Activists Accuse North Dakota of Misleading Voters About Cannabis Legalization Initiative

Activists supporting a North Dakota voter initiative to legalize marijuana are crying foul about a fiscal summary that will be included with the ballot measure, saying that is “incomplete” and “misleading” for voters. Voters will decide on the initiative from New Approach North Dakota, which would legalize pot for adults, in this November’s general election following an announcement last month from state officials that the measure had qualified for the ballot.

When voters get their ballots this fall, they will see a one-sentence fiscal summary that estimates the costs of implementing the initiative and revenue generated by the measure, should it be approved. Over the next five years, the summary estimates that costs will exceed revenue by more than $1.8 million.

“The estimated fiscal impact of this measure beginning in 2023 through the 2025-2027 Biennium is Revenue of $3,145,000 and Expenses of $4,985,000,” reads the fiscal summary.

But the estimate fails to include any revenue from taxes on cannabis sales, despite the taxes that would be generated by the proposal. If the ballot measure succeeds, cannabis sales would be taxed at the state sales tax rate of 5%, and local taxes of up to 3% could also be added. Lawmakers would also likely add an excise tax on cannabis that could be much higher.

Dave Owen, the chairman of New Approach North Dakota, said the fiscal note written for the ballot is “obviously incomplete” and “intentionally misleading” for voters, according to a report from the news website Inforum.

Tax Commissioner Brian Kroshus said unknown variables including the cost of cannabis products and the eventual volume of sales at cannabis retailers prevented his office from estimating how much tax revenue would be generated if the ballot measure succeeds and marijuana is legalized, according to media reports.

Other Estimates Project Up to $10 Million in Annual Weed Taxes

But others have already made estimates of the amount of tax revenue that would be generated by legal weed. Raymond March, an economics professor at North Dakota State University, projects that the state would receive about $6 million in tax revenue each year.

Dustin Gawrylow, a self-described fiscally conservative government watchdog and a member of the marijuana legalization measure’s sponsoring committee, said that revenue from legalization would far exceed the costs of implementing legal marijuana and failing to include estimated tax revenue in the fiscal summary is “not logical.” He estimates that state coffers would receive $8 million to $10 million each year if the ballot measure succeeds in November, based on legal marijuana sales in Montana this year, adjusted for the lower population in North Dakota.

When asked why the tax commissioner’s office could not develop an estimate of state revenue based on data from other states, Kroshus said that “Each (state) has their own unique tax and regulatory structure specific to them.”

The fiscal summary to be placed at the bottom of ballots is a condensed version of a three-page estimate developed with input from several state agencies. Jason Wahl, the director of the North Dakota Division of Medical Marijuana, presented the complete estimate to a panel of legislative leaders on Monday. Wahl said that the majority of the $3.1 million in projected state income would come from application and licensing fees levied on cannabis producers and retailers.

The complete summary also notes that “additional revenue is anticipated to be collected on the sale of cannabis products,” but the tax commissioner’s office said it was unable to estimate the amount of taxes that would be collected.

The Department of Transportation estimates it would incur much of the nearly $5 million dollars in estimated costs to hire an additional full-time employee, fund training, purchase drug screening devices and launch an anti-impaired driving campaign.

The medical marijuana division would also see expenditures to hire four additional employees and govern the recreational marijuana program. Wahl estimated that licensing and application fees would cover the costs incurred by his agency. The complete fiscal note adds that the Highway Patrol, the attorney general’s office and the state’s 53 counties could also face additional unknown costs.

The fiscal note is added to ballot measures to give voters an estimate of the costs and revenue the state would face if an initiative is approved. But critics including Owen, a political consultant, say the estimates are written by state agencies to influence the election.

“It is a well-known fact that when certain agencies don’t want something (to pass), they put an absurd fiscal note on it to try to kill it,” Owen said.

Ballot Measure Legalizes Cannabis for Adults

If passed by voters in the November general election, the ballot measure would legalize possession of up to one ounce of cannabis and small amounts of marijuana concentrates by adults 21 and older. The initiative also establishes a framework to regulate commercial cannabis production and sales, which would be administered by the state’s Department of Health and Human Services or another agency designated by lawmakers.

Regulators would be given until October 1, 2023 to draft regulations governing security for marijuana facilities, advertising and labeling, packaging and testing standards for cannabis products. The initiative caps the industry to seven production facilities and 18 cannabis retailers, with limits on the number of licenses held by any one entity.

