MDMA – The New Way to Treat PTSD

For sufferers of PTSD, the world can be a scary place. Modern medicine has attempted many ways to treat the disorder ranging from medications to therapy tactics, but they don’t always work. Building evidence shows that alternative remedies like the psychedelic drug MDMA might be a better long-term answer to treat PTSD.

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What is PTSD?

Post traumatic stress disorder is a psychiatric disorder, which means it is diagnosed subjectively. It effects people who have gone through a traumatic experience, whether they were actually a part of it, or just witness to it. This can include things like being physically attacked, witnessing atrocities of war, living through natural disasters, or being the target of bullying or psychological abuse. PTSD is diagnosed separately from other anxiety-based mental illnesses based on the experiencing of a traumatic event.

PTSD was known as ‘shell shock’ during World War I, and was referred to as ‘Battle Fatigue’ after world war II. It is associated with disturbing, and often very intense thoughts concerning past traumas. This can include reliving the event in flashbacks or nightmares, fear, sadness, anger, and feelings of detachment and estrangement from other people. Sufferers of PTSD often display strong negative reactions to situations that others would find non-triggering, and may avoid situations or people entirely that remind them of their past trauma.

Subjective diagnoses make for a difficult time adding up statistics, however, according to psychiatry.org, approximately 3.5% of adults in the US suffer from PTSD per year, and its estimated that about one out of every eleven people will experience PTSD in their lifetime. Women are the predominant sufferers, outnumbering men 2:1, and the three ethnic groups where PTSD symptoms show up the most in the US, are Latinos, African Americans, and Native Americans – all minorities that have experienced a lot of overall violence, intolerance, and general contempt aimed at them throughout history.

medical psychedelics

What is MDMA?

3,4 methylenedioxymethamphetamine, known colloquially as ecstasy, or molly (which is slang for ‘molecular’), is a man made psychoactive drug which is derived from the safrole oil, found primarily in sassafras plants. MDMA has properties of both hallucinogens and stimulants, acting primarily through its interaction with serotonin receptors. It forces the brain to released large amounts of the neurotransmitter, while blocking its reuptake to aid in extra absorption. MDMA comes as either pressed pills, or as a powder that can range from brown to white.

MDMA is known for promoting a feeling of connectedness between people, of reducing fear and anxiety, and increasing feelings of empathy. It was created by Merck Pharmaceutical back in 1912, however its effects were not well understood until the 1970’s when chemist Alexander Shulgin created a new method to synthesize the drug, and tested it out along with a few of his psychotherapist friends. This is around when it started being used in psychotherapy practices, as a treatment method coupled with therapy sessions, known as psychedelic-assisted therapy.

Despite showing usefulness in dealing with mental disorders, MDMA was illegalized in 1985. In 1984, President Ronald Reagan’s administration enacted the Comprehensive Crime Control Act which allowed for emergency banning of drugs by the government. When the subject of MDMA came up in 1985, after other psychedelic drugs had already been illegalized, this act was used to immediately illegalize the compound by placing it in Schedule I of the Convention on Psychotropic Substances treaty, ending therapeutic uses of it.

The illegalization of psychedelics started with smear campaigns during the Vietnam war which culminated in the passage of the Staggers-Dodd bill in 1968 illegalizing LSD and psilocybin specifically. This was followed up with the creation of the Convention on Psychotropic Substances treaty in 1971 which outlawed most of the rest, with the exception of MDMA, which was outlawed later.

While the topic is obviously a controversial one, statements made by John Ehrlichman – former Assistant to the President for Domestic Affairs under President Nixon in 1994, made evident that the war on drugs wasn’t necessarily about drugs at all. Creating further concerns about why drugs like MDMA were illegalized. In his statement he claimed:

“The Nixon campaign in 1968, and the Nixon White House after that, had two enemies: the antiwar left and black people… We knew we couldn’t make it illegal to be either against the war or black, but by getting the public to associate the hippies with marijuana and blacks with heroin, and then criminalizing both heavily, we could disrupt those communities. We could arrest their leaders, raid their homes, break up their meetings, and vilify them night after night on the evening news. Did we know we were lying about the drugs? Of course we did.”

MDMA treat PTSD

MDMA to treat PTSD

So, what do we really know about the ability of MDMA to treat PTSD symptoms? In 2020, a systematic review was released that investigated articles published up until the end of March 2019, that used key terms like ‘treatments for PTSD’ and ‘MDMA pathway’. All articles came through PubMed and ScienceDirect.

It was found in the identification and review of these articles (and their sources) that many small scale investigations had been done that show MDMA aids in reducing psychological trauma. The review authors made a very important point, though. They emphasized that none of the research showed MDMA as a cure for PTSD, as that specifically had not been researched.  What the review was identifying, and what had been studied, was the usefulness of MDMA assisted psychotherapy, and its ability to help people who have been unable to resolve their trauma issues through other avenues.

The big story today with MDMA revolves around currently in-progress trials. As of last summer, the Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies (MAPS) had begun Phase 3 of clinical trials into MDMA. MAPS is conducting double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trials at multiple sites, testing the safety and efficacy of MDMA-assisted therapy for PTSD. The participants are 200-300 PTSD sufferers who are all 18+ in age, but with varied histories to produce their traumatic experiences.

These trials follow the Phase II trials which had promising outcomes, and are the last hurdle required by the US Food & Drug Administration (FDA) in order to be assessed for legalization in the treatment of PTSD. Should it get the pass, MDMA would be able to be prescribed along with therapy, in outpatient settings with residential stays – to allow users to have their experience in a safe and controlled environment.

How likely is the FDA to approve MDMA to treat PTSD? It is, after all, a psychedelic drug in Schedule I, which defines it as highly dangerous with no therapeutic value. Apparently, back in 2017, the FDA identified MDMA as a ‘breakthrough therapy’ for PTSD.

The FDA defines a ‘breakthrough therapy’ as a “drug that treats a serious or life-threatening condition and preliminary clinical evidence indicates that the drug may demonstrate substantial improvement on a clinically significant endpoint(s) over available therapies.” This definition is meant to help speed up research progress in order to get products to market. In 2019, the same designation was made by the FDA for psilocybin in magic mushrooms.

medical MDMA

More about MAPS Phase 3 trials

Phase 3 trials were designed according to an agreed upon Special Protocol Assessment between MAPS and the FDA to make sure trials and outcomes would be in line with regulation. The trials take place at 15 different sites between three countries: the US, Canada, and Israel. Participants receive three therapy sessions with either MDMA or placebo over a 12-week therapy period, along with three preparatory sessions and three integration sessions, without any drugs. The MDMA/placebo sessions are spaced every 3-5 weeks.

The (CAPS-5) – Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale – is the primary measurement tool for success in the study. This is a loosely structured interview used in most PTSD trials, and requires assessment by raters who are ‘blinded’, or do not know where the study participant falls in terms of actual drug or placebo. The study investigators will use other measurement tools as well including, but not limited to: Beck Depression Inventory and Inventory of Psychosocial Functioning.

‘Phase 3’, of course, implies that this is not the beginning of the study. Phase 2 findings of the study indicate the following about MDMA and its ability to treat PTSD: it can cause a reduction in fear and defensiveness; increase introspection and communication, as well as empathy and compassion; and generally improves the therapeutic experience of those suffering from PTSD. Phase 2 consisted of 107 patients.

Two months following the MDMA-assisted treatment in Phase 2, 61% of patients were no longer identified as having PTSD. One year following treatment, 68% no longer qualified as PTSD. All participants had chronic PTSD that was treatment resistant, and had been suffered from for an average of almost 18 years.

Conclusion

It’s getting heated in the race to see which psychedelic drug gets the first US medical legalization (as the US so often sets the standard for other parts of the world). Psilocybin from magic mushrooms is certainly making waves, but it looks like MDMA might take the win. With the FDA already drooling at the mouth to approve, and the pharmaceutical world getting its ducks in a row, it looks like very shortly MDMA will officially be approved to treat PTSD, with a change in global legalization measures likely to follow.

Hello and welcome to CBDtesters.co, your one-stop-shop for all cannabis-related news worldwide. Keep up with us to stay on top of the ever-changing world of legal marijuana, and sign up to our newsletter so you’re always in the know!

