are brought to you by Atlantic Farms, a Maine-based multistate cannabis business with operations in Maine and Massachusetts. Atlantic Farms is looking for people to help it grow and evolve as investors. Open up TheAtlanticFarms.com for more on the company and email info@theatlanticfarms.com to learn about investment opportunities.


// Justices Look Again At High-Stakes Marijuana Case (WUFT NPR)

// Military Veterans Group Asks Federal Court To Hear Marijuana Case Challenging DEA Classification (Marijuana Moment)

// Former U.S. Senate Majority Leader Tom Daschle backs legal marijuana in South Dakota (Argus Leader)

// Top New Mexico Lawmaker Is Hopeful State Can Legalize Marijuana In 2021 Session (Marijuana Moment)

// Trevin Jones Stripped Of August UFC Win & Fined $1,945 For Positive Marijuana Test (Jiu-Jitsu Times)

// On-demand recreational marijuana delivery comes to metro Detroit (Detroit Free Press)

// Oregon 2020 Election: Vote Yes! on Measure 109 (Canna Law Blog)


Check out our other projects:Marijuana Today— Our flagship title, a weekly podcast examining the world of marijuana business and activism with some of the smartest people in the industry and movement. • Marijuana Media Connect— A service that connects industry insiders in the legal marijuana industry with journalists, bloggers, and writers in need of expert sources for their stories.

Love these headlines? Love our podcast? Support our work with a financial contribution and become a patron.

Photo: Maayan Windmuller/Flickr

Thursday, September 17, 2020 Headlines | Marijuana Today Daily News

Marijuana Today Daily Headlines
Thursday, September 17, 2020 | Curated by host Shea Gunther

// House Marijuana Vote In Question Following Leadership Remarks But ‘Schedule Hasn’t Changed’ (Marijuana Moment)

// Vermont Lawmakers Finally Reach Deal On Marijuana Sales Legalization Bill (Marijuana Moment)

// Illinois recreational marijuana sales hit nearly $64 million in August marking a new record (Chicago Tribue)


These headlines are brought to you by Curaleaf, one of the leading vertically-integrated cannabis operators in the U.S. With legal medical and adult use marijuana dispensaries, cultivation sites, and processing facilities all over the United States, Curaleaf has served more than 350,000 medical cannabis patients and looks forward to helping many more long into the future. Swing over to Curaleaf.com to learn more about this very cool company!


// Congressional Lawmakers Ask Supreme Court To Hear Marijuana Lawsuit Against DEA (Marijuana Moment)

// Is Arizona’s New Medical Marijuana Testing Program About to Cause Shortages? (Phoenix New Times)

// Canadian Retailer Fire & Flower Q2 Revenue Increases 24% Sequentially to $28.6 Million (New Cannabis Ventures)

// Trulieve Raises C$100.45 Million Selling Shares at C$24.50 (New Cannabis Ventures)

// Sheriff’s deputies are not serving warrants cutting down weed in wildfire evacuation zones (Growth Op)


Check out our other projects:Marijuana Today— Our flagship title, a weekly podcast examining the world of marijuana business and activism with some of the smartest people in the industry and movement. • Marijuana Media Connect— A service that connects industry insiders in the legal marijuana industry with journalists, bloggers, and writers in need of expert sources for their stories.

Love these headlines? Love our podcast? Support our work with a financial contribution and become a patron.

Photo: Phil Roeder/Flickr