The Best Delta 8 Independence Day Sales Happening Right Now

Independence Day is a good time to stop and ask yourself how much freedom do you really have in your life? Last year it was all about COVID and freedom was a non-existence. This year, while the pandemic is still here, the vaccines have brought us more freedom to live our lives the way we want them to be, and what we want are more Delta 8 deals…

Since it been first introduced last year, Delta 8 THC continues to take the world by storm and new Delta 8 products are available every week. This July 4th we have created a short list of the best Delta 8 independence day sales happening right now. Take advantage of this opportunity and stock-up on Delta 8 vapes, flowers, hash, gummies, chocolate, disposables, dabs and any other product you ever wished to have.

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Best Delta 8 Independence Day Sales:

UTOYA’S 30% Independence Day Sale

UTOYA'S 30% Independence Day Sale
UTOYA’S 30% Independence Day Sale

Celebrating Independence Day Utoya is offering a 30% site-wide discount, using the FREEDOM coupon code, allowing you to stock-up on their premium Delta 8 products.

Stocking-up opportunities:

The sale ends Monday, July 5th at 10am EST.

Don’t forget to use FREEDOM promo code to claim the 30% discount.

Click HERE to access the 30% site-wide sale

(With FREEDOM coupon code)

Want to sell Delta 8 products in your shop?
Click HERE to register a wholesale account

Industrial Hemp Farms 25% Site-Wide Sale

Industrial Hemp Farms 25% Site-Wide Sale
Industrial Hemp Farms 25% Site-Wide Sale

Take advantage of this 25% site-wide discount and stock-up on thier huge selection of both CBD, CBG and Delta 8 products (using the Independence25 coupon code).

Stocking-up opportunities:

  • Delta 8 softgels are a very practical product to carry with you. Take adavantage of this 25% sale and get yourself a box of 60 softgels for a price never seen before (less than 30 cents a softgels…)
  • With a huge selection of Delta 8 gummies, and an option to get them for such a low price, it is only natural gummies will be your next choice.
  • Delta 8 distillate is an essential product. Take advantage of this sale to get yourself some.
  • A bottle of Delta 8 THC tincture should always be with you, as there are so many usages for that product.
  • Delta 8 flowers & pre-rolls are among the most popular products, as everyone likes to smoke. Check what is available.

Don’t foeget to use Independence25 coupon code for the 25% discount.

Click HERE to save big on Delta 8 products

(With Independence25 coupon code)

Want to sell Delta 8 products in your shop?
Click HERE to register a wholesale account

Boston Hempire’s 30% Discount

With one of the largest selection of Delta 8, Delta 10, THCP, THCO and other rare cannabinoids Boston Hempire’s Independence Day sale offers us a great opportunity to stock-up on exotic product. Now, with a 30% discount, these products are a must-have.

Stocking-up opportunities:

Don’t forget ot use the FREEDOM  coupon code for the 30% discount.

Click HERE to stock-up on rare products

(With  FREEDOM coupon code)

Want to sell Delta 8 products in your shop?
Click HERE to register a wholesale account


PuroCannagars Delta 8 Pre-Rolls – Only $3.5/Joint

Delta 8 Pre-Rolls – Only $3.5/Joint
Delta 8 Pre-Rolls – Only $3.5/Joint

Just in time for Independence Day, PuroCannagars is offering a 33% discount on their Joints Full Flight – 14 flavor profiles with 2 joints per pack. This is only $3.5/joint (using the FLIGHT coupon code), the lowest price we have seen for Delta 8 pre-rolls.

With close to 30% cannabinoids in each pre-roll (18.47% Delta 8 + 9.93% CBD) this is a great price for these high-potency joints.

The bundle includes the following flavors (2 joints per pack, all-together 28 pre-rolls): Blue Dream, Pineapple Express, Green Crack, Lemon Cake, Mimosa, Ghost Train Haze, Gelato, Strawberry Cough, Girl Scout Cookies, OG Kush, Hippie Crasher, GG4, Gelatti & San Fernando Valley OG.

TIP: Don’t forget to use FLIGHT coupon code for 33% discount, ending in only $100 for a full flight of 28 pre-rolls.

Click HERE to get Delta 8 pre-rolls for only $3.5/joint

(With FLIGHT coupon code)

Have You Tried The New Delta 8 Hash?

Best Delta 8 THC Hash
Best Delta 8 THC Hash
Want to sell Delta 8 products in your shop?
Click HERE to register a wholesale account

More Delta 8 Independence Day Sales:

25% Discount on THCV + Delta 8 Vape Cartridges

25% Discount on THCV + Delta 8 Vape Cartridges
25% Discount on THCV + Delta 8 Vape Cartridges

If you are looking for the perfect blend, try the new THCV + Delta 8 + CBD vape cartridges, currently on sale.

While Delta 8 THC gives a great body-buzz and relaxation, THCV is made to help give mental clarity, productivity and focus. Similar to a “super sativa”. In addition, THCV might be also responsible in balancing your appetite (so if you are get the munchies after using cannabis, THCV might be the one for you…)

Each cart use 20% THCV, 30% Delta 8 THC, 45% CBD/CBN/CBC, and 5% Terpenes.