Resources

Merry Cannabis! Christmas and Marijuana
Forced Legalizations: EU & France Battle it out Over CBD Laws

Florida Bill Aims to Legalize Medical Magic Mushrooms
Is CBD A Good Solution For PTSD?
What is DELTA 8 THC (FAQ: Great resource to learn about DELTA 8THC)

The New Italian Cannabis Contradiction
Delta 8 Flowers – Milder Than Cannabis, But Very Relaxing and Uplifting
The CBD Flowers Weekly newsletter (your top resource for all things smokable hemp flowers). How to choose Delta-8 THC flowers?  Delta-8 THC Flowers: Everything You Need To Know.
The Medical Cannabis Weekly newsletter (International medical cannabis business report)
How Criminal Organizations Are Dealing with Corona
The Delta 8 Weekly Newsletter (All you need to know about Delta 8 thc) and the Best Delta 8 THC Deals. Best Delta-8 THC Vape Bundles – Winter 2021 Denver Residents Vote to Decriminalize “Magic Mushrooms”
Cannabis and the South: How Things Change Plant Power: Everyday Plants That Activate the Endocannabinoid System Ask A Doctor – General CBD/PTSD Discussion
The New Rise of Medical Psychedelics
New Jersey Wants Home Cultivation for Cannabis   Is Medical Cannabis A Solution For Veteran PTSD Suicide Epidemic? Nature’s Magic – The Health Benefits of Psilocybin Mushrooms

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Can LSD Treat Your Mental Illness?

For several decades, psychedelics have been uniformly outlawed, with massive campaigns from the late 1900’s used to raise fear and controversy over their effects. Now, as the world acclimates to the medical and recreational use of cannabis, psychedelics are being looked at once again for their medical benefits. In fact, one of the leading points of research is the use of LSD to treat mental illness.

When it comes to psychedelics, cannabis is one of the most popular, and its not hard to see why. THC has medical benefits and makes people feel good. However, for some people, regular THC is just too much. If you’re one of those people, check out our Delta-8 THC deals, and experience THC with slightly less psychoactive effect, and less anxiety.

What is LSD?

LSD, known more scientifically as Lysergic acid diethylamide, is a hallucinogenic psychedelic drug, which was first synthesized in 1938 by Swiss chemist Albert Hoffman. He was also the first person to experience its effects when he accidentally ingested a small amount in 1943. As a psychedelic, it is known for altering perception, feelings, and thoughts, as well as causing visions and sensations that are not actually there (hallucinations). LSD is in a class of drugs called ergolines which are often used to treat disorders like Parkinson’s. Unlike some compounds like DMT, LSD is manmade, though derived from the ergot fungus.

How exactly LSD works to cause the effects its associated with, is still not completely defined. However, certain aspects have been found in research. In one study put out in 2017 from the University of North Carolina, it was found that LSD interacts with serotonin receptors. Serotonin is a neurotransmitter that plays a big role in mood and brain communication. The particular receptor it effects is called 5-HT2AR. One of the interesting things that happens when LSD attaches to this receptor, is that the receptor closes over the molecule, preventing it from leaving quickly. This could very well explain why the drug can last for many hours, even after it has left the bloodstream.

The serotonin receptor it attaches to can activate two signaling pathways through G-proteins and β-arrestins within cells. With LSD, it primarily works through the β-arrestins. The researchers on this study found that different drugs in the ergoline group effect serotonin receptors differently, and found evidence that the compounds themselves can modify the structure of the receptor in order to activate different effects.

Research

There has actually been plenty of research into how LSD can aide in the treatment of mental illness. Back in 2014, a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study was done to investigate how safe and effective LSD is in treating the anxiety experienced by patients with life-threatening illnesses.

12 patients were used in the study, and they were given drug-free psychotherapy sessions, along with two psychotherapy sessions with LSD. A two-month follow-up showed a positive trend according to the (STAI) State-Trait Anxiety Inventory in terms of reductions in trait and state anxiety. The reductions in anxiety related to the LSD were sustained for 12 months. No serious adverse effects were noticed, and minimal adverse effects subsided within one day. The overall outcome of the study was LSD safely decreased anxiety.

In a systematic review of LSD in psychiatry, 11 studies were identified  concerning LSD and mental health that consisted of randomized and controlled clinical trials. These were done between the years of 1950-1970 when it was not illegal to use LSD in medical testing, and when LSD was regularly studied for use with addiction, anxiety, depression, and psychosomatic diseases. As part of the 11 studies that made the cut, 567 subjects were administered LSD in doses of 20 to 800 micrograms. The overall finding was that LSD has positive results in psychiatric symptoms, particularly for alcoholism. A grand majority of the study authors from the review cited positive, if short-term, improvements. This was not always seen in long-term follow-ups.

LSD in the treatment of mental illness today

Yet another systematic review was done on studies into LSD from after 1970. This review, called the Modern Clinical Research on LSD was published in 2017. The review looked at five recent studies in London, Zurich and Basel. All studies were placebo controlled. The London studies were single-blind, non-randomized, the Switzerland studies were randomized, double-blind. In all studies, low-moderate doses of LSD were used between 40-80 micrograms. (It takes about 100-200 micrograms for a full LSD effect).

In terms of subjective effects according to validated psychometric scales, the response in controlled settings was mainly positive. Average group ratings for liking the drug and having positive effects reached 90% of the maximum possible on the VAS scale after 200 micrograms had been administered. At 200 micrograms, only a small percentage increase was made for the average of those who had a negative drug effect (<25%), however negative ratings did go up with the increase.

No high levels of anxiety or panic occurred, necessitating no sedation of patients to stave off negative effects. The main feelings experienced during testing were: bliss, altered perceptions, audiovisual synesthesia (think crossed wires and mixed-up responses), and derealization and depersonalization in positive ways. Higher doses included more insightfulness.

LSD for mental illness

In terms of the synesthesia, LSD produced spontaneous experiences, indicating it alters spontaneous processes, rather than creating an induced response. At under 100 micrograms, LSD promoted suggestibility, and at 200 micrograms it inspired mystical experiences during psychotherapy combined with LSD. Similar studies that have been done on psilocybin have shown that more intense mystical experiences are tied to long-term positive benefits.

However, these mystical effects were correlated at a high level with blissful states as well, meaning the long-term response could be more related to blissful experiences than mystical ones. In these studies, LSD promoted feelings of happiness, well-being, openness, closeness to other people, and trust.

In terms of negative effects, they generally didn’t last more than 10-24 hours, and included headache, difficulty with concentration, decrease in appetite, dizziness, dry mouth, nausea, exhaustion and feeling unbalanced. No severe adverse responses were noticed in any of the modern testing. LSD, in general, is considered non-toxic physically.

Why is it illegal?

When looking at all the positive scientific research, and the lack of detrimental side effects, it starts to look very strange that LSD has been illegalized, while pharmaceutical medications to treat the same things often have lower success rates and harsher side effects. While the US government might stick with a tagline of psychedelics being dangerous and having no medical value, there is another underlying story which makes a bit more sense.

LSD and psilocybin were first illegalized in the late 60’s after a years long smear campaign which coincided with the Vietnam war. America was off fighting a battle that didn’t technically involve it, and causing a massive death toll, and unspeakable and unnecessary violence and destruction to residents of Vietnam.

There was already a pretty heavy anti-war movement during that time. Want to speculate on how much bigger and harder to control that would’ve been if the country was focusing on the war as it should have been? The question of why America wanted to be in that war so badly is a whole debate in and of itself, but regardless of the ‘why’s, there are still some heavy truths. In 1994, a guy named John Ehrlichman, who had been the Assistant to the President for Domestic Affairs in Nixon’s administration, made this statement:

psychedelics

“The Nixon campaign in 1968, and the Nixon White House after that, had two enemies: the antiwar left and black people. You understand what I’m saying? We knew we couldn’t make it illegal to be either against the war or black, but by getting the public to associate the hippies with marijuana and blacks with heroin, and then criminalizing both heavily, we could disrupt those communities. We could arrest their leaders, raid their homes, break up their meetings, and vilify them night after night on the evening news. Did we know we were lying about the drugs? Of course we did.”

Is it really any wonder that in 1968 the US passed the Staggers-Dodd bill illegalizing both LSD and psilocybin? Or that in 1971 the Convention on Psychotropic Substances treaty gave it a Schedule I ranking? And is it really any wonder that this was heavily pushed for by richer countries with developed pharmaceutical industries, while poorer countries that didn’t have industries that could benefit the same way, were against the illegalization?

What now?

Things can change easily from good to bad, but they can also change from bad to good. Growing scrutiny towards agencies like the DEA for blocking scientific discovery in order to restrict access, and a renewed interest in medical testing, has re-opened the door which had been closed on LSD. Last month, the company MindMed even announced the beginning of the very first clinical trial ever to incorporate LSD and MDMA to test the possible benefits in dealing with mental illness.

Mindmed is a biotech company specializing in medicines and therapies using psychedelics. The trials are being done in Switzerland, which has been the base for a lot of psychedelics testing. Considering it’s a biotech company doing them, the logic answer would be that they want to make a product to sell eventually. My guess is, by the time they’re ready, it’ll be more legal globally to make LSD products to treat mental illness. After all, think about how fast the cannabis industry changed in the last few years.

Conclusion

The ongoing legalizations of cannabis, which is also a psychedelic, though a much less intense one, do signal a change in things. LSD has shown a spectacular profile for aiding in mental illness, with so few adverse reactions, that its silly what people are taking instead. It’s hard to say what the future holds, but it might very soon be the legalization for LSD medically.