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BDSA Report Projects $57 Billion in Global Cannabis Sales by 2026

A report published by the cannabis data company BDSA projects that by 2026, global cannabis sales will rise to $57 billion—an increase from the $30 billion of global cannabis sales collected in 2021. The “Global Market Forecast” was published on Sept. 13, and reviews expected milestones for the cannabis industry to hit within the next five years.

“The ‘hockey stick’ trend of sales growth seen in the early years of legal cannabis has passed, and economic and regulatory headwinds are exerting pressure on legal cannabis markets,” said BDSA CEO Roy Bingham in a press release. “Still, our updated forecast predicts that steady gains in developing U.S. markets will continue to drive single-digit annual growth in total U.S. legal sales in 2022, with continued growth prospects out to 2026.”

The report also projects that in the U.S., sales will rise from $25 billion in 2021 to $42 billion in 2026, making up about 75% of total global cannabis sales.

BDSA addresses how mature cannabis market prices are experiencing historically low prices. According to the Colorado Department of Revenue, adult-use sales continue to drop. Recreational sales in June 2022 reached $127,157,358, compared to June 2021 which reached $152,719,813. Medical cannabis sales in Colorado also follow a similar dip compared to last year’s sales data.

However, BDSA adds that states such as Oregon and Washington have implemented moratoriums to prevent over supply. Newer markets such as Illinois are continuing to do well though, having collected $2 billion in total sales in 2022 so far (14% more than sales collected in 2021). The report notes that markets like New Jersey, which recently launched its adult-use program, and New York, which is preparing for recreational cannabis sales very soon, will be high contributors to sales in the U.S. by 2026.

Between New Jersey and New York, there are 22 million adults who are expected to contribute $5 billion to the total $42 billion expected to be collected in 2026. “Though mature legal cannabis markets in the U.S. saw sales soften in 2022, the cannabis market is still forecast to see topline growth in 2022, driven by strong sales in new and emerging markets, such as the populous states of New Jersey and New York,” Bingham said. “The U.S. will continue to dominate global sales over the next few years, but we see potential from emerging global markets such as Germany and Mexico.”

Medical cannabis sales continue to decline, especially in markets that recently legalized adult-use sales like Arizona. “BDSA projects annual dollar sales in Arizona’s medical channel will be 30% lower than the 2021 annual dollar sales total and roughly half the annual sales total seen in 2020—the last full year of medical-only sales,” BDSA states in a press release. “By contrast, the Colorado medical channel still saw modest growth in annual sales for roughly two years after the launch of its adult-use market in 2014.”

On an international scale, larger countries are continuing to ramp up their medical and or recreational cannabis programs. Germany recently hit a roadblock with the concern that an adult-use reform measure might be rejected by the European Union. Mexico decriminalized cannabis last summer, but adult-use cannabis has not yet been legalized. Smaller countries are beginning to take action, such as the U.S. Virgin Islands, which released a draft of medical cannabis rules in August. Bermuda, a territory of the United Kingdom, recently made plans to implement a legalization bill, but it was rejected by U.K. officials.

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Weed Sales Outpace Alcohol for First Time in Massachusetts

Cannabis tax revenue in Massachusetts is performing better than projected, over four years into the state’s adult-use market. According to the most recently available data, Massachusetts reported collecting $74.2 million in marijuana excise taxes—much more than the $51.3 million in alcohol excise taxes that were collected. 

Alcohol sales continue the downward trend that began two decades ago, according to data collected by Gallup polling, despite a temporary sharp uptick in alcohol sales amid COVID. Analysts have wondered if there is a correlation between cannabis reform and alcohol sales.

The trends seen in Massachusetts are no different. Fortune reports that alcohol excise taxes imposed on each gallon of alcohol produced also remained flat over the last five years, at $0.55 per gallon of wine, and $4.05 per gallon of hard alcohol. 

Massachusetts collected over $112 million in adult-use cannabis sales excise tax revenue in 2021—206 percent higher than projected—according to a Monthly Public Meeting presentation from data from the state’s Cannabis Control Commission. 

“This number also underscores the entire agency’s tireless efforts, particularly those of our hardworking staff, to thoughtfully regulate a safe, accessible, and effective adult-use marketplace that keeps critical tenets of our mission—public health, public safety, and equity, among others—front of mind,” Commission Executive Director Shawn Collins said in a statement on January 25. 

The state charges an excise tax of 10.75 percent on the projected retail price of recreational cannabis in addition to a 6.25 percent state sales tax, plus a local tax of up to three percent. 