Current deal: save big on the 6 pack bundle with our Delta25 discount code. Each 6 pack includes 2 Purple Haze (Sativa), 2 Sour Tangie (Sativa) & 2 Candyland (Sativa).

TIP: Choose the 6-pack bundle and don’t forget to use Delta25 coupon code for an additional 25% discount (only valid for the bundles).

Click HERE to get THCV + Delta 8 vape cartridges

(With ‘Delta25’ coupon code)

Want to sell Delta 8 products in your shop?
Click HERE to register a wholesale account

25% Discount on Delta-10 THC Tincture

Because you deserve a long-lasting euphoria…

NEW: Delta-10 THC Tincture
NEW: Delta-10 THC Tincture

Want to try something new? The Delta 10 VIBIN’ Tincture is everything you ever hoped for and even more!

With 300mg Delta 10 and 700mg Delta 8 in every bottle, this best-selling product will let you experience the unique benefits of Delta 10 THC, softly blended with Delta 8, which we all know to love. If you are looking for a ‘mental euphoria‘ and wish to feel ‘happy and motivated‘ this product might be the one for you!

Strength: 1000mg/Bottle: 700mg of Delta 8 THC + 300mg Delta 10 THC

Terpenes Used: Sour diesel, Blueberry OG

Current deal: Get it for as-low-as $25/bottle, when buying the 3-pack bundle and using the Delta25 coupon for an additional 25% discount.

Click HERE to buy Delta-10 THC Tinctures

(With DELTA25 coupon code)

Want to sell Delta 8 products in your shop?
Click HERE to register a wholesale account

Never miss a deal! Subscribe to the Delta 8 Weekly newsletter

Affiliate disclaimer: We work hard to find and verify the best products, so we may include affiliate links to support the maintenance and development of this site.


Best Hemp Flower Deals, Coupons and Discounts

The post The Best Delta 8 Independence Day Sales Happening Right Now appeared first on CBD Testers.

Tuesday, November 17, 2020 Headlines | Marijuana Today Daily News

Marijuana Today Daily Headlines
Tuesday, November 17, 2020 | Curated by host Shea Gunther

// New Jersey Senate Approves Marijuana Decriminalization Despite Contentious Psychedelics Provision (Marijuana Moment)

// Rescoring of retail marijuana licenses in Illinois allowed to proceed (Marijuana Business Daily)

// Mexico slowly advances adult-use cannabis law – setting up key vote next week (Marijuana Business Daily)


These headlines are brought to you by All Kind of Portland, Maine, purveyors of fine legal medical marijuana products (and soon adult use!).


// Virginia governor vows to press for adult-use marijuana program (Marijuana Business Daily)

// Rhode Island Will ‘Absolutely’ Consider Legalizing Marijuana In 2021 New House Speaker Says (Marijuana Moment)

// Columbia Care Increases Revenue by 145% Prepares for Strong 2021 (Green Market Report)

// Canadian cannabis firm Pure Sunfarms delivers another profitable quarter (Marijuana Business Daily)

// Vireo Health Raises $5 Million with Pennsylvania Dispensaries Sale (New Cannabis Ventures)

// Wholesale marijuana hemp oil prices fall nationwide amid growing supply of raw material (Marijuana Business Daily)

// America’s longest serving nonviolent cannabis prisoner to be released after 32-year sentence (Independent)


Check out our other projects:Marijuana Today— Our flagship title, a weekly podcast examining the world of marijuana business and activism with some of the smartest people in the industry and movement. • Marijuana Media Connect— A service that connects industry insiders in the legal marijuana industry with journalists, bloggers, and writers in need of expert sources for their stories.

Love these headlines? Love our podcast? Support our work with a financial contribution and become a patron.

Photo: dogulove/Flickr

Tuesday, November 19, 2019 Headlines | Marijuana Today Daily News

Marijuana Today Daily Headlines
Tuesday, November 19, 2019 | Curated by host Shea Gunther

// New Jersey Voters Will Decide On Marijuana Legalization Next Year, Senate Leaders Say (Marijuana Moment)

// Cannabis stocks are a sea of red as selloff stretches to sixth straight day (Market Watch)

// Sanders Pledges Legal Marijuana ‘In Every State’ As Biden Faces ‘Gateway Drug’ Backlash (Marijuana Moment)


These headlines are brought to you by Curaleaf, one of the leading vertically-integrated cannabis operators in the U.S. With legal medical marijuana dispensaries, cultivation sites, and processing facilities all over the United States, Curaleaf has served more than 165,000 medical cannabis patients and looks forward to helping many more long into the future. Swing over to Curaleaf.com to learn more about this very cool company!