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Resources

Cannabis and Schizophrenia – Not a Testable Hypothesis
Forced Legalizations: EU & France Battle it out Over CBD Laws

Is Delta-8 THC Legal? What Does The Law Says? Is CBD Effective for Treating Bipolar Disorder?
Everything You Need to Know About Kratom
What is DELTA 8 THC (FAQ: Great resource to learn about DELTA 8THC)

The New Italian Cannabis Contradiction
Merry Cannabis! Christmas and Marijuana
The CBD Flowers Weekly newsletter (your top resource for all things smokable hemp flowers). How to choose Delta-8 THC flowersDelta-8 THC Flowers: Everything You Need To Know.
The Medical Cannabis Weekly newsletter (International medical cannabis business report)
Relax: How CBD Can Reduce Anxiety
The Delta 8 Weekly Newsletter (All you need to know about Delta 8 thc) and the Best Delta 8 THC Deals.  Best Delta-8 THC Vape Bundles – Winter 2021 Gallup Poll Finds Americans Use CBD Mostly For Pain Management
Using CBG To Treat Clinical Depression The New Rise of Medical Psychedelics America Is Cannabis Friendly – It’s Official
A Complete Look At Cannabis and Depression
Will Cannabis Tourism Be Over in Amsterdam?   Compared to Prescription Medication, Medical Cannabis Not Always Affordable Alternative
CBD’s Role in the Treatment of Multiple Mental Health Disorders

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The Bizarre History and Promising Future of Delta 10 THC

Yes, you read that right. We have another form of THC to explore – meet Delta 10 THC, a new cannabinoid with a short but interesting history.

Delta 10 THC is one of the hundreds of cannabinoids found in cannabis. But unlike some of the bigger names like CBD, Delta 9 THC, CBG, CBN and Delta-8 THC, Delta 10 is not a naturally occurring plant compound, although it does start off that way.

This molecular sibling does have many commonalities with Delta 9 and Delta 8 tetrahydrocannabinols, but there are some key differences as well. Let’s explore what we know about Delta 10 THC so far, and why it’s important for you as a consumer and for the industry as a whole.

Did you know you can legaly buy Delta-8 THC online?
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The Bizarre Formation of Delta 10 THC

As with many of the nation’s cannabis trends, Delta 10 THC started in California too. However, this time, it was purely accidental. A company called Fusion Farms out of Adelanto, CA, bought some outdoor flower to manufacture concentrates. As many already know, California is subject to almost annual, very large wildfires; and unbeknownst to Fusion Farms, the biomass they purchased was contaminated with fire retardant.

Since they were unaware of the contamination, they continued with the extraction as planned but after the distillation process, unusual crystals began to form. These crystals had a completely different structure than previously observed cannabinoid crystals. After conducting some laboratory tests, it was determined that these crystals were most similar to CBC (cannabichromene), but still not an exact match. They continued testing this structure against all the known cannabinoids and no match was found. This went on for several months.

Eventually, they discovered that it was yet another variation of tetrahydrocannabinol, formed because of plant exposure to those fire retardants – Delta 10 THC. So basically, D10 is an artificial cannabinoid, formed by converting D9 or other cannabinoids using some type of catalyst. In this case, it was fire retardant, but companies are looking at various greener methods to created Delta 10 THC, like certain food-grade additives.

In chemistry, “Delta” refers to the double bond in a compound’s molecular structure. Delta compounds have more electrons and will interact with the body in a different way than single bond cannabinoids. The difference between the Delta THC analogues comes down to where the double bond is located on their chain of carbon atoms. Delta 8 has this bond on the 8th carbon chain, Delta 9 on the 9th chain, and Delta 10 THC has the double bond on the 10th carbon chain. It seems like a small difference, but from a chemical standpoint, it’s substantial.

How Does Delta 10 THC Effect the Body?

Honestly, it’s hard to say. Because this cannabinoid is so new, there is really no concrete information on how it effects the body and what medical benefits it could provide. I think it’s safe to assume that the effects will be similar to other tetrahydrocannabinols, and that it will likely interact with the body’s CB1 and CB2 receptors in a similar way.

However, that’s just educated speculation at this point. All that we can say for sure is that Delta 10 THC is less psychoactive than Delta 9 and even Delta 8, though not by much for the latter. It’s likely that you will need higher concentrations of Delta 10 to achieve the same results you would get from the other THCs.

Once the laws open up more, scientists will be able to legally study cannabis and will have more funding and equipment to do so. Right now, most of the studies are coming out of Israel, but since this compound was only recently created in the United States, it has not yet been researched out there.

Notes From an Organic Chemist

A few important notes from Josh Jones, Ph.D., organic chemist and founder of Jonesing Labs LLC., who consults with Fusion Farms. “The first thing I wanted to see was nuclear magnetic resonance [NMR] for the unknown crystal,” he began. NMR spectroscopy is an analytical method used to study different chemical structure.

“If you have a purified substance, NMR allows you to ‘see’ the structure of a molecule. It’s a wonderful tool,” says Josh. “Prior to this NMR data, a lot of people had been seeing this mystery compound show up as a minor component on their distillate COAs, but they thought it was CBC,” Josh said.

“Without having a certified reference standard for Δ10-THC, typical HPLC analysis can misidentify Δ10-THC as CBC or CBL (cannabicyclol.) We looked a bit deeper at the HPLC data, especially using 2D HPLC scans, which show absorbance at multiple UV wavelengths.”

“We then saw a difference between the isolated Δ10-THC and standards for CBC and CBL. In combination, the 2D HPLC and NMR data make a strong case for identifying Δ10-THC as the unknown crystals formed in Fusion Farms’ distillate. Then, as luck would have it, a certified Δ10-THC reference standard was released, which agreed with the GC and mass spectrometry data we collected.”

It was Josh’s lab that found an accurate method for identifying Delta 10 THC, compared standard methods that would mistake this compound for CBC or CBL.

Can Delta 10 THC Get You High?

Short answer, yes. All THC products have psychoactive properties, and thus, can get you high. Delta 9 is going to be the strongest, which is great for some but can cause paranoia and anxiety in others. Delta 8 has similar effects to Delta 9 but is a bit less potent, less intense, and is said to be a great sleep aid.

Delta 10 is similar to Delta 8 when it comes to levels of potency (although some analysis indicates that is a bit less powerful), but where D8 is great for sleep, D10 will make you feel more alert, creative, and energetic.

Since this is a very new cannabinoid and there aren’t many delta 10 products available for the average consumer, you’re not going to find a lot of firsthand reports of how Delta 10 made them feel just yet. We can expect that to change over the coming weeks, as many industry professionals have noticed there is interest in Delta 10 and are working on making products as we speak.

It’s also important to mention that Delta 10 THC will show up on a urinalysis drug test and will probably not be differentiated from Delta 9. So if there is a reason you can’t consume Delta 9 THC, you should also stay away from Delta 8 and Delta 10.

What Does the Future Hold?

“We’ve been selling thousands of Delta-8 products a day,” said David Reckles from Private Label Hemp Lab. “And based on the feedback from Delta-10 so far, we’re ramping production to prepare for a similarly soaring demand. We think Delta-8 and Delta-10 have the power to turn the CBD market on its head.”

“Many People don’t just want CBD for its natural wellness benefits. They want something to take the edge off. They want to feel noticeably more relaxed and they don’t want to have to get a medical cannabis card to do it. For these self-helpers, CBD alone isn’t always enough. Now that Delta-8 and Delta-10 are available, people are starting to realize these compounds are on a whole other level. Why would people want to go back to the CBD?” David continued.  

The only problem here is that Delta 10 THC might be illegal. Cannabis laws are complicated and according to the DEA, “All synthetically derived tetrahydrocannabinols remain schedule I controlled substances.” The issue with that statement is the DEA has not defined what constitutes “synthetically derived.” Since Delta 10 is synthetically derived from natural compounds, it definitely falls into a grey area.

That said, numerous companies are already moving forward with Delta 10 THC production using legal and compliant, hemp-derived CBD. “You can create any delta you want–Delta-8, Delta-9, or Delta-10–by chemically altering CBD isolate or CBD crude. If you’re using crude CBD, you’ll generally create the reaction through carbon, and vitamin C derivatives. If you’re using an isolate, you’ll incorporate solvents and acids,” David added.

Importance of Lab Testing Delta 10 THC

Similar to CBD, Delta 9, and other cannabinoids, Delta 10 THC is measured via Ultra High Performance Liquid Chromatography, but lab employees need to make sure they are keeping up with the latest industry standards to ensure they’re accurately differentiating Delta 10 from CBC and CBL, as mentioned previously.

Delta 10 THC products aren’t like smokable flower or naturally extracted cannabinoids. Delta 10 needs some type of additive to be created, and if these products aren’t made with the proper knowledge, testing, and supervision, companies could be creating bunk products that will make people sick with dangerous toxins like pesticides and residual solvents.