Cannabis sales are doing much better than anticipated, despite all of the hiccups along the way such as COVID. But analysts say the surge in cannabis sales in Massachusetts comes at no surprise.

Vivien Azer, a Wall Street research analyst and managing director at Cowen who covers the emerging cannabis sector told local news station WCBV that when states convert from medical cannabis to adult-use, it typically leads to a doubling or even tripling of revenues “almost overnight.”

Kicking off recreational cannabis sales in any state is something of a spectacle to be celebrated.

Mikayla Bell, community outreach manager for NETA, one of the largest cannabis retailers in the state. “I think that people are looking for an alternative to make them feel better,” Bell told WCBV. “Oftentimes people are turning to alcohol for relief. And now they found another product with without the hangover, without the calories.”

Cannabis sales in Massachusetts high a milestone last September when sales in the state eclipsed $2 billion.

During the first year of cannabis sales, from November 2018 through 2019, 33 cannabis retailers generated $393.7 million in gross sales. Sales for all of the 2019 calendar year reached $444.9 million. 

In 2020, 91 adult-use cannabis retailers tallied $702 million in gross sales, despite being closed for two months due to the pandemic.

Most states impose a relatively high excise tax rate on cannabis. California’s cannabis tax hike didn’t go over well with legacy growers, for instance. But cannabis isn’t the only industry that faces steep taxes.

Alcohol taxes in Massachusetts could soon see a hike as well. State Representative Kay Khan filed a bill to double the excise taxes on beer, wine and liquor with H 2973. The state spends $2.6 billion each year to combat alcoholism and addiction, and should consider making the industry pay for that themselves.

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Arizona Cannabis Generates Over $1B of Revenue in 2021

Cannabis is officially a billion dollar business in the state of Arizona.

Voters in the Grand Canyon State passed a measure at the ballot in 2020 that made recreational pot legal for adults ages 21 and older. Medical cannabis, meanwhile, has been legal in the state since 2010.

That made 2021 the first year with both markets open for business, and the results were lucrative for Arizona.

According to figures released by the state Department of Revenue, medical and recreational cannabis sales combined to generate more than $1.23 billion in revenue last year.

“Rarely does an industry produce over $1.2 billion in revenue in its first year. This number shows that the legalization of cannabis is something Arizonans believe strongly in and the many benefits it contributes to the state’s economy,” said Samuel Richard, the Executive Director of the Arizona Dispensaries Association (ADA), as quoted by azfamily.com.

The Department of Revenue provided a detailed breakdown of the sales data, revealing that recreational adult-use pot brought in $528,001,278 in revenue, while medical cannabis generated $703,803,194.

According to the figures, November brought in $60,299,191 in adult-use sales, making it the highest-grossing month for recreational pot. It was also the only month of the year in which recreational sales topped $60 million. 

April was the top month for medical cannabis, with $72,944,477 generated then. Complete sales figures for December were not provided.

Moreover, the state raked in $196,447,570 in taxes on the combined sales last year, and that does not include sales in December. 

According to the Arizona Department of Revenue, “there is a transaction privilege tax (TPT) rate and an excise tax (16 percent) on the retail sales” of adult use recreational cannabis in the state.

In 2020, 60 percent of Arizona voters approved Proposition 207, a ballot initiative that legalized recreational pot use in the state. (Arizona was one of four states that year where voters approved legalization measures at the ballot, joining Montana, South Dakota and New Jersey in moving to end prohibition.) 

In August, Arizona launched a social equity program for aspiring cannabis dispensary owners as part of Prop 207’s commitment to “promote the ownership and operation of marijuana establishments and marijuana testing facilities by individuals from communities disproportionately impacted by the enforcement of previous marijuana laws.”

Through the program, the state’s Department of Health Services will award 26 dispensary licenses to applicants who come from communities most adversely affected by anti-drug policies.

“The social equity ownership program is intended to promote the ownership and operation of licensed Marijuana Establishments by individuals from communities disproportionately impacted by the enforcement of previous marijuana laws,” the Department of Health Services explained. “Social equity license holders will be required to comply with all statutes and rules that govern Adult-Use Marijuana Establishment licenses, including obtaining approval to operate before opening their retail location. Additionally, social equity license holders will be required to develop and implement policies to document how the Marijuana Establishment will provide a benefit to one or more communities disproportionately affected by the enforcement of Arizona’s previous marijuana laws.”

