Bundling Up Seven Leaves: How Sami Bundlez Turned a Normal Grow Into a Proprietary Powerhouse

Part of what makes competing in today’s legal landscape so difficult is that it takes far more than just a quality product to attract consumers. While back in the medical days, many cultivators weren’t even branding their stuff, let alone designing flashy packaging, today, it’s essential for any producer who wants to see their consumer again, let alone generate any consistency. 

With major grows driving down the price per pound lower with every harvest, cultivators’ only hope to compete against the money guys is to develop a brand that will generate name recognition. One that the consumers come in and ask for, not just buy because it’s available. While there are many brands that have figured out how to generate a cult following that builds demand for their products even in states still facing prohibition, few are as tapped in as Seven Leaves.

You might not guess it, since you can find knock-offs of their mylars in just about any head shop across the country, but Seven Leaves wasn’t always the visibly hyphy brand it is today. In fact, while they’ve been cultivating stand-out flower since 2008, it wasn’t until the end of 2017 that the brand got its modern facelift. This facelift, as well as the curation of many of the strains the market is currently fiending for, like Zruntz for example, is thanks in no small part to the efforts of Sami Bundlez.

Meet Sami

Originally from Yonkers, but having moved to Sacramento at a very young age, Sami’s been running the plant since he was just a boy. Having gotten caught with weed for the first time in 1995, the year before the medicinal legalization of the plant, Sami fondly remembers the experience.

“I got caught with weed at school—a shitload of it too—and it was crazy, bro, because the security guard there was like, ‘Don’t even worry about it. This shit is going legal next year; just don’t fuck around.’” Sami said. “And sure enough it actually went legal, and that’s when my parents stopped tripping off me and weed. But I was never really attached to it; weed just always played a part because I was always into music.”

It was the music that built his network. Between rapping with friends and going to shows with Bay Area-legend the Jacka, who was one of Sami’s best friends before his tragic death, Bundlez built a rapport with many key players across Northern California. He credits much of his network and understanding to Jacka, who even kicked him down some verses for his own projects back in the day.

“This weed shit, and this music shit, go hand in hand. It’s always something I’ve always wanted to do,” Sami told me. “[Jacka] fucked with us in the long way, bro, like where we got phone calls before going out to shows like, ‘Hey I’m performing here, I want y’all to come with me.’ That’s how we built the face.”

Courtesy of Seven Leaves

Bundling Up

“From there, I got into throwing concerts. We brought everybody out—from Future to Uzi, Post Malone, Belly—bringing everybody to Sacramento. I just kept working with the weed shit like I was building my brand—the Sami Bundlez brand. Every time somebody would come to Sac, they would say, ‘Call Bundlez.’

“I know I got some fire-ass weed, and me branding myself as, you know, that guy,” he added. “The name stands for itself. People would always hit me up, but we weren’t branding it, like, on T-shirts or on packaging—nothing like that yet; it was just all an idea. Fieldz from Zkittlez was actually like, ‘Bro, you should start your own shit—just do it!’ But it was funny because once he said it, so many other people came and was like, ‘Yo, you should do this.’”

Understanding that he now had the network and know-how to not only source the products the market wanted, but to get them into the right hands, Sami began plotting his legal play.

“My boy [Brian Khem] hits me up, and he’s like, ‘Yo Bundlez, you know, I work for a company that has a significant amount of lights. And I think that if you came here, it’d be something you know, that you could do here.”

Although the deal certainly didn’t happen overnight, that company was Seven Leaves, and Brian was onto something…

Seven Leaves
Courtesy of Seven Leaves

The Next Level: Seven Leaves

Seven Leaves was founded by Mike B, Tyler Kerns and Gary nearly a decade ago in Sacramento. With a cultivation facility already producing solid work by this point thanks to Brian’s know-how, Sami was able to see a blueprint from their first meeting. 

“I gave [Brian] a list of what genetics I needed. I gave him a list of who I wanted to work with and what I wanted to do, and we moved forward.” Sami recounted. “I brought [former NBA athlete] Matt Barnes on, and the first thing we ever did was the Matt Barnes prerolls. That started everything.”

More than just attention, Sami quickly realized Seven Leaves would need a real brand voice and some help on the genetics side, to transcend. His efforts can be directly felt through the brand’s aesthetic. From the colors to the names, Sami mapped out everything. At one point, there was even a discussion about totally rebranding and running with a new name.