Always look for a Certificate of Analysis (COA) before buying cannabis products online. This will ensure your safety and you can make sure you’re not getting ripped off with products that won’t have the promised effects.

What Type of Delta 10 THC Products are Available?

At this point in time, you won’t find many Delta-10 products on the market. But companies already plan to launch an assortment of Delta-10 items by the end of spring. Different product options will include:

  • Disposable pens
  • Vape cartridges
  • Gummies
  • Tincture / oil 
  • Dabbing syringes
  • Chocolate bars
  • Shatter 
  • Flower and prerolls

As soon as some of these products are on the market, we will make sure to lock in the best discounts for our readers. Make sure to subscribe to The Delta 8 Weekly Newsletter for more information and exclusive deals on legal THC products.

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CBDH, a new cannabinoid for pain, has been found in cannabis

We reported on the much-discussed scientific discovery of a THC analog thirty times more efficacious than the infamous D9-THC. An earlier study found THCP, as well as CBDP, which are larger forms of THC and CBD, respectively. Now, the same team of researchers from Italy bridged a gap between regular CBD and CBDP. They found […]

The post CBDH, a new cannabinoid for pain, has been found in cannabis appeared first on Latest Cannabis News Today – Headlines, Videos & Stocks.

Everything You Need to Know About Kratom

Kratom (Mitragyna speciosa) is a flowering evergreen tree related to the coffee plant. It is indigenous to Southeast Asia but has been gaining popularity in western culture for its stimulating and pain-relieving effects. Kratom is used both recreationally and therapeutically, and just like cannabis, it’s incredibly controversial.

For quite some time now, the US Drug Enforcement Agency has been trying to add kratom to the Schedule I list of controlled substances. The available government information, plus a handful of misguided university studies, peg kratom as a “dangerous” plant with no known medical benefits. However, as a lifelong cannabis user, and someone who has watched weed transform from illegitimate and “dangerous” to a trending wellness product, I can say with certainty that we’re not getting the full story about kratom either.

When it comes to firsthand accounts from others, as well as my own personal experiences with the plant, and the hundreds of reports I’ve read online – everything indicates that kratom has therapeutic benefits that are worth investigating. As a matter of fact, the most common concern among consumers had nothing to do with the plant itself, but rather what will happen to them when they no longer have access to kratom products.

Kratom is made up of dozen of alkaloids, compounds which are known to hold medicinal value and have been studied independently for decades. Quite a few independent studies have noted the pharmaceutical potential of Kratom.

That’s not to say there are no risks. But, as is the case with any consumable product, some people may experience unexpected, adverse effects while the overwhelming majority do not. For the most part, people largely support the use of kratom and feel it’s vital to their quality of life – and when people talk, I think it’s important for us to listen.

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The chemistry behind the plant

Although scientific literature on Kratom is scarce, it’s been around for a while and has piqued the interest of a few select researchers from around the world. What we do know that a total of 26 alkaloids have been isolated from kratom, and many of these compounds have been studied individually.

Alkaloids are a class of basic, naturally occurring organic compounds that contain at least one nitrogen atom. They are produced by a large variety of organisms including bacteria, fungi, plants, and animals and can be purified from crude extracts of these organisms by acid-base extraction, or solvent extractions followed by silica-gel column chromatography. Alkaloids have a wide range of pharmacological activities and a lot of research to back this  up.

The most abundant alkaloid in Kratom is mitragynine, and for decades it was also believed to be the most potent. Then in 2002, a group of Japanese researchers found a variant called 7-hydronitragynine was discovered. This minor compound is extremely potent, more powerful than morphine, and despite being found only in trace amounts, it’s responsible for most of kratom’s pain-fighting properties. Further research has determined that both alkaloids act as partial opioid receptor agonists by activating the supraspinal mu- and delta- opioid receptors. 

Kratom’s many chemical compounds

The alkaloid structure of kratom bares many similarities to those of other psychedelic drugs like LSD and psilocybin, but no mind-altering effects of that nature have even been reported after kratom use. Rather, kratom can be energizing and increase focus at low doses, and act as a depressant at higher doses. Regardless of the amount ingested, a certain level of pain relief can also be expected, thanks to kratom’s many alkaloid compounds.

Researchers have been able to isolate the following 26 alkaloids from kratom: Ajmalicin, 7-acetoxymitragynine, Corynantheidin, Corynoxein, Corinoxin, 3-Dehydromitragynin, (-)-Epicatechin, 3-Isocorynantheidin, 3-Isopaynanthein, Isomitraphyllin, Isospeciofolin, Isospecionoxein, Mitraciliatin, Mitrafolin, Mitragynalin , Mitraphylin, Mitraspecin, Mitraversin, Paynanthein, Speciociliatin, Speciofolin, Speciogynin, Specionoxein, Speciogynin, Speciofolin, and Stipulatin.

In total, kratom actually contains over 40 chemical compounds, but we’ll narrow it down to the three most important ones, 7-Hydroxymitragynine, Mitragynine and (-)-Epicatechin.

7-HYDROXYMITRAGYNINE

7-Hydroxymitragynine is technically a minor compound in kratom, but it’s by far the most potent, making it the main active ingredient in kratom powders and other products. This alkaloid has opioid agonistic activity and interacts with the three major opioid sites Kappa, Delta and Mu.

MITRAGYNINE

Mitragynine is an indole alkaloid that was isolated for the first time by D. Hooper in 1907. It’s the most abundant compound in kratom, and until 2002 was believed to be the most potent, although the latter turned out to not be the case. Small doses bind to the Delta receptors and act as a stimulant, while larger doses bind to the Mu receptors and have sedative effects.

(-)-EPICATECHIN

Epicatechin is a versatile flavanol that has anti-inflammatory effects and can help protect against free radicals. Epicatechin is one of the most abundant flavonoids present in different fruits such as apples, blackberries, broad beans, cherries, grapes, pears, raspberries, cocoa, and tea leaves.

History of kratom use

Kratom use spans back centuries and it’s hard to argue with a plant that has existed around humans for so long and has so many people and from different regions and cultures advocating for it.

As with most of the existing natural and holistic remedies, kratom use can be traced back to traditional Eastern medicine. Historically, in regions such as the Philippines and New Guinea, the chopped leaves were chewed or brewed into tea by local manual laborers who needed to stave fatigue and improve productivity at work. Additionally, various kratom preparations have been used during social and religious ceremonies and to treat numerous different medical conditions.

In Western literature, Kratom was first noted in the early 19th century but Dutch botanist Willem Korthals, who worked for the East India Company, an English company formed for to exploit trade options between the Middle East, Southeast Asia, and India. Researcher E. M. Holmes also referred to Kratom’s use as an opium substitute, identifying it specifically as Mitragyna speciosa in 1895.

Medical benefits

Again, official studies on kratom are lacking, but a recent survey of more than 2,700 self-reported users conducted by Johns Hopkins University found that a large majority of people are using this plant to alleviate pain. They also concluded that kratom “likely has a lower rate of harm and abuse” than prescription opioids, which are responsible for almost 50,000 deaths in the United States every year.

In a report on the findings, published in the Feb. 3 issue of Drug and Alcohol Dependence, the researchers caution that “ while self-reporting surveys aren’t always entirely reliable, they confirmed that kratom is not regulated or approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and that scientific studies have not been done to formally establish safety and benefits.”

According to American Kratom Association (AKA), a consumer advocacy group, an estimated 10 to 16 million people in the U.S. are using kratom regularly. Kratom is full of alkaloids, which are present in many aspects of human life, including much of what we consume. Alkaloids have showed anti-inflammatory, anticancer, analgesics, local anesthetic and pain relief, neuropharmacologic, antimicrobial, antifungal, and many other activities

Benefits of kratom use include but are not limited to: elevated mood, increased energy, healthy and restful sleep, boosted energy, muscle relaxation, natural aphrodisiac, eliminate social anxiety, pain relief, and it can be used to help minimize the symptoms of withdrawal from illicit drugs.  

Risks and adverse reactions

The jury is still out on what exactly the risks of kratom are, and whether they outweigh the benefits or not. Clueless researchers who have no firsthand experience with the plant say “yes” the risks are far too great, whereas anecdotes from people who have been using kratom regularly for years say “no” it’s totally safe and beneficial for overall wellness and quality of life.

That said, some people actually do have negative reactions to kratom such as high blood pressure and seizures. I feel like it’s important to emphasize that this can happen with anything though, just like people can have allergic or other physical reactions to perfectly healthy foods and natural compounds.

Data from the Poison Control states that, between 2011 and 2017, call centers in the United States received about 1,800 reports that involved kratom use – although many of them were more a combination of paranoia and hypochondria rather then any real physical symptoms. Additional side effects can include dry mouth, dizziness, drowsiness, hallucinations, shortness of breath, and chills.