But that effort has also faced scrutiny, with a group of female investors filing a lawsuit in November targeting the program. The plaintiffs, a pair of organizations known as the Greater Phoenix Urban League and Acre 41, assert that the rules governing the program are inconsistent with the goals of Prop 207.

Defendants in the suit are the state of Arizona, Republican Gov. Doug Ducey, the state Department of Health Services and Don Herrington, the director of the Department of Health Services.

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Colorado Hits New Record with $423 Million in Annual Revenue From 2021

The state of Colorado is reporting a new record amount of revenue collected during 2021, including update sales data in overall tax and fee revenue collected since 2014 when legal sales began.

The Colorado Department of Revenue (DoR) announced on January 11 that the state has made a new record with total annual cannabis sales. “New record alert! In 2021, Colorado collected over $423 million in revenue from marijuana sales (compared to the previous record of over $387 million in 2020). Colorado also surpassed $2B in tax and fee revenue and $12B in marijuana sales to date,” the agency wrote on its social media pages.

A detailed press release shared that monthly data for December 2021 reached $30,609,563 in tax and fee revenue (with a total of $423,486,053 between January and December 2021) and $2,018,933,005 since February 2014.

Similar in cannabis sales, the latest data revealed $158,462,549 was collected in November (with a total of $2,060,952,959 collected between January and November 2021) and a massive total of $12,039,747,032 collected since legal sales began in January 2014.

These figures are based off of the state sales tax (2.9 percent), cannabis retail sales tax (15 percent) and retail cannabis excise tax (15 percent). The DoR notes that for cannabis sales data, the official sales figures won’t be released until sometime in February 2022.

Sales data from October, November and December were reported to have decreased, with both cannabis sales and prices dropping below the usual rate. The price of smokeable flower per pound in the last three months of 2021 dropped by 28 percent ($1,316 to $948, according to Westword) in reference to the average market rate (AMR). In comparison, the AMR for the end of 2020 reported $1,721 in price per pound.

The states of Washington and California, however, have collected $3 billion and $3.1 billion in tax revenue, compared to Colorado’s newly achieved $2 billion. Of course, Washington’s sales tax is up to 46 percent in certain regions, and California’s sales tax reaches up to 38 percent. Colorado’s tax percent is the third highest in the country.

According to Marijuana Policy Project Policy Director Karen O’Keefe, Colorado’s cannabis industry is more consistent, which leads to steady flow of funds for the state. “When you have that kind of funding, economists say you have what’s called a multiplier effect, where you not only have the initial investment in the stores, the jobs and the tax revenue, but then that money is in people’s pockets who spend it again,” O’Keefe told Westword. “So it’s as if each dollar is two or three dollars, which is the way economists usually look at it.” She also notes that this long-term investing has led to the creation of 40,000 jobs and over 1,000 Colorado businesses.

“Some of the more recently taxed states are focusing on specifically investing a good chunk of the revenue in communities that have borne the brunt of marijuana prohibition and that have had disproportionate marijuana arrests,” O’Keefe continued. “You’ll just continue to see more tax revenue, more people working in the cannabis industry, operating cannabis businesses.”

Colorado’s cannabis industry is thriving in many other ways overall as well. At the beginning of the year, Governor Jared Polis signed an executive order to pardon 1,351 cases relating to cannabis possession convictions of two ounces or less. Psychedelic decriminalization is also ramping up in Colorado, with two potential ballot measures being proposed through New Approach PAC. One bill proposes legalization of multiple different psychedelic substances such as ibogaine, DMT, mescaline, psilocybin and psilocin, whereas the other bill focuses just on psilocybin and psilocin.

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Rochester, New York Mayor-Elect Plans Guaranteed Basic Income From Cannabis Taxes

One of New York’s largest cities could put cannabis tax revenue to work by helping to implement reparations for impoverished communities impacted by the War on Drugs.

First reported by Business Insider, Rochester, New York’s Mayor-Elect Malik Evans plans to fuel his city’s progressive Guaranteed Basic Income (GBI) program with revenue from adult-use cannabis sales, once the state gives the green light to retail sales.

Two weeks ago, Rochester City Council approved a plan for GBI—largely spearheaded by Mayor-Elect Evans following the departure of former Mayor Lovely Warren. The two-year pilot program will provide $500 per month to 175 families that qualify. To qualify, families must live at or below 200 percent of the federal poverty line. They will receive the monthly payment for the span of one year. In recent events, city leadership explained the difference between GBI and Universal Basic Income (UBI).

An additional 175 other families would receive the payments for the second year of the program.  