// AOC Calls For Decriminalizing The Use Of All Drugs (Marijuana Moment)

// Potential $1.7 billion adult-use cannabis market in Michigan gears up for Dec. 1 launch (Marijuana Business Daily)

// ‘Big Marijuana’ enters South Jersey as politically connected Acreage buys nonprofit (Philadelphia Inquirer)

// Health Canada OK with Hexo’s proactive fix on unlicensed cannabis cultivation (Marijuana Business Daily)

// Boston eyes total revamp of pot licensing (Boston Herald)

// How Mass. Cannabis Inspectors Keep A Watchful Eye Over The Legal Pot Industry (WBUR 90.9)

// BC offers CA$676,000 to help cannabis entrepreneurs join legal market (Marijuana Business Daily)


Check out our other projects:
Marijuana Today— Our flagship title, a weekly podcast examining the world of marijuana business and activism with some of the smartest people in the industry and movement.
Marijuana Media Connect— A service that connects industry insiders in the legal marijuana industry with journalists, bloggers, and writers in need of expert sources for their stories.

Love these headlines? Love our podcast? Support our work with a financial contribution and become a patron.

Photo: liz west/Flickr

Heavy Regulations Allow Illegal Marijuana Sales to Persist, Study Argues

Excessive state regulations may be the reason illegal marijuana markets continue to exist after legalization, a new exploratory study found after looking at data from the first two U.S. states to end cannabis prohibition.

“The qualitative analysis of news reports reveals that regulation is one of the main reasons that people stay in the illicit market,” the paper stated. “The comparison of marijuana crime trends in Colorado and Washington shows mixed findings. While marijuana offense rates in Colorado largely remained steady over the years, those in Washington increased dramatically after the implementation of more intensive regulations.”


Regulation is one of the main reasons that people stay in the illicit market.
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Published in July 2019, the research is the master’s thesis of Sikang Song, a graduate student of the criminology and criminal justice department at Portland State University in Oregon.

Song wrote that he was interested in understanding why the unregulated marijuana market persists in states where cannabis is legal. Since growers, sellers and consumers have “legitimate channels” to produce, trade and obtain cannabis, these illegal avenues should presumably diminish.

Yet research shows they haven’t disappeared altogether: In 2018, one report found that 18% of cannabis consumers in California purchased marijuana products from an unlicensed seller.

For his analysis, Song investigated whether there’s an association between how intense state cannabis-related regulations are and the extent of the remaining illegal market. First, he reviewed news articles published between late 2013 to April 2019 featuring interviews with cultivators, sellers, and consumers who shared the various reasons why they remain in the unregulated market. He then looked into whether marijuana arrest rates changed in the first two legal states after new sets of regulations were installed.

In Washington, he used June 2016 as the intervention point, and in Colorado, he used November 2015 and January 2017 as intervention points. (In 2017, for example, Colorado lawmakers passed new rules regarding labeling and packaging of all containers holding marijuana flower and trim, as well as concentrates and other products.)


The reasons most people said they grew or sold marijuana illegally were ‘strict regulations and the high cost associated with the compliance.’
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According to the study, the reasons most people said they grew or sold marijuana illegally were “strict regulations and the high cost associated with the compliance.”

“Over two-thirds of recording units (68%) contain interviews and quotations from black-market participants stating this reason,” the paper states. “Terms such as ‘overregulation,’ ‘cost of compliance,’ ‘high taxes’ are frequently used in the headlines and texts to describe ‘barriers’ for ‘small producers’ to enter the legal market or ‘drive’ them to the black market.”

Other reasons for staying in the illegal marijuana market included high taxes, market fluctuations, and organized crime.

Using an interrupted-time series analysis, Song also found that Washington’s crime rate increased after the state introduced more regulations. “In 2014 and 2015, the marijuana crime rates per 100,000 residents were both at around 26,” he wrote. “This number was increased to more than 28 incidents per 100,000 residents in 2016. In 2017, a total of 2,628 marijuana crimes were reported by law enforcement agencies in Washington, making the annual crime rates 35.96 per capita.”

Colorado, on the other hand, did not see any significant short- or long-term changes to its cannabis-related crime rates after the state implemented new marijuana regulations.

“Although the findings are not conclusive, the results of Washington data show that regulation intensity may be one of the main factors that influences or explains the persistence of illegal cannabis transactions after the legalization,” the study states. “The fact that Washington’s marijuana black market kept growing after the implementation of more complex and sophisticated regulations at least indicates a correlation between regulation intensity and the increase of the black market in the case of Washington.”

The fact that similar findings were not reported in Colorado, the study continued, suggests “the magnitude of illicit marijuana activities may be affected by regulation intensity in some states.”

Ultimately, the author pointed out, these results raise questions about “the possible adverse effect of intensive regulations to researchers and policymakers.”

If one of the goals in marijuana legalization is to eliminate the unregulated market, Song wrote, then it’s important for lawmakers to consider the implications of unnecessarily strict state rules. Instead, they should focus on creating an “equitable and accessible market that allows the coexistence of both large and small businesses.”

“The cost of compliance to regulations should be reduced to remove the barriers of establishing a legal marijuana business,” Song concluded, adding that “future policies should also pay more attention to cracking down [on] persistent illegal growers and sellers and organized crime groups who are unwilling to participate the legal market.”


Feature image: States that overregulate legal marijuana sales tend to find their underground markets remain robust, a Portland State University graduate student concluded in his criminology and criminal justice master’s thesis. (Gina Coleman/Weedmaps News)

This article was republished from Marijuana Moment under a content syndication agreement. Read the original article here. 