In the same vein as other pain medications, problems with negative side effects typically occur when kratom is used in unusually high doses or for a prolonged period of time. From what I’ve read, all of the negative experiences with kratom involved the use of highly concentrated extracts, not the bulk powered or teas that most people are using.

Final thoughts

So, now that you’re more informed on the inner workings of this natural pain reliever, you’re probably wondering if kratom is right for you. Ultimately, that’s up to you to decide, but it’s certainly a sought-after, natural pain-reliever for anyone who doesn’t have a medical condition that would prevent them from using kratom.

What are your experiences with the plant? What are your favorite kratom products? If you have an opinion on the matter, we would love to hear more from you! Drop us a line in the comment section below and don’t forget to subscribe to the CBD Flowers Weekly Newsletter for more information on flowers and exclusive deals on flowers and other products.  

The post Everything You Need to Know About Kratom appeared first on CBD Testers.

Plant Power: Everyday Plants That Activate the Endocannabinoid System

When people hear about cannabinoids, they automatically think of cannabis (which makes sense, given the name). What most have yet to realize is that many other plants make cannabinoids too – a lot of everyday flowers, vegetables, and spices that you probably wouldn’t expect.

This train of thought was not exclusive to consumers though; until recently, even scientists had only been able to identify cannabinoids in the cannabis plant. But current studies have found these compounds in a handful of common, day-to-day plants, including clove, black pepper, cocoa, echinacea, broccoli, ginseng, hops, and even carrots.

But no matter how much of these plants you consume, they won’t feel any type of psychedelic effects. This is because they don’t have the cannabinoids we’re all familiar with, like tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), cannabidiol (CBD), or cannabigerol (CBN). Rather, they have their own compounds that directly engage our Endocannabinoid Systems (ECS).

The ECS is itself only recently discovered, and understanding how different phytocannabinoids interact with this network of neurotransmitters in our bodies can lead to important medical innovations in the future. Ones that are natural, safer for patients, and more focused on plant-based healthcare.

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Pain-relieving drugs made from plants

­Chronic pain affects at least 10 percent of the global population, which is approximately 60 million people. However, experts estimate that figure to be closer to 20-25 percent on some countries and regions. Finding a solution that doesn’t put patients at risk for addiction and addition problems, is paramount.

As we humans have done since the dawn of time, we continue looking to the plant world for ways to improve our health and wellbeing. Cannabinoids might be the trendiest at the moment, but they’re certainly not the only plant-based compound that’s been utilized to help fight pain.

Opiates

Opiates get a bad rap because of their high rate for addiction and abuse, but they do have an important place in the world of medicine. Very intense pain, post-surgical or from a broken bone for example, typically won’t respond to cannabinoids. Something stronger like morphine, codeine, and other opiate drugs are sometimes necessary. They have many added ingredients these days, but believe-it-or-not, these medicates have a natural element to them. Opiates are made from opium, which comes from the poppy plant. Just like cannabinoids, these pharmaceutical drugs interact with opiate receptors in the human brain, which is why they can be incredibly effective when used responsibly.

Aspirin

Dating back to ancient Egypt, tea made from the willow tree was used to manage pain and reduce fever. Fast forward a few centuries and scientists are looking at the willow tree yet again, this time isolating the active compound used in that ancient tea – salicylic acid – and used it to formulate numerous medications used to treat pain and inflammation; most notably, aspirin. Salicylic acid is also a very common active ingredient in acne medication.

Anesthetics

Common anesthetics like lidocaine, used routinely by dentists to numb the mouth before initializing treatment, are also distantly related to wild plant – Coca. The leaves of the coca plant were used in the ancient Incan Empire in South America to treat many different levels of pain, from headaches to fractures. Eventually, the coca plant gave way to the drug cocaine, which is an illegal drug of abuse but also a very effective anesthetic.   

Plant cannabinoids and the endocannabinoid system

Cannabis has been used medicinally for centuries, but it wasn’t until recently that science started to catch up with what our ancestors have been telling us. Ancient texts from China, Egypt, Tibet, and many other parts of the world hail cannabis as a natural remedy for numerous ailments including pain, inflammation, nausea, anxiety, epilepsy, and even sexual dysfunction. But how can one plant serve so many different functions in the human body? It all boils down to a network of receptors and neurotransmitters known as the Endocannabinoid System (ECS).

Unfortunately, the federally illegal status of cannabis and its use as a recreational drug has been a major hinderance on the ability of researchers to study the full capabilities of this plant. Until recently, most of the information we had came from scientists in Israel, where they had less restrictions when it came to using the plant compounds medicinally.

The Endocannabinoid System (ECS) is involved in multiple physiological processes including appetite regulation, pain threshold, sleep/wake cycles, memory, and mood. It plays a major role in allowing our bodies to achieve homeostasis, or internal balance. The discovery of the ECS shed new light on how and why plant-based cannabinoids, or phytocannabinoids, affect humans in the way they do. In cannabis alone, over 80 phytocannabinoids have been indexed and these compounds exist in many, many plants we consume regularly.

Other plants that engage the ECS

Like cannabis, many other plants have compounds that engage the endocannabinoid system, and with growing attention on this newly-discovered system, the more sources of phytocannabinoids we have the better. While these other plants don’t have cannabinoids as we know them, many of them contains Alkylamides, compounds that are structurally similar to endocannabinoids, and terpenes, that give plants their unique aromas – both of which effectively activate the ECS.

Plants of interest include (but not limited to):

  • Black pepper
  • Hops
  • Helichrysum
  • Oregano
  • Cinnamon
  • Carrots
  • Basil
  • Cloves
  • Lavender
  • Rosemary
  • Cocoa
  • Echinacea
  • Black truffles
  • Electric daisies
  • Liverwort
  • Kava

More about plant terpenes

Worth an additional mention since they often work synergistically with cannabinoids, in addition to activating the endocannabinoid system indirectly. Terpenes are a very large and diverse class of organic compounds that are produced by a wide variety of plants, including the ones listed above. In cannabis, they are secreted by the same glands that produce some of the more dominant cannabinoids including THC and CBD. Their role and effects are quite different, however.

Terpenes are aromatic plant oils that, when combined with other plant compounds, create a never-ending palate of scents and flavors. In nature, terps serve as a defense mechanism by deterring herbivores and by attracting predators and parasites that attack herbivores.

Chemically, terpenes are hydrocarbons, and they differ from terpenoids, which typically have added functional groups such as oxygen. The words “terpenes” and “terpenoids” are often used interchangeably but this is incorrect. Terpenes are also the major component of rosin, which a sap/waxy-like substance that is produced when cannabis buds are placed under high heat and pressure. Climate, weather, age and maturation, fertilizers, soil type, and light cycles can have an impact on the development of terpenes.

As far as cannabis goes, terpenes are the key to differentiating the effects and flavor of a strain. Some terpenes are relaxing, like those found in lavender, while others are energizing, like citrus. Some smell fruity, some are piney, others are musky, or even floral. There really is no limit to the variation. So far, over 100 different terpenes have been discovered in cannabis plants alone, and each strain typically has its own unique blend and composition of terps.

Terpenes have long been known to hold great therapeutic value, and some of the more common ones have been studied more extensively, considering they’re found in many different types of legal plants. More research is needed to determine the extent of their medicinal effects when combined with other cannabis plant compounds.

Conclusion

No matter how many veggies you munch on, or how many spices you add to your dish, you won’t get high from it like you would with actual cannabis. Our everyday plants don’t have THC, CBD, or any of the other major cannabinoids, but they have their own structurally similar compounds that engage with our Endocannabinoid Systems and can offer us natural, medicinal possibilities well beyond what science ever believed would be possible.

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RESOURCES:

It Was Just a Matter of Time: GMO Cannabis on Its Way
Compared to Prescription Medication, Medical Cannabis Not Always Affordable Alternative
A Brief History Of CBD The Week in Review: Canadian Cannabis, Antibiotic Resistance, Father’s Day Gift Ideas, and more
Can You Treat COVID-19 With CBD and Reduce Mortality Rates? A New Israeli Research Believes You Can!

Not Just for Getting High – The Underreported Medical Uses of THC
In a world plagued with antibiotic resistance, look to cannabis as a natural alternative
The CBD Flowers Weekly newsletter (your top resource for all things smokable hemp flowers)
The Medical Cannabis Weekly newsletter (International medical cannabis business report)
Cannabis Heroes of History: How Robert Randall Beat the U.S.