“They said, ‘You know, we’re down to try something new.’ But just to show them what I had to bring to the table, and what I could do, I was like, ‘Nah, we’re going to run with this’—and we RAN with it. I created the menu there that everybody knows. Blue Slush, Bon Bons, VoVo, Brainfood. 

“I brought on guys that I’ve been rubbing shoulders with my whole life, like Zkittlez, from Humboldt and Mendocino County.” He remembered fondly. “When me and Matt came on board, you know, we built Seven Leaves out to be a lifestyle brand—our lifestyle. We brought our lifestyle to this brand, and then we marketed it that way.”

Courtesy of Seven Leaves

Living the Lifestyle

For Sami, ‘lifestyle brand’ isn’t just a fun marketing term. Sami really lives it. In his own words, here’s the daily routine:

“First thing I do in the morning is roll me up a Lemon Slush and make some coffee. After that, I’ll go with the Blue Slush, boom. After my workouts, you know, later on in the day, I’ll smoke the Brain Food. Then, you know, I might roll up some Vovo. And then, absolutely not before 9 p.m., because it’ll ruin my day for real, I’m gonna smoke the Bon Bons because that shit right there is the insomnia killer. That shit will knock you out cold.”

“I followed the Jacka blueprint, the Berner blueprint.” Sami explained. “I followed the guys that came before me that really did this shit. I tip my hat to these guys. We tried to veer off as much as we can so we’re not mimicking nobody, but those are the people that gave me the inspiration to do everything that I wanted to do.”

Although it’s clear Sami’s happy to take the credit for ramping the brand up, he’s quick to admit he didn’t walk into a broken vessel.

“My boy Brian’s the man that made it all happen, like the head grower at Seven Leaves,” he explained. “I tip my hat to Mike and Tyler and Gary and everybody else who had a hand in Seven Leaves. My boy Hansel. And Brian—this dude is like a green thumb’s green thumb, bro. His shit is literally why everybody is talking about Seven Leaves right now. You know what I’m saying? Like, I just came in and put the shit on loudspeaker!”

Courtesy of Seven Leaves

A Rising Tide

With more attention and more consumers coming in by the day, the hype the brand has built, as well as the network Bundlez has amassed over his career, has afforded the brand more opportunities to collaborate and carve out its space within the industry. Through an expanded partnership with the Terp Hogz/Zkittlez team, Seven Leaves has now co-branded a few proprietary strains Sami considers to be among the greatest to ever grow. 

“I think the Zkittlez phenos and flavors, you know, that they’ve been working on for the past five to 10 years are going to be the next thing that’s going to be talked about for the next fucking 10 to 15 years,” Sami said. “Everything else has had its run, bro.”

But the collaborations don’t stop there. The first of many co-brands with musicians to come, Seven Leaves released Wowzers, Belly’s hand-selected personal strain, earlier this year. Bundlez was also able to mention that they’re currently working on something with Cozmo.

“It’s like Coca-Cola, bro! We’re by no means trying to compete, or compare with anybody. We’re just here to let everyone know what we’re doing. Show them what we have and let them experience what we got coming up on the market.”

Fan Leaves

With new flavors and partnerships in development, Sami has now set his sights onto expansion. Having started a skate team during COVID, and a street team on the East Coast, Bundlez has always prided himself on delivering the unexpected.

“I feel like we just got to touch on different shit; I don’t think we should just be staying in that box of you know, this is weed.” He tells me, “We’re working on doing more merchandise. Different designs—not always just the logo, or trying to make a quick buck. We’re doing skateboards. Everything that we do, we want it to be educational—lifestyle educational. You’re going to get something from this other than just high.”

It’s clear from talking to him how excited he is about what he’s doing. He gets just as excited as I do when I open each of the different bags to take a whiff. For someone who’s got the visibility across the industry that he does, despite the frustrations of the legal market, Bundlez remains grateful. In maybe the best example of this, before I leave, he asks me to include:

“I want to shout out the guys who helped me put all this shit together, for real. And, you know, our street teams everywhere. And everybody who fucks with us. Everybody who smoked Seven Leaves and posted it. Anybody who’s ever really took their time, and money, to buy and try seven leaves out, I want to thank those people. Other than that, like you know, shout out to Jay Bape and Jigs and… shit, that’s pretty much it.”