The post Heavy Regulations Allow Illegal Marijuana Sales to Persist, Study Argues appeared first on Weedmaps News.

With Plummeting Cannabis Prices, Alaska’s Industry Calls for Tax Relief

Alaska marijuana grower Leif Abel considers his business successful but still feels like he’s living “paycheck to paycheck” much of the time.

A greenhouse expansion is behind schedule, and he said the company could have hired more crews to work on it if taxes and other expenses weren’t so high.

“We don’t have enough of a cushion where we could comfortably have a crop failure, and that’s not a very safe place for a cultivation company to be,” said Abel, an owner of Greatland Ganja in the Kenai Peninsula community of Kasilof.

Abel is among a number of Alaska cannabis growers who have struggled to pay the state’s $50-per-ounce cannabis tax as marijuana prices have tumbled. He said he’s paid his taxes on time, but it hasn’t always been easy.

Forty-five growers in the state are delinquent, compared with six in 2018, according to figures provided by Alaska’s Department of Revenue. For the June 2019 tax filing period, more than 160 growers had filed a tax return with the state.

The cannabis tax is imposed on cultivators when marijuana is sold or transferred from a grow facility to a retail shop or product manufacturer. There is a lesser tax rate for immature bud and trimmings.

Among states that have legalized recreational cannabis, Alaska is the only one whose tax structure is built solely on a fixed dollar amount paid by growers, according to information compiled by the Pew Charitable Trusts, a public policy organization. Alaska has no statewide sales tax, though some municipalities, such as Anchorage, levy their own sales tax on weed.

In comparison, California has a fixed dollar amount cultivators must pay and has a 15% tax on retail sales. Local governments in that state can add a levy on top of the state tax on retail sales. Nevada has a percentage-based tax that also applies to growers.

In Alaska, the total amount of late taxes due, with accruing penalties and interest, is about $1 million, according to the department.

“When you get into a hole, it’s really hard to get out when the holes keep getting deeper underneath you,” said Jana Weltzin, an attorney who represents Alaska cannabis interests.

When the industry first started, prices were around $4,000 a pound, or 0.45 kilograms, said Cary Carrigan, executive director of the Alaska Marijuana Industry Association, a trade group. They have settled around $2,300 a pound, he said.

While the price was expected to decline, “no one anticipated that the floor would drop that low, to the point where if you paid your taxes on time, you would not have enough money to pay your employees or your electric bill or something else would suffer,” he said. “That’s why there are so many delinquencies and people that are working on tax payment programs.”

The tax generated anticipated revenue of about $1.8 million for the state in June 2019. Three-quarters of state pot revenue is intended to be used for recidivism programs and a marijuana education and treatment fund.

Dane Wyrick shows the growing area of Danish Gardens, a marijuana cultivation site and retailer in Anchorage, Alaska’s largest city. Alaska charges a $50 per ounce, or 28.35 grams, tax on growers. The proportion of taxes has grown as the price of cannabis has fallen by nearly half from $4,000 a pound, or 0.45 kilograms, to nearly $2,300 a pound, according to the Alaska Marijuana Industry Association. (Mark Thiessen/The Associated Press)

Kelly Mazzei, excise tax manager with the Revenue Department, in a letter to marijuana regulators earlier in 2019 called the number of late accounts alarming. The tax debt doesn’t go away if a business goes under, she told The Associated Press.

Many in the industry blame the tax, though some also see an unlimited number of licensees as part of the problem. Oregon officials cited that state’s issue with unlimited licenses after a massive oversupply of marijuana led to a freefall in prices.

Weltzin said Alaska is not in that situation yet, but it’s a concern.

“Hopefully, we can get a system figured out where we have a more fair tax structure and a more stringent licensing process, so it will give value to our existing businesses but still encourage new business growth,” she said.

Alaska’s $50-an-ounce, or 28.35 grams, tax was set by Measure 2, the 2014 voter initiative that legalized recreational marijuana for adults 21 and older. While the initiative allowed the state to establish lower rates for certain parts of the plant, which officials have done, a rewrite of the tax is considered up to the Legislature.

Surveys are planned to gauge industry representatives’ thoughts, Carrigan said.

“We’re trying to figure out … where the sweet spot is with that,” he said, with fairness among growers, retailers and manufacturers a key consideration.

Dane Wyrick said the future of his Anchorage cultivation and retail business, Danish Gardens, is hazy after feeling squeezed by state taxes and other expenses. He said the tax, combined with production expenses and other factors, is too burdensome.

Some industry officials and advocates hope for a sympathetic ear in Republican Gov. Mike Dunleavy, who has adopted an open-for-business mantra.

Dunleavy frustrated the industry earlier in 2019 by appointing to a marijuana regulatory board a woman who was involved in a failed effort to ban cannabis operations in Fairbanks. After lawmakers rejected the appointment, Dunleavy picked a former board member who supported the legalization effort and who Carrigan considers a good choice.

Assistant Commerce Commissioner Amy Demboski has convened a workgroup with industry interests, regulators and the Revenue Department to discuss what they see as business impediments, with taxes among the issues raised, Glenn Hoskinson, a special assistant to Commerce Commissioner Julie Anderson, said by email.