The Delta 8 Weekly Newsletter (All you need to know about Delta 8 thc) and the Best Black Friday Delta 8 THC Deals 2020.  The best delta-8 THC deals, coupons and discounts.
The Medical Cannabis Weekly Review: Antibiotic Resistance, Cannabis in Italy, CBD for Weight Loss, and more Argentina Allows Cannabis Self-Cultivation
CBG Study Shows Antimicrobial Properties of Cannabis

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Cannabis for Eating Disorders Like Anorexia

It almost sounds counterintuitive to say it, but yet another possible application of cannabis is in the treatment of eating disorders like anorexia nervosa and bulimia. It’s quite possible that the ability of marijuana to build an appetite, while also helping with symptoms of anxiety, makes it a great treatment option for those suffering from certain eating disorders.

The new rage in the world of cannabis is the addition of delta-8 THC. Slightly different than delta-9, with less anxiety and psychoactive high, delta-8 is the newest way to get into cannabis. Sound interesting? We can hook you up with the best Delta-8 THC deals so you can investigate for yourself what this new-fangled version of THC is really about!

What is an eating disorder

An eating disorder fits under psychiatric disorders which means first and foremost, there is no medical definition, as in, there is no formal proof that can be made. The definition according to psychiatry, is a disorder “in which the people experience severe disturbances in their eating behaviors and related thoughts and emotions. People with eating disorders typically become pre-occupied with food and their body weight.” This, of course, extends to both ends of the spectrum, those who are overeating for their body weight, and those who are undereating for their bodyweight.

As always with psychological disorders, as there is no medical definition or confirmation, these disorders are identified only through the diagnosis of a doctor, and are therefore subjective in their interpretation. It is also quite possible, because of a lack of a medical definition, that different professionals can levy entirely different diagnoses on the same patient. Having said that, all the examples listed below highlight basic eating disorder categories, each with its own individual symptoms.

According to the National Eating Disorders Association (NEDA), approximately 20 million women and 10 million men will develop an eating disorder at some point in life. The National Institute of Mental Health thinks its even higher, stating that approximately 25% of college students have an eating disorder. It should be remembered that binge eating is included here, and that these statistics come from subjective diagnoses.

Examples?

anorexia nervosa

1) Six of the more well-known eating disorders are as follows: The most well known is anorexia-nervosa. This eating disorder is characterized by a limitation in food intake, often to the point of extreme malnutrition and physical emaciation. Sufferers often have distorted body images whereby they see themselves as looking different (generally in a negative capacity) then how they actually look, with this discrepancy being focused on weight. Anorexia can affect men or women, but is more commonly seen in women.

2) Bulimia-nervosa is also very well known. It is characterized by a binge/purge pattern in which the sufferer will at times eat large amounts of food (exercising no control in the process), and then work to purge themselves of the food by vomiting, using laxatives, diuretics, enemas, or excessive exercise. While some publications (including the one referenced) name fasting as a method of purging, this would have to be an extreme fast that is intense enough to effect health (it isn’t uncommon to eat a lot at one point, and not get hungry – or choose not to eat – for a much longer than normal period of time.) Much like anorexia, this is more commonly experienced by women.

3) Binge eating is also very common, maybe the most common of all, although to the majority of people it is simply known as ‘overeating’. In binge eating cases, the sufferer will consume excessive calories, experience a lack of control while doing so, but unlike in bulimia cases, will not attempt to expel the excess calories. For this reason, this eating disorder is often associated with being overweight or even obese. In fact, the purging or not purging of the calories is what separates binge eating from bulimia, and in most other ways including the lack of control, large amounts of food and small consumption time, and overall feelings of guilt, embarrassment and shame, the two are about the same. Simply overeating here and there does not constitute entry into this category. Getting an actual diagnosis implies an existing pattern of extreme behavior.

4) The top three disorders are known to most, but here is where it gets a little weird. The next disorder on the list is pica. In pica cases, the individual is likely to be hungry for all kinds of things that aren’t exactly food. This can mean ice, soil, soap, hair, pebbles, detergent etc. As you might imagine with some of the inputs on this list, this can cause some severe issues if the wrong material is ingested, both in a person accidentally poisoning themselves, as well as considering all the infections and injuries that such non-foods can cause internally. Pica can be experienced by anyone, but is generally seen in children, the pregnant, and those with mental disabilities.

5) Next is rumination disorder, which also has a kind of strange definition that those of us in the regular eating world, were probably not aware of. A person with this disorder regurgitates food which has already been swallowed, and then re-chews the food, and swallows once again, or spits it out. This is, essentially, what animals that chew their own cud do, however this is obviously not a characteristic of basic humanity. The reflux occurs within about 30 minutes of a meal, and is completely voluntary, unlike with acid reflux. This disorder can affect men and women, of any age, and often resolves itself when seen in infants. It is a newly recognized disorder.

6) Avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder is generally seen in infants and children only, but can persist into adulthood. It involves a disturbance in eating which can be due to having no interest, or an issue related to the temperature, taste, texture, or smell of something. This is only identified in extreme cases and shouldn’t be confused with simply being picky. People with this disorder might even be diagnosed with other conditions like failure to thrive if they can no longer mature due to lack of nutrients. This disorder has nothing to do with food availability.

How could cannabis help?

cannabis for eating disorders

The first thing to consider when looking at cannabis for eating disorders is that – as previously mentioned – they are not medically defined. They are only defined through a grouping of symptoms which leads to a subjective diagnosis. Cannabis and eating disorders can be studied by observing changes in behaviors related to food when cannabis is consumed.

Cannabis has been used for quite some time to treat the anorexia associated with diseases like cancer and AIDS – called cachexia, where the inability to eat causes the person to waste away. Cannabis has been used in this way since it was reintroduced back into Western medicine more recently, with plenty of research being done which supports the use of cannabis in this way. Less research has been done on anorexia nervosa, which is voluntary, whereas cachexia is not.

However, there are some studies. Cannabis could be useful for helping with the underlying anxiety of some eating disorders, and by supporting a healthy appetite. This study from 2017 which investigated the effects of delta-9 THC on anorexia-nervosa symptoms found no overall increase in BMI, but it did show significant positive results in terms of self-reporting for body care, feelings of ineffectiveness, and general depression. The study authors concluded that delta-9 could be effective in the treatment of psychological symptoms associated with anorexia.

One study even found that using cannabis makes food smell and taste better to the eater, which could be a big draw for those attempting to keep themselves from food.

A systematic review from 2017 investigating the efficacy of cannabis for different psychological and neurodegenerative diseases, included two studies done on cannabis and anorexia. In one study with 11 female participants being given titrated amounts of THC, similar weight gain was shown to diazepam – aka valium. It should be noted that three patients in the THC group had to be withdrawn due to negative side effects, which begs the question of why doses were not individualized based on needs. However, they were not, so it is unclear if the issues experienced could have been alleviated with smaller doses. What is clear is that valium, as a benzodiazepine, is a highly addictive drug, and getting the same benefit from cannabis would mean a significantly safer alternative.

The second study in the review used dronabinol as the form of THC. Dronabinol is a pharmaceutical cannabis medication that does contain THC in it. The placebo-controlled study consisted of two four-week periods with a four-week clean-out period in between. The study presented evidence that dronabinol encouraged weight gain, as much as .73kg compared to the placebo group.

binge eating

Some speculate that issues like anorexia and bulimia are related to imbalances in the endocannabinoid system, for which cannabis can be useful in regulating. It is speculated that these disorders result from impairments in this system, with the hypothesis that cannabis, as an agent that effects the endocannabinoid system, could be used for positive benefit. As noted by Dr. John Krystal, editor of Biological Psychiatry which put out a report in 2011, “The role of endocannabinoids in appetite control is clearly important. These new data point to important connections between this system and eating disorders.” There is obviously much more to be investigated here.

Issues with cannabis for eating disorders

When it’s said that cannabis can be good for eating disorders, its important to specify which ones. Cannabis has been known to cause episodes of binge eating, so it wouldn’t be the likely answer for someone who is already having issues controlling their overeating. It also might be questionable for those suffering from things like pica – where it could encourage more unnecessary and dangerous eating, or bulimia where it could encourage even bigger binges.

The dose used is also very important to consider when it comes to cannabis for eating disorders. In one study, three participants were removed due to negative side effects with THC, but this was done rather than assessing personal limitations for THC consumption. Accounting for the fact that different people will handle things differently, and require different amounts of medication, is a generally important point in medicine. Not accounting for this is a massive detraction for any study using standardized doses, especially if the study authors did not consider this. However, having said that, it’s important to remember that high doses of THC can cause a cannabis overdose with negative side-effects, and this should always be considered when treating someone who already has mental issues.

Conclusion

New applications for cannabis are being discovered (and rediscovered) every day. Cannabis might not be best for all eating disorders, but it might be useful for those suffering from anorexia-nervosa. These days, everything is about body image and weight. The idea that cannabis might help anorexia sufferers to feel better about themselves, or even add on a few pounds, is incredibly useful, and highlights another great example for medical cannabis.

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Resources

Can You Treat COVID-19 With CBD and Reduce Mortality Rates? A New Israeli Research Believes You Can!
How Does CBD Treat Addiction?