The post Bundling Up Seven Leaves: How Sami Bundlez Turned a Normal Grow Into a Proprietary Powerhouse appeared first on High Times.

A Q&A with Matt Barnes: Former NBA Player Turned Cannabis Advocate

After 14 seasons and nine different teams, professional basketball player Matt Barnes won his first-ever championship with the 2017 Golden State Warriors. Months later, he announced his retirement. The following 4/20, a Washington Post article with the headline “‘All my best games I was medicated’: Matt Barnes on his game-day use of marijuana” is published. In it, Barnes speaks candidly about his cannabis use while in the NBA – one of the first instances of him openly sharing his story with the goal of normalizing cannabis in professional sports.

Barnes has since become one of the leading voices of professional athletes calling for the end of penalties for cannabis use while being an active player. Over the past few years, he’s planted roots in the cannabis industry by investing in his hometown of Sacramento through a dispensary called Seven Leaves. He also serves as a senior advisor to Eaze’s minority-focused cannabis business incubator, Momentum.

As we closed in on 2020, Matt joined us from his home in Los Angeles for a Zoom call where he shared his journey as a professional athlete and cannabis advocate, along with his hope for reform under new government leadership.

Cannabis Now: How have you and your family been holding up during the pandemic?

Matt Barnes: Since I was 18, this is the first time I’ve gotten to sit down. I went to UCLA in 1998, and ever since, I’ve been traveling the world to play basketball. Fortunately, I was able to play 15 years, but then I retired and went right into media. I’m working for ESPN and Showtime, traveling all around the country. Though it’s unfortunate circumstances, the pandemic has allowed me to finally sit my ass home. I do my podcast from home, I do ESPN from home, and I get to spend more time with my kids. I’m a single father of three; my twins just turned twelve, my youngest guy [turned] two on December 7. I’m getting to stay home and do the day-to-day things that I retired to do, that I hadn’t been able to do before. We’ve been blessed.

CN: You have an incredible podcast, All the Smoke, where you and fellow retired NBA player Stephen Jackson interview professional athletes and coaches. Given the name of the podcast, how often would you say cannabis comes up? Are there any memorable guests who stand out when it comes to their cannabis use?

We’ve interviewed guys who are still playing that were a little hesitant talking about it, but you know, we do stuff off the camera. One person who comes to mind is The Godfather for my generation: Snoop. It’s been great to talk to him about the plant and seeing his evolution. He came in as someone that was focusing on just getting high, and I’ve been talking to him more about explaining to the world why [he] uses [cannabis]. That’s been my goal when I talk to my colleagues or former athletes about cannabis – I always encourage people to tell their stories.

Just like the next person, I enjoy getting high, but there’s a lot of benefits from it, and I think that’s important when pushing forward a message of nationwide legalization – to erase the old stigmas of the high component and explain the beneficial uses of cannabis. It’s been a fun journey post-career, kind of being a shield for the guys in the league. I’m one of a handful of people that current [NBA] players look to for questions when it comes to using cannabis or not.

CN: What was your path to becoming this cannabis guru for professional athletes?

I was a product of the ’80s. My parents were functioning drug addicts. I saw a lot of different stuff when I was younger, and I remember one of the things I enjoyed smelling at a young age was cannabis. My parents also smoked cigarettes, and I used to hate the smell of those, but there was a different smell when my dad would light that weed up at the end of the day.

At the age of 14, I tried it. My first experience was terrible; I got a headache and passed out. But I wasn’t a quitter – I jumped right back on the horse and have been using it religiously for the past 26 years. Through high school, UCLA, my entire professional career, it’s been there for me…It’s always mellowed me out, made me more levelheaded, helped with sleep, stress, and the anti-inflammatory components help a lot as well. I played 15 years, I won a championship, and I think my story will help erase that stigma of people thinking it’s a gateway drug.  

CN: Can you talk a little bit about the drug testing in the NBA and what that was like for you when you were in the league?

In the NBA, they give you three strikes for drugs in general. I don’t think cannabis should be called a drug anymore, but it’s still called a drug in the NBA. I had 2.75 strikes in about 15 years. I got caught twice. If you think you’re going to fail, you are allowed to call the drug program and admit yourself willingly. I did that twice even though they are supposed to allow it once. The third strike is suspension for five days, which is a lot of money missed, and it becomes public record. Luckily, I avoided that in my career.