“This process is still in its infancy, so it’s too early to know if there is going to be any proposal or anything of substance from this working group,” Hoskinson wrote.

Carrigan sees this as an effort to move forward with the administration: “When somebody holds out an olive branch and wants to move forward, you don’t slap their hand.”

— Becky Bohrer 


Featured Image: Dane Wyrick of the Danish Gardens marijuana cultivation and retail facility in Anchorage, Alaska, says he’s feeling the squeeze of high costs, low cannabis prices, and a fixed-dollar-amount tax that he must pay to the state. Alaska is unique among legalized states for the fixed-amount tax levied on growers. (Mark Thiessen/The Associated Press)

The post With Plummeting Cannabis Prices, Alaska’s Industry Calls for Tax Relief appeared first on Weedmaps News.

Colorado Marijuana Market Continues to Grow; Adult-Use Sales Race Ahead

The share of legal marijuana sales in Colorado that came from the recreational market in 2018 significantly outpaced those from the medical market, according to an annual government report released on Aug. 5, 2019.

In fact, there were about two times as many adult-use sales of flower compared with medical cannabis purchases — a new milestone for the state.

Colorado‘s Marijuana Enforcement Division (MED) said that 288,292 pounds, or 130,767 kilograms, of bud were sold in 2018 for recreational purposes; meanwhile, 147,863 pounds, or 67,069 kilograms, were sold to medical marijuana patients. For comparison, in 2017, recreational consumers purchased 238,149 pounds, or 108,022 kilograms; and 172,994 pounds, or 78,468 kilograms, were sold to patients.

That means the recreational-medical gap increased 73% in one year. 

Via Colorado Marijuana Enforcement Division.

Overall, 436,155 pounds of cannabis were sold in 2018, compared with 411,143 pounds in 2017.

In part, the trend can be attributed to the ongoing expansion of Colorado’s adult-use cannabis market since the state’s first recreational shops opened in 2014. Medical cannabis sales were notably higher than recreational sales in that first year of implementation, with just 38,660 pounds coming from the adult-use market and 109,578 pounds sold to medical patients.

Medical and adult-use sales were roughly even in 2016. But by 2017, recreational sales accounted for 58% of the market. And in 2018, they represented 66% of the market.

The MED also found that licenses for recreational marijuana facilities increased by 3% (47 licenses) while medical business licenses declined by 8% (77 licenses).

Via Colorado Marijuana Enforcement Division.

“Data collection continues to be a priority at the MED,” Jim Burack, director of the program, said in a press release. “This ongoing analysis and compilation of industry information help inform the public and contributes to our outreach efforts to stakeholders.”

The report also showed that the adult-use market is the primary destination for individuals purchasing edibles. Of all edible sales, 86% came from recreational consumers. And from July to December 2018, 75% of cannabis plants were cultivated for adult use.

The market shift isn’t unique to Colorado. An analysis by The Associated Press from June 2019 detailed how states across the U.S. that have established recreational marijuana programs are seeing the number of medical patients decline as more consumers transition to the adult-use market.

That may be partially explained by individuals who sought out medical cannabis recommendations choosing not to renew their registration after recreational marijuana shops became available. To that point, a recent study found that many customers at recreational dispensaries are consuming cannabis for the same reasons that registered patients do, such as to alleviate pain and sleep issues.

A recent study found that many customers at recreational dispensaries are consuming cannabis for the same reasons that registered patients do, such as to alleviate pain and sleep issues.

The concern for some advocates, however, is that adult-use legalization could drive up prices for patients, or leave them with fewer product options tailored to therapeutic use as demand for high-THC products increases.

“When states pass adult-use legalization we are seeing many patients leave the strict controls of the medical programs,” David Mangone, director of government affairs at Americans for Safe Access, told Marijuana Moment. “Patients must already pay out of pocket for cannabis, and any added cost like a registration fee for a medical card or renewal can make the process of obtaining medicine extremely burdensome and costly.

“States like Colorado must continue to provide adequate benefits to patients to ensure the medical program remains robust.” Mangone added that “as states pass adult-use programs it is important that they continue to understand and appreciate the needs of patients.”

“A common frustration for many is not what happens in terms of access to cannabis, but rather what happens in terms of access to specific products. Products and flower with a high-THC content have a wider market appeal, but may not necessarily benefit the existing medical market.”

That said, one interesting finding from this latest MED report is that medical and recreational consumers alike seem increasingly interested in concentrates, with the units of such products sold to both nearly doubling from 2017 to 2018. Concentrates are sold at a much higher rate in the adult-use market, but the potent products evidently have growing appeal across the board.

Democratic Gov. Jared Polis recently celebrated tax earnings from marijuana sales, touting the fact that the state has amassed more than $1 billion in cannabis revenue that has been allocated to various social programs.

And the marijuana market is continuing to evolve in the state. Polis signed legislation in May 2019 allowing for home deliveries of cannabis products as well as social consumption sites.

Polis said in July 2019 at a conference with governors from around the country that the new delivery law could help mitigate impaired driving.