Rochester joins Ithaca, New York to launch a similar basic income program. Programs also already exist in Newark, New Jersey and Los Angeles, California.

The idea to divert cannabis tax revenue to fund guaranteed basic income shows the connection between two problems.

“Community folks told me, ‘this is a big source of revenue, and Black and brown people are prosecuted worse than others because of marijuana,’” Evans told Business Insider. An often-cited American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) report identifies the double standard that stains American’s justice system—Black people are 3.64 times more likely than white people to be arrested for cannabis possession, despite nearly equal rates of usage. Rochester specifically needs improvement, as 34 percent of Black residents in the city fall into poverty compared to eight percent of white ones.

Rochester’s GBI program will receive funding from President Joe Biden’s American Rescue Plan (ARP), which several cities around the U.S. have used to launch GBI programs. Some programs that launched this year are either using ARP funds, grants from former Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey or state funds to help low income residents. 

Before he assumes the role of Mayor, Evans served as the Rochester City Council’s councilmember-at-large with an extensive background in education and community projects.

“This is an industry with the potential to make millions of dollars,” Evans said. “Everyone wants to start a marijuana business in Rochester.”

To prepare for the eventual rollout of cannabis tax revenue, Evans launched the Rochester Cannabis Preparation Commission last week, so that the city can stay one step ahead, building on the plan of Evans’ predecessor former Mayor Warren.

On March 31, New York legalized adult-use cannabis when former Governor Andrew Cuomo signed legislation, after several years of false starts and other failed efforts.

In a statement, Cuomo called it “a historic day in New York—one that rights the wrongs of the past by putting an end to harsh prison sentences, embraces an industry that will grow the Empire State’s economy, and prioritizes marginalized communities so those that have suffered the most will be the first to reap the benefits.”

Unfortunately, regulation for the sale of cannabis has not yet been finalized, so dispensaries won’t start collecting money for Rochester until those details have been ironed out at the state level first.

Mayor-Elect Evans also plans to ensure an inclusive industry in Rochester. “We’ll have to figure out how we go about setting up our program to make sure we can help entrepreneurs who may not have been involved in the [cannabis industry] in the past,” Evans said.

Cities and towns in New York have until December 31 to opt out of cannabis retail or consumption spaces. Over 400 towns across New York have blocked dispensaries already. Rochester is one of just four municipalities in Monroe County to give the green light. 

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Thursday, April 8, 2021 Headlines | Marijuana Today Daily News

Marijuana Today Daily Headlines
Thursday, April 8, 2021 | Curated by host Shea Gunther

// Virginia moves cannabis legalization to July 1 2021 (Leafly (AP))

// Investigators in Matt Gaetz inquiry looking into Bahamas travel sources say (NBC News)

// Alabama House Committee Approves Medical Marijuana Legalization Bill Already Passed The Senate (Marijuana Moment)


These headlines are brought to you by Atlantic Farms, a Maine-based multistate cannabis business with operations in Maine and Massachusetts. Atlantic Farms is looking for people to help it grow and evolve as investors. Open up TheAtlanticFarms.com for more on the company and email info@theatlanticfarms.com to learn about investment opportunities.


// Texas Lawmakers Tackle Marijuana Decriminalization Medical Cannabis And Hemp In Committee Hearings (Marijuana Moment)

// Plus Products 2020 Revenue Increases 15% to $15.9 Million (New Cannabis Ventures)

// Trulieve Raises C$250 Million Selling Shares at C$50 (New Cannabis Ventures)

// South Carolina Senator Threatens To Block ‘Every Single Other Bill’ If Medical Marijuana Doesn’t Get A Vote (Marijuana Moment)

// Green Thumb poised to build out $50 million cannabis facility in New York (Marijuana Business Daily)

// Denver discusses permanently allowing drive-thru walk-up dispensary sales (Denver Channel 7 ABC)

// States Keep Repeating the Same Mistake With Marijuana Legalization (Slate)

Check out our other projects:Marijuana Today— Our flagship title, a weekly podcast examining the world of marijuana business and activism with some of the smartest people in the industry and movement. • Marijuana Media Connect— A service that connects industry insiders in the legal marijuana industry with journalists, bloggers, and writers in need of expert sources for their stories.