Compared to Prescription Medication, Medical Cannabis Not Always Affordable Alternative
Can You Treat COVID-19 With CBD and Reduce Mortality Rates? A New Israeli Research Believes You Can!

America Is Cannabis Friendly – It’s Official New Vaping Bill: Effective March 2021 No More Mail Order Of CBD & Delta-8 THC Vape Carts
What is DELTA 8 THC (FAQ: Great resource to learn about DELTA 8THC)

Lebanon Legalized Medical Cannabis, 1st in Arab World
Mama Cultiva & the Fight for Cannabis Legalization
The CBD Flowers Weekly newsletter (your top resource for all things smokable hemp flowers)
The Medical Cannabis Weekly newsletter (International medical cannabis business report)
Cannabis Heroes of History: How Robert Randall Beat the U.S.

The Delta 8 Weekly Newsletter (All you need to know about Delta 8 thc) and the Best Black Friday Delta 8 THC Deals 2020.  The best delta-8 THC deals, coupons and discounts.
What Are The Qualifying Medical Conditions For Cannabis In Your State? Argentina Allows Cannabis Self-Cultivation
Why Using THC Is Good for the Eyes

The post Cannabis for Eating Disorders Like Anorexia appeared first on CBD Testers.

Cannabis Antibiotics: Answer to Disease-Resistant Bacteria

There’s been a lot of talk about how, and whether, cannabis can be used in place of antibiotics. Centuries of natural medicine traditions tell us ‘yes’ already, but now the Western medicine world is finally catching up. New research highlights how cannabis antibiotics are a likely and reasonable answer to the issue of disease-resistant bacteria.

If you haven’t tried delta-8 THC yet, then you’re using cannabis the old-fashioned way. Delta-8 provides a new way to use cannabis with less anxiety, and less psychoactive effects. This makes it the optimal form of THC for many people. Check it out to see for yourself. We’ve got all the best Delta-8 THC deals for you to get acquainted with this new form of cannabis medicine.


Let’s go back in time first

There are tons of natural medicine traditions that have existed on the planet through the history of man. Two of the more well-known, which are still in existence today, are Ayurvedic medicine out of India, and Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) out of China. In Ayurveda, medical cannabis was used since 1000 b.c., with one of the reasons being as an antibiotic. This included topical use for skin infections, as well as for ailments like tuberculosis. Imagine that, information was figured out 1000 years before Jesus was supposed to have walked the earth, and researchers of today are only now catching up? Perhaps we should look at history more often.

When it comes to Traditional Chinese Medicine and cannabis, there’s a striking lack of information published, and not because it doesn’t exist. While most sites cite the lack of translation to Western languages for the void in information, this explanation sounds suspect. This is a popular topic, it goes against logic to assume that no one has bothered to translate for the English speaking world.

cannabis antibiotics

My guess is that as the pre-eminent natural medicine tradition, it bodes better for Western medicine practitioners to keep this information out as it tends to threaten the pharmaceutical industry (highlighted by this very article and the use of a natural medicine to combat bacterial infections). It is understood that cannabis has been written on within the medical tradition for at least 1800 years, and that all parts of the plant were used. Some publications say that hemp has been cultivated in China for as many as 4000 years. Again, there seems to be a block in getting this information to the Western world. You can draw your own conclusions as to why.

Starting anywhere from 1000-4000 years ago, cannabis started being used in medical applications, which have been fully written about in detail throughout history. And one of those applications was using cannabis antibiotics. In today’s world of growing use and over-use of antibiotics, which has led to large and escalating problems with antibiotic resistance, it seems like paying a little more attention to what was gleaned from history, might be exactly what we need.

Western medicine finally catching up

It’s almost funny to think that we’ve technically had this information for thousands of years, and yet most people are wholly unaware, because they aren’t made aware, by the medical world. And instead of paying attention to history, the Western medicine world constantly tries to rewrite it, except that this most recent rewriting only goes to back up what natural medicine has been saying all this time: cannabis can be used in place of antibiotics.

How did Western medicine finally catch up? Through a study showing that CBD can kill gram-negative bacteria. Gram-negative bacteria are bacteria strains most relevant to antibiotic resistance. They are identified – and separated from gram-positive bacteria – by the composition of the inner cell membrane and the cell wall, which are pushed together between an inner membrane and an outer membrane.

The outer membrane is not seen in gram-positive bacteria, and it is this outer membrane that keeps antibiotics from penetrating. Another issue with gram-negative bacteria and antibiotics is that, even if the antibiotics penetrate the cell, the bacteria can expel these antibiotics through an internal pump system, making it that much harder to eradicate them. The two different types of bacteria can be told apart from each other using the Gram stain test. Gram-negative bacteria will not retain the color from the stain test.

What does antibiotic resistance mean?

biofilms

It means, quite literally, a resistance to the use of antibiotics. However, how it came to be this way, is less obvious. There are a couple issues in particular that led to this current crisis. One is the general overuse of antibiotics, which can be seen in the over-prescription of them when not really necessary, as well as the prescription for antibiotics when the culprit is not bacterial – sometimes for viral infections and other issues that do not require, nor benefit from, antibiotics. The other main issue is the implementation of antibiotics in our food supply. This pertains primarily to animal products, which has meant a massive intake of antibiotics in farm animals, This is generally associated with large corporations that run factory farms to raise animals, where the animals are kept in overcrowded and unsanitary conditions.

What this leads to is a change in the bacterium which allows it to resist the antibiotic, effectively making the antibiotic useless. When thinking of large-scale, deadly, and/or fast-spreading diseases, this creates a general inability to control it spreading, or to help those who have been infected. At least by Western medicine standards. This part is important, as measures have been taken for centuries – and today – that do not require antibiotics. Luckily now, with new research to back it up for those who don’t trust or know their history, it seems to be accepted, or nearly accepted, within the medical community that CBD can be used to kill bacteria, even when it is resistant to antibiotics.

The research

In January of 2021, a study was released that investigated the antimicrobial abilities of cannabidiol, or CBD.  CBD is known as the primary non-psychoactive cannabinoid of the cannabis plant, and as such has been accepted more in medicine than its psychoactive counterpart THC. In this study, CBD was tested with both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. Gram-positive bacteria are easier to treat as they don’t resist antibiotics as easily, and CBD was confirmed in the study to treat gram-positive bacteria.

When it comes to gram-negative bacteria, where significantly less research has been done, the study authors tested it against pathogens not tested with CBD before, like the following: Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Clostridioides difficile. The study authors concluded that cannabidiol has “excellent activity against biofilms, little propensity to induce resistance, and topical in vivo efficacy.”

How does CBD do it? It is thought that the main mode of action is through the disruption of the outer membrane, the part that separates gram-positive from gram-negative bacteria, and which allows for the resistance of bacteria. CBD can actually break through biofilms of this kind, allowing entrance into the cell. This study marks the first time that CBD has been used to kill gram-negative bacteria subsets in a study, including a pathogen considered to be an urgent threat – Neisseria gonorrhoeae, known to most simply as gonorrhea. All of this indicates that CBD, itself, could create a new class of cannabis antibiotics.

CBD medicine

What are biofilms, and why isn’t cannabis resistant to antibiotics?

A biofilm  is a “community of micro-organisms irreversibly attached to a surface and encased in an EPS (extracellular polymeric substance), with increased resistance to host cellular and chemical responses.” It can be thought of like a very strong form of plastic wrap that a cell has covering it, which doesn’t allow for the penetration of medications. It acts as a barrier between the microbe and the world around, allowing it to grow without interference. Biofilms can be within the body (where they are substantially harder to deal with without hurting the human body), or outside it on surfaces like medical equipment, pipes, aquatic systems, and many other places. The ability for the bacteria to live in these places and go undisturbed, allows for the spread of them, which can be especially damaging in medical settings.

The question of why CBD doesn’t become resistant becomes a bigger discussion point. Essentially, plant compounds are very complicated, more so than antibiotics, which are very simple. The more complicated, the harder for microbes to get a handle on them. Plants used for medicine have secondary metabolites which make them even more complicated, and introduce alkaloids, flavonoids, tannins, and terpenes, which add to the complexity, while often having their own antimicrobial properties.

If you’ll notice, I said ‘plants’, not ‘cannabis’, and that’s because cannabis is not even close to being the first plant to be established as capable of fighting biofilms. This can be seen in studies like this 2012 investigation into how a number of essential oils can influence biofilms of Staphylococcus aureus. The study found that the essential oils of cassia, red thyme and Peru balsam showed the best results for getting rid of Staphylococcus aureus biofilms, proving more effective than most antibiotics.

The study authors indicated that red thyme and cassia were not tested against MRSA biofilms at that point, but that the essential oils of tea tree, thyme, and peppermint had been, and had already shown to be effective against MRSA biofilms. Basically, the same thing being looked into now with cannabis, was already established with other plants at least eight years ago.