Feature image: Sales of adult-use marijuana are surging ahead of the amounts for medical use, according to a report from the Colorado Marijuana Enforcement Division, which also found that the adult-use market is the primary destination for individuals purchasing edibles. (Gina Coleman/Weedmaps News)

This article has been republished under a content syndication agreement with Marijuana Moment. Read the original article here. 

The post Colorado Marijuana Market Continues to Grow; Adult-Use Sales Race Ahead appeared first on Weedmaps News.

Louisiana Medical Marijuana Sales are About to Begin

Medical marijuana is expected to start reaching select dispensaries in Louisiana on Aug. 6, 2019, after the state agriculture department completed final testing and cleared therapeutic cannabis for release to patients.

Agriculture Commissioner Mike Strain announced Aug. 1 that GB Sciences, one of two state-sanctioned growers, can begin shipping to Louisiana‘s registered dispensaries. Strain thanked “everyone who has worked tirelessly from inception through production and testing to make this a reality.”

John Davis, GB Sciences Louisiana president, told The Associated Press that the company is coordinating with the dispensaries to start delivering medical marijuana in the state on Aug. 6.

“I can’t tell you how excited we are for patients,” Davis said.

Patients in Louisiana have been waiting years for medical marijuana after lawmakers created the regulatory framework for dispensing therapeutic cannabis in 2015. Regulatory disagreements slowed getting the product to shelves. Only the Louisiana State University (LSU) and Southern University agricultural centers, both in Baton Rouge, the capital, are authorized to grow medicinal marijuana. GB Sciences is LSU’s grower.

Nine dispensing pharmacies across the state have been chosen by the pharmacy board and have readied their locations while awaiting the product. But it’s unclear how many of those dispensaries will immediately begin dispensing medical marijuana in early August 2019. Delivery from the Baton Rouge growing facility could take longer, for example, to reach distant Shreveport than the dispensary only a few miles away.

Separately, Southern’s grower, Ilera Holistic Healthcare, planted its first crop in late July 2019 and has estimated its first product could be available by the fall at the earliest.

Louisiana lawmakers first set up the framework for medical marijuana in 2015. Four years later, the first legal medical marijuana products are set to reach dispensaries Aug. 6, 2019. (Gina Coleman/Weedmaps News)

Under the 2015 law and additional changes passed since then, Louisiana is allowing medical marijuana to treat a long list of diseases and disorders, such as cancer, seizure disorders, epilepsy, glaucoma, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and Parkinson’s disease.

Marijuana can be available in medicinal oils, pills, liquids, topicals, and an inhaler, such as that used by asthma patients. GB Sciences’ first product to be released to pharmacies will be tinctures.

— Melinda Deslatte

Feature Image: Medical marijuana will be available in tinctures, topicals, capsules, and inhalers when the first shipments arrive in Louisiana dispensaries on Aug. 6, 2019. (Gina Coleman/Weedmaps News)

The post Louisiana Medical Marijuana Sales are About to Begin appeared first on Weedmaps News.

California Now has an Overnight Music Festival with Onsite Weed Sales

Camping, cannabis, and live performances finally come together legally at the Northern Nights Music Festival , the first overnight music festival to allow recreational cannabis sales and use onsite in the U.S. Straddling the Humboldt and Mendocino county lines, and showcasing the cannabis culture of Northern California’s famed Emerald Triangle region, the festival is a sign of things to come as California AB 2020 allows for the integration of cannabis into popular public events across the state.

“The passage of AB 2020 opens the door for cannabis events wherever a local jurisdiction will approve it,” Peter Huson, the co-founder of Northern Nights Music Festival, told Weedmaps News. “Whether it’s a major festival or a farmer’s market, cannabis consumers have more opportunities to engage with brands on a personal level rather than over the counter at a trade show.”

Northern Nights is set to take place at the Cook’s Valley Campground on the banks of the Eel River, about 200 miles (322 kilometers) northwest of San Francisco, in the heart of the Emerald Triangle, a region known for producing top-quality cannabis. It will have its own Tree Lounge, where cannabis consumption is allowed and more than 20 local cultivators and manufacturers who will sell their products directly to attendees who are 21 or over. The Tree Lounge also will sport a stage for live performances, dubbed the “Tree Stage”, and a space for cannabis-related wellness activities including CBD-infused yoga, medicinal plants workshops, body work and more.

The main stage at the Northern Nights Music Festival in Humboldt and Mendocino counties. The event is California’s first overnight festival to offer legal cannabis sales and onsite consumption to its attendees. (Photo by Kristina Baky)

Humboldt County, which recently rebranded itself as America’s Cannabis Heartland, permitted Northern Nights for public cannabis consumption soon after California lawmakers passed AB 2020 in September 2018. The bill allows for local jurisdictions to grant temporary event licenses for cannabis sale and consumption for festivals and other events as long as the vendors have a state license under the Adult Use of Marijuana Act of 2016 to engage in commercial adult-use activity.

“This is a concert that has already been happening for years now and so they just wanted to add this sort of concessions component to have cannabis,” said Steve Lazar, Senior Planner with Humboldt County, “and we were able to do that as a pretty easy insertion.”