Something interesting in going through the drug program a few times was talking to the guys who run it about how many players were in for cannabis alone. There are over 400 players in the NBA, and at the time I was in [the program], there were over 200 players in just for weed. It’s ridiculous ‘cause the league says they want what’s best for the players, but they’re pumping us full of opioids that are gonna mask one problem and cause another. Then they want to suspend us, fine us and maybe cost us our jobs over consuming cannabis. That’s why myself, Al Harrington and some other athletes are pushing the needle on the NBA. We understand how beneficial this plant is.

If [the league] would do their research, which they are doing now, they’ll find they can use [cannabis] to prolong athlete’s careers. Normally the NBA is at the forefront of all issues, but we’re actually last right now when it comes to the use of cannabis or CBD. Hockey, major league baseball and even the NFL are kind of rewriting their policies when it comes to this, but I think we’ll be catching up shortly.

CN: You have said that you used cannabis while playing in the NBA. Did you use it for stress relief, for physical ailments or both?

At the beginning, it was psychological. I started [using cannabis] at 14 or 15 years old, and I had a really tough childhood – a lot of violence, drugs and abuse. Cannabis allowed me to escape, to focus, to sleep at night peacefully. So, in the beginning, it was more psychological. As I got older, my body was getting beat up with playing in the NBA, so I needed the relief component as well.

I risked a lot smoking it throughout my career, but there was no other outlet for me. People often don’t understand how mental this game is. If you’re fortunate enough to make it in the NBA, you’re a one percenter. Then the mental approach of the game kicks in – it’s really a mental space and a mental game. Cannabis always helped me control the mental side, and this is why I’m a huge advocate.

CN: Kind of like your NBA career, it’s hard to keep track of all the things you’ve accomplished while working in the cannabis industry – there have been so many! Can you give us a run-down of some favorite projects/ventures?

MB: My first thing is advocacy. The second I retired, I started speaking [about cannabis]. I was able to executive produce a piece for Bleacher Report called B/R x 4/20, and it was the first time you ever saw retired NBA and NFL players smoking cannabis on television, telling the world why [they] used it. I was kind of worried about how the world was gonna take to professional athletes on TV smoking weed, but it was nothing but positivity. That paved the way for me to freely speak for it.

I teamed up with UCLA for a little bit to work on their cannabis research program. I’m a part owner of Seven Leaves, which is a cannabis company in my hometown of Sacramento. We’re growing under 3,000 lights right now and really making a splash in the space. I teamed up with Eaze and have an advisory role on their Momentum Program, helping get into the social equity space and allowing people of color to have an equal opportunity. If you look at the numbers, there are only about 3 percent people of color in the cannabis space, which is terrible in my opinion. I’m proud to say I’m really helping push this movement forward.

The NBA vet talks cannabis use in the league, pushing Biden on the ’94 crime bill, and being a cannabis advocate and father.
CN: How do you feel about the equity programs that are in place now. Do you think that they’re effective at all, or do they still have a long way to go?

MB: It’s a lot to handle. Starting them was the right thing to do, but starting and actually finishing are two different things. I think there’s plenty that needs to be learned in the process. You are giving people who have never run or owned a business the opportunity to compete in a very competitive market. That’s why I think a lot of the minority [business owners] don’t last – because our people don’t have expertise in running businesses overall. I think there should be programs that allow [people of color] to be part of [the industry] but also educate them, which I think is a huge part of anyone’s success. The Momentum Program through Eaze is educating [people], and there’s a handful of other programs out there that are teaching people the ropes, so when they get in a position to secure licensing and try to go vertical in their business, they’re fully equipped.

CN: If you could pick one thing to change about the cannabis industry right now, what would it be?

MB: Just equal footing for minorities. That’s it. Like I’ve said, I think we were affected most by [the War on Drugs] but are still last in line. We missed prohibition, we missed the Gold Rush, and we can’t miss this Green Rush. That is my goal coming into this space – to continue to educate people, create opportunities and jobs and situations for people of color to excel in. We’ve been directly affected by this the most – losing our dads, our brothers, our sisters, our aunts, uncles, grandparents either to death or jail because of this plant. We need our reparations for this.