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Wednesday, November 18, 2020 Headlines | Marijuana Today Daily News

Marijuana Today Daily Headlines
Wednesday, November 18, 2020 | Curated by host Shea Gunther

// Cannabis taxes save 350 jobs in Chicago (Leafly)

// Colorado summer cannabis sales thrive despite collapse of state’s tourism industry (Marijuana Business Daily)

// Bidens Marijuana Decriminalization Plan Is ‘Not Enough’ Cory Booker Says In New Documentary (Marijuana Moment)


These headlines are brought to you by All Kind of Portland, Maine, purveyors of fine legal medical marijuana products (and soon adult use!).


// Trulieve Continues To Flex With Strong Revenue (Green Market Report)

// Curaleaf Q3 Revenue Increases 55% to $182 Million (New Cannabis Ventures)

// Canadian producer Supreme Cannabis turns small profit in first quarter (Marijuana Business Daily)

// Illinois cannabis industry seeks end to MMJ-recreational retail relocation rule (Marijuana Business Daily)

// C3 Industries Raises $45M To Support Expansion In Missouri And Massachusetts (Benzinga)

// Aurora moves ahead with ‘social justice’ marijuana delivery plan (Sentinel Colorado)

// FDA Is Hosting A Conference On CBD Sex And Gender This Week (Marijuana Moment)


Check out our other projects:Marijuana Today— Our flagship title, a weekly podcast examining the world of marijuana business and activism with some of the smartest people in the industry and movement. • Marijuana Media Connect— A service that connects industry insiders in the legal marijuana industry with journalists, bloggers, and writers in need of expert sources for their stories.

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Photo: Mia Battaglia/Flickr

Tuesday, August 18, 2020 Headlines | Marijuana Today Daily News

Marijuana Today Daily Headlines
Tuesday, August 18, 2020 | Curated by host Shea Gunther

// Democratic State Treasurers Step Up Marijuana Banking Push Following GOP Attacks (Marijuana Moment)

// Local Marijuana Bans In California Keep Illicit Market Alive And Block Revenue, Study Shows (Marijuana Moment)

// Portland likely to miss out on Maine’s first adult-use marijuana sales (Sun Journal (Press Herald))


These headlines are brought to you by Natural Order Supply, one of the nation’s premier cannabis cultivation supply companies dedicated to streamlining cultivation and helping industrial hemp farmers calculate their price-per-plant cost. They have everything from lights to harvest supplies to cultivation advice!


// Marijuana Activists Ask Supreme Court To Hear Their Case Against DEA (Marijuana Moment)

// Colorado Rec Shoppers Switching Back To Medical (Green Market Report)

// Ownership equity threshold stirs debate at CCC (Taunton Gazette)

// Massachusetts Senate primary begs the question: Which candidate loves legalization least? (Leafly)

// Curaleaf Q2 Revenue Increases 22% sequentially to $117.5 million (New Cannabis Ventures)

// Marijuana company will destroy $2.6 million inventory of year-old vapes (Boston Globe)

// Seth Rogen’s Pandemic PSA: Swap Partying For Weed And Movies (Fresh Toast)


Check out our other projects:Marijuana Today— Our flagship title, a weekly podcast examining the world of marijuana business and activism with some of the smartest people in the industry and movement. • Marijuana Media Connect— A service that connects industry insiders in the legal marijuana industry with journalists, bloggers, and writers in need of expert sources for their stories.

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Friday, February 14, 2020 Headlines | Marijuana Today Daily News

Marijuana Today Daily Headlines
Friday, February 14, 2020 | Curated by host Shea Gunther

// Los Angeles County expunges 66,000 marijuana convictions in a day (Leafly)

// Aurora Cannabis reports steep loss, production drop, and higher costs (Marijuana Business Daily)

// California unions ask state’s Democrats to shut out major cannabis trade group (Marijuana Business Daily)


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// Baker’s anti-stoned driving bill is dead- but marijuana cafes and employee protections move ahead in Legislature (Boston Globe)

// Scientists Find Aluminum Cans Suck Cannabinoids Out of Infused Beverages (Merry Jane)

// Taxes a big factor behind the financial woes of California marijuana companies (Marijuana Business Daily)

// Scotland Opens First Medical Cannabis Clinic to Treat Chronic Pain (Merry Jane)

// A Psychedelics Company Is About to List on a Public Stock Exchange (Merry Jane)

// California ‘vape art’ exhibit flashes bright light on waste issue (Reuters)

// Las Vegas dispensary offers free joints to Nevada primary voters (Leafly)


Check out our other projects:
Marijuana Today— Our flagship title, a weekly podcast examining the world of marijuana business and activism with some of the smartest people in the industry and movement.
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