Live music and DJs play from several stages at the festival, which in 2019 will be among the first to allow legal onsite consumption now that a new law allows cannabis sales and consumption at a wider array of events statewide. (Photo by Glen Matheny)

Humboldt had already passed a county resolution in 2017 allowing cannabis consumption at private events. As a result,  the passage of AB 2020 at the state level gave them a “position that no one in the state was in, to be the first place in the country to allow this kind of event,” Lazar explained.

Northern Night’s Tree Lounge will be located on the Humboldt County side of the festival, while over on the Mendocino County side, a separate alcohol-consumption area means that attendees can enjoy the best of both worlds, but will have to cross county lines to consume either substance. Huson said the geographic separation was essentially a strategy to monitor compliance. 

“Safety and regulatory bodies want everyone to be safe and no one has seen a licensed cannabis sales and consumption area at a music festival before, especially one where there is also alcohol sales,” he said.

“The goal is to demonstrate our ability to produce a safe and responsible event with cannabis and alcohol sales happening at very large distances away from each other to start — separate counties in this case.  So if or when we propose to bring them closer together, we have a solid and compliant track record,” he said.

Before AB 2020, Proposition 64 limited legal recreational cannabis consumption to designated county fairgrounds and expositions. San Francisco was the first local jurisdiction to implement the bill, legalizing public consumption at a handful of festivals and events in public spaces that have histories of cannabis use even under prohibition. The city’s Outside Lands Festival, which takes place in Golden Gate Park, had a Grass Lands area in 2018, where cannabis education took place but sales or consumption weren’t yet permitted. The festival in 2019 could be the first in the city to fully adopt AB 2020 and have an onsite cannabis sales and consumption feature for attendees.

Huson said that it is thanks to the work of Salwa Ibrahim at Highland Events, who helped craft the AB 2020 legislation, lobby for its passage, and organize the Grass Lands area at the Outside Lands Festival, that Northern Nights can now be the first overnight festival to offer cannabis sales and consumption to its attendees. In its seventh year, Northern Nights was co-founded by three event production companies in Northern California, including Humboldt County’s World Famous Productions, and has been supported by local Emerald Triangle cannabis cultivators from the beginning.

One of six stages at the Northern Nights Music Festival in Humboldt and Mendocino counties will overlook the Eel River and beaches. (Photo by Kristina Baky)

The Tree Stage in the Tree Lounge is one of six stages at Northern Nights Music Festival. The main stage hosts headliners such as Big Wild, while smaller venues, including a River Stage that overlooks the beaches and green-glass water of the Eel River, showcase local and international talent. Adding legal cannabis consumption to attractions such as camping under the ancient redwoods and live performers and DJs aims to make the festival a pioneer in the global marijuana movement and a highlight of the Emerald Triangle’s emergence into the mainstream.


Feature image: Redwood trees and the campers beneath them take on a festive hue at the Northern Nights Music Festival. (Photo by Kristina Baky)

The post California Now has an Overnight Music Festival with Onsite Weed Sales appeared first on Weedmaps News.

California Now has an Overnight Music Festival with Onsite Weed Sales

Camping, cannabis, and live performances finally come together legally at the Northern Nights Music Festival , the first overnight music festival to allow recreational cannabis sales and use onsite in the U.S. Straddling the Humboldt and Mendocino county lines, and showcasing the cannabis culture of Northern California’s famed Emerald Triangle region, the festival is a sign of things to come as California AB 2020 allows for the integration of cannabis into popular public events across the state.

“The passage of AB 2020 opens the door for cannabis events wherever a local jurisdiction will approve it,” Peter Huson, the co-founder of Northern Nights Music Festival, told Weedmaps News. “Whether it’s a major festival or a farmer’s market, cannabis consumers have more opportunities to engage with brands on a personal level rather than over the counter at a trade show.”

Northern Nights is set to take place at the Cook’s Valley Campground on the banks of the Eel River, about 200 miles (322 kilometers) northwest of San Francisco, in the heart of the Emerald Triangle, a region known for producing top-quality cannabis. It will have its own Tree Lounge, where cannabis consumption is allowed and more than 20 local cultivators and manufacturers who will sell their products directly to attendees who are 21 or over. The Tree Lounge also will sport a stage for live performances, dubbed the “Tree Stage”, and a space for cannabis-related wellness activities including CBD-infused yoga, medicinal plants workshops, body work and more.

The main stage at the Northern Nights Music Festival in Humboldt and Mendocino counties. The event is California’s first overnight festival to offer legal cannabis sales and onsite consumption to its attendees. (Photo by Kristina Baky)

Humboldt County, which recently rebranded itself as America’s Cannabis Heartland, permitted Northern Nights for public cannabis consumption soon after California lawmakers passed AB 2020 in September 2018. The bill allows for local jurisdictions to grant temporary event licenses for cannabis sale and consumption for festivals and other events as long as the vendors have a state license under the Adult Use of Marijuana Act of 2016 to engage in commercial adult-use activity.

“This is a concert that has already been happening for years now and so they just wanted to add this sort of concessions component to have cannabis,” said Steve Lazar, Senior Planner with Humboldt County, “and we were able to do that as a pretty easy insertion.”