CN: This past year, with the Black Lives Matter movement breaking through to the mainstream, we saw many companies worldwide making statements in support of Black lives like never before. Were you observing the cannabis industry’s response, and do you think they handled it well compared to other industries?

MB: I think it’s important for all industries to do something. Now we’ve pulled back the blanket of how nasty this country has been at times and still can be. I think businesses want to align themselves with our people and in our communities, but I think what is important – and a lot of businesses miss the boat with this – is they’re trying to fix stuff in our communities with nobody from our communities guiding them. That’s why I think it’s important for myself to be a part of this movement.

For example, if you have no idea what my community is like, or what Compton is like, or the Chicago ghettos, how can you effectively help? Sometimes money is thrown at the biggest name or the biggest corporation, and they may not actually be doing the best work for those communities. It takes a little bit of due diligence; these companies need to be doing their homework.

CN: We saw a video of you bringing that sentiment to the national stage when you were pushing Biden about the controversial 1994 crime bill*. What was that moment like, and how did you feel about his response?

MB: The moment was surreal. I wasn’t gung-ho about Biden and Harris because with both of their track records, they’ve done a lot of damage in our communities. But I got the opportunity to go out there and talk to him and meet him, speak for him at a rally and go to some voting polls. He wanted minorities to vote for him, and the first thing that people are going to bring up is the crime bill. Hearing him break down the crime bill, describing the parts that he was against while understanding that he couldn’t get everything that he wanted, he went with what was presented after there was pushback – because we needed something at that time. I’m not saying the crime bill was the answer, but we needed something. The government put guns and drugs in the hood in the early ‘80s. I was just excited at the opportunity to get to talk to [Biden], and I really felt like we helped him get in office. Now our job is to hold him and Kamala Harris accountable.

*The Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act, now known as the 1994 crime bill, gave billions in funding to state prisons and police while disenfranchising people of color.

CN: Do you think decriminalization and adult-legalization will continue to be led by the states, or will the Biden-Harris administration bring about federal cannabis laws?

MB: I’m hoping state-by-state [cannabis legislation] continues, but it would be great to get a federal overhaul and just legalize it. Once we figure out a sweet point for taxation, this is going to be a huge revenue maker for all these states. Cannabis is the one thing that brings everyone together. I feel like if everyone smoked weed, the world would be a better place overall, and that’s no bullsh*t. Hopefully this plant can not only bring financial stability to states across the country, but also bring people together.

CN: Since you are a father and family man, as well as a cannabis advocate, have you had any talks about the plant with your kids?

MB: You know, we had that conversation when [my twins] were…about nine maybe? I never smoke in front of my kids, but one night I put them to sleep and went out to smoke a joint by the pool. I guess one of the boys had looked through their window and saw me smoking because they came down the next morning and said, “Dad, if you smoke cigarettes, your lungs are gonna turn black!” So, I kept it real and said, “You know how Daddy plays basketball and his back, knees and ankles hurt? When they give me medicine [for the pain], it gives me an upset stomach. And when I smoke a joint, it makes all my pain go away and helps me sleep.” One of the twins was like, “Oh, okay. Well, Dad my ankle hurts. When can I smoke?” I was like, “Oh sh*t.” [Laughs]

CN: This is for the weed nerds out there. Can you tell us what strains you’ve been into lately?

MB: I’ve been really into our homegrown strains. We have a Blue Slush at Seven Leaves that I’m really enjoying. Vovo and Bon Bons [are strains] from our facility that I’m also really enjoying. If you are in California and get a chance, check those out. Hopefully with our expansion, we can start getting them all over the country.

I don’t smoke as much anymore because I’m really busy, and I’m a father of three, but I still do have my two or three joints a day. I wake and bake; I’ll get a mid-day joint; and I’ll have one to put me to sleep, so I’m across the board as far as hybrids, sativas and indicas. It’s just kind of a way of life. Smoking has always been there for me, and it’ll always be there for me. I will continue to advocate for it, and hopefully help change some regulations in professional sports and even some laws.

The NBA halted their cannabis testing program when the 2019-2020 season resumed in order to avoid unnecessary contact due to COVID-19 concerns. This policy has continued throughout the 2020-2021 season. The NBA has not made a formal statement or confirmed if they will discontinue testing or penalize players for cannabis use.

This interview has been edited for length and clarity.

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