Live music and DJs play from several stages at the festival, which in 2019 will be among the first to allow legal onsite consumption now that a new law allows cannabis sales and consumption at a wider array of events statewide. (Photo by Glen Matheny)

Humboldt had already passed a county resolution in 2017 allowing cannabis consumption at private events. As a result,  the passage of AB 2020 at the state level gave them a “position that no one in the state was in, to be the first place in the country to allow this kind of event,” Lazar explained.

Northern Night’s Tree Lounge will be located on the Humboldt County side of the festival, while over on the Mendocino County side, a separate alcohol-consumption area means that attendees can enjoy the best of both worlds, but will have to cross county lines to consume either substance. Huson said the geographic separation was essentially a strategy to monitor compliance. 

“Safety and regulatory bodies want everyone to be safe and no one has seen a licensed cannabis sales and consumption area at a music festival before, especially one where there is also alcohol sales,” he said.

“The goal is to demonstrate our ability to produce a safe and responsible event with cannabis and alcohol sales happening at very large distances away from each other to start — separate counties in this case.  So if or when we propose to bring them closer together, we have a solid and compliant track record,” he said.

Before AB 2020, Proposition 64 limited legal recreational cannabis consumption to designated county fairgrounds and expositions. San Francisco was the first local jurisdiction to implement the bill, legalizing public consumption at a handful of festivals and events in public spaces that have histories of cannabis use even under prohibition. The city’s Outside Lands Festival, which takes place in Golden Gate Park, had a Grass Lands area in 2018, where cannabis education took place but sales or consumption weren’t yet permitted. The festival in 2019 could be the first in the city to fully adopt AB 2020 and have an onsite cannabis sales and consumption feature for attendees.

Huson said that it is thanks to the work of Salwa Ibrahim at Highland Events, who helped craft the AB 2020 legislation, lobby for its passage, and organize the Grass Lands area at the Outside Lands Festival, that Northern Nights can now be the first overnight festival to offer cannabis sales and consumption to its attendees. In its seventh year, Northern Nights was co-founded by three event production companies in Northern California, including Humboldt County’s World Famous Productions, and has been supported by local Emerald Triangle cannabis cultivators from the beginning.

One of six stages at the Northern Nights Music Festival in Humboldt and Mendocino counties will overlook the Eel River and beaches. (Photo by Kristina Baky)

The Tree Stage in the Tree Lounge is one of six stages at Northern Nights Music Festival. The main stage hosts headliners such as Big Wild, while smaller venues, including a River Stage that overlooks the beaches and green-glass water of the Eel River, showcase local and international talent. Adding legal cannabis consumption to attractions such as camping under the ancient redwoods and live performers and DJs aims to make the festival a pioneer in the global marijuana movement and a highlight of the Emerald Triangle’s emergence into the mainstream.


Feature image: Redwood trees and the campers beneath them take on a festive hue at the Northern Nights Music Festival. (Photo by Kristina Baky)

The post California Now has an Overnight Music Festival with Onsite Weed Sales appeared first on Weedmaps News.

New Law Preps Oregon to Cut Oversupply by Selling Interstate — Someday

If federal marijuana laws change, Oregon would be positioned to export and import cannabis to and from other states under a bill signed by Democratic Gov. Kate Brown in late June 2019. It was one of three pieces of marijuana legislation she approved in the span of a few days.

The export and import bill grants the governor authority to make agreements with neighboring states where marijuana is legal to provide for lawful interstate commerce of cannabis products. But the governor can exercise that authority only if the federal government makes it legal or if the Justice Department implements an administrative policy allowing for such commerce.

As it stands, no such federal policy exists.

Should that change, however, the law is expected to offset one of the biggest problems in Oregon‘s legal market: oversupply. The policy would give the state’s marijuana businesses the ability to export some of that excess marijuana that’s driven down prices and redirect it to underserved markets in surrounding states.

The bill was approved in the House in June 2019 after being previously passed by the Senate. Brown signed it without fanfare, as part of a group of legislation she approved the same day that also included a low-level cannabis conviction expungement bill.

The governor could enter into agreements only with states that have existing legal cannabis markets, and those states must be accessible via roadways. The bill stipulates that marijuana couldn’t be imported or exported via air or sea. For now, that means the state would be limited to interstate commerce with California, Nevada, and Washington.

There are additional requirements that any export or import deal would have to involve, including that cannabis products must be tracked and also meet Oregon’s packaging and labeling standards.

Lawmakers who supported the bill argued that it would not only provide relief for Oregon’s oversaturated cannabis market but also give the state a competitive advantage upon changes to federal law — something Brown said is a matter of “when” and not “if.”

The governor also signed in late June 2019 legislation  that would give the Oregon Liquor Control Commission the authority to deny cannabis license applications “based on the supply of and demand for marijuana” in the state — another attempt to mitigate the

Feature image: With a new law on the books, Oregon is now prepared to reduce its oversupply problem by allowing interstate sales, but only if federal marijuana laws change first.  Photo by Get Budding on Unsplash


This article was republished from Marijuana Moment under a content syndication agreement. Read the original article here. 

The post New Law Preps Oregon to Cut Oversupply by Selling Interstate — Someday appeared first on Weedmaps News.