This study from 2019 – as another example – investigated these potentials in the essential oils of cinnamon, marjoram, and thyme, with cinnamon and thyme showing the best inhibitory results.

Conclusion

Watching Western medicine trying to catch up to Eastern medicine is kind of like watching paint dry, or grass grow. For those of us coming from the natural medicine standpoint, it’s a long, frustrating process, with a lot of mishaps, holdups, and misunderstandings. But luckily, things eventually get through, and now, thousands of years after it was established that cannabis antibiotics are effective, it looks like Western medicine is finally taking the bait.

Hello and welcome to CBDtesters.co, your #1 spot for all cannabis-related news and information. Join us regularly to keep up with the world of legal cannabis, and sign up to our newsletter so you’re always in the know!

Resources


It Was Just a Matter of Time: GMO Cannabis on Its Way

Compared to Prescription Medication, Medical Cannabis Not Always Affordable Alternative
A Brief History Of CBD The Week in Review: Canadian Cannabis, Antibiotic Resistance, Father’s Day Gift Ideas, and more
Can You Treat COVID-19 With CBD and Reduce Mortality Rates? A New Israeli Research Believes You Can!

Not Just for Getting High – The Underreported Medical Uses of THC
In a world plagued with antibiotic resistance, look to cannabis as a natural alternative
The CBD Flowers Weekly newsletter (your top resource for all things smokable hemp flowers)
The Medical Cannabis Weekly newsletter (International medical cannabis business report)
Cannabis Heroes of History: How Robert Randall Beat the U.S.

The Delta 8 Weekly Newsletter (All you need to know about Delta 8 thc) and the Best Black Friday Delta 8 THC Deals 2020.  The best delta-8 THC deals, coupons and discounts.
The Medical Cannabis Weekly Review: Antibiotic Resistance, Cannabis in Italy, CBD for Weight Loss, and more Argentina Allows Cannabis Self-Cultivation
CBG Study Shows Antimicrobial Properties of Cannabis

The post Cannabis Antibiotics: Answer to Disease-Resistant Bacteria appeared first on CBD Testers.

Can You Treat COVID-19 With CBD and Reduce Mortality Rates? A New Israeli Research Believes You Can!

Can you treat COVID-19 with CBD?
Can you reduce mortality rates of COVID-19 in patients with sever cases by using cannabinoids? A new Israeli clinical trial, approved recently, believes that a possible treatment for COVID-19 could be a blend of CBD and steroids.

Exciting news coming from Israel suggests that you can treat COVID-19 with CBD! According to this research, the possible treatment for COVID-19 patients might be coming from a special blend of CBD and Steroids. Unlike other cannabinoids-based medicine, aimed to treat but not to cure, the current clinical trial, held in the Rabin Medical Center (Beilinson) is using CBD and steroids to reduce mortality rates among the among COVID-19 patients in the worst states of health. If this clinical trial produces positive results, we might see a new wave of global attention toward CBD, cannabis and cannabinoid-based medicine.

Looking to learn more about cannabinoids-based medicine?
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Can You Treat COVID-19 With CBD?

A new clinical trial, by the Rabin Medical Center, (RMC), is testing a promising CBD (Cannabidiol) based treatment for patients with severe and critical COVID-19 pulmonary infection. The study, which runs in cooperation of Stero Biotechs, an Israel-based company focused on Cannabidiol (CBD) formulation research and Mor Research applications, the TTO arm of Clalit, the largest state-mandated health service organizations in Israel, is trying to establish whether a new formula, based on CBD (infused in pharma grade olive oil) and steroids can reduce COVID-19’s mortality rates.

The clinical trial already received Helsinki Committee approval and is planned for 20 patient treatment as a Proof of Concept (‘POC’), using Stero’s CBD-based treatment, conducted by Dr. Ilya Kagan from the intensive care department with the support of Dr. Moshe Yeshurun, Director of the Bone Marrow Transplantation Unit, at Rabin Medical Center, Israel.

Treat COVID-19 with CBD
Treat COVID-19 with CBD: A New Israeli Research In Rabin Medical Center

The study aims to benefit and help COVID-19 patients in severe states with respiratory failure from acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The treatment cycle will be for 14-28 days with a subsequent follow-up period of the same length. Pending the success of this POC, Stero plans to expand and scale phase 2a multi-center study, with an additional 40 patients, under FDA clinical trial guidelines and regulations.

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According to David Bassa, Founder & CEO of Stero Biotechs after six years of researching CBD they already gathered alot of data about CBD’s safety, its effectiveness in treating inflammation and its ability to moderate the ammune system when it is becoming over-active.

In addition, the company has already researched the efficacy of CBD for the treatment of acute (Grade 3-4) Graft versus Host Disease (“GvHD”), when combined with steroids. That’s why, after learning from Oxford that steroids are effective in treating COVID-19 they have decided to use their own experience research a blend that uses both CBD and steroids. They believe that a formula that uses both CBD and steroids will be more effective in treating patients in severe states and that by adding CBD they will be enhancing the therapeutic effect of a steroid treatment.

About Stero Biotechs, Ltd.

STERO  Biotechs Ltd., founded in 2017 and headquartered in Israel,  is a clinical-stage company committed to the research and development of novel Cannabidiol (CBD) based treatment solutions that will potentially benefit millions by:
1) Enhancing the therapeutic effect of steroid treatments.
2) Lowering the dosage needed in steroid treatments, thus lowering the treatment’s horrific side effects. 
3) Allowing refractory patients to begin responding to the steroid treatments needed. 

All by using Stero’s CBD-based treatment.

Stero has 2 ongoing phase 2a clinical trials in Crohn’s Disease & in Urticaria (Hives) in Israeli hospitals and is planning to commence more clinical trials in 2020-2021 on various indications.

Stero has established a strong partnership with one of its shareholders- MOR Research Applications, the TTO of CLALIT HEALTH SERVICES. The partnership with MOR allows deep support to Stero’s clinical trials.

About Clalit

CLALIT is the largest HMO in ISRAEL, with:

  • Over 4.5M members
  • 14  full-scale hospitals
  • Over 2000 community clinics
  • Over 9000 physicians.

RESOURCES:
The Endocannabinoid System Explained (Why Cannabis Is Good for Our Bodies)
Control of Inflammation with CBD
Everything You Need To Know About CBD Isolate (a deep look into hemp extracts)
Cannabinoids 101 – Spotlight on CBN (Cannabinol)
Everything You Need To Know About CBG Isolate
Your Complete Guide to EU GMP-Certified CBD Isolate and Distillate – Spotlight on the regulated EU market
Newest Cannabinoid Powerhouse – CBC – What Can It Do for You? What is DELTA 8 THC (FAQ: Great resource to learn about DELTA 8 THC)
Synthetic Cannabinoids (Are they safe?)
Cannabinoids 101 – Spotlight on CBN (Cannabinol)
DELTA 8 THC Medical Benefits (The medical background of using DELTA 8 THC products)
Everything You Need To Know About CBD Distillate
Get EU GMP-Certified Cannabinoid Isolates and Distillates
A Complete Guide To CBN Isolate (Cannabinol)
Best Delta-8 THC deals, coupons and discount. How to choose Delta-8 THC vape cartridges.

DELTA 8 THC Business: Risks and Rewards (Read it before opening a DELTA 8 THC business)
CBG Distillate Explained: What It Is, What It’s For, and How It’s Made
Delta-8 THC infused hemp flowers: How to choose Delta-8 THC flowers
The 
CBD Flowers Weekly newsletter (your top resource for all things smokable hemp flowers)
EU GMP Extracts: CBD Isolate, CBD Distillate and CBG Isolate

The post Can You Treat COVID-19 With CBD and Reduce Mortality Rates? A New Israeli Research Believes You Can! appeared first on CBD Testers.

Compared to Prescription Medication, Medical Cannabis Not Always Affordable Alternative

These days you’d be hard pressed to find someone who isn’t using some type of cannabis product, either recreationally, therapeutically, or both… but have you ever wondered how everyone is able to afford it?

Although many industries are struggling amid the ongoing pandemic, 2020 has been a record year for cannabis with prices and demand both at an all-time high. Everything from smokables to edibles, THC and CBD, dispensary and mail-order – everywhere you look there is a trending cannabis-based product.

What’s also holding firm, and increasing in many markets, is the prices for all the aforementioned items. In addition to cannabis being portrayed more favorably by the mainstream media, COVID-driven demand over the last year coupled with bottlenecks in supply has caused a surge in prices. And according to the U.S. Cannabis Spot Index Report, the average wholesale price per pound has reached its highest point in three years.

So, again that begs the question, how does it seem that everyone can afford these products so easily; considering high quality comes with an equally high price tag, and these products aren’t covered by insurance. We know they’re effective and safe, but are cannabis products an affordable alternative to prescription medication?

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Benefits of medical cannabis

I believe this is an important staring point, because it’s the therapeutic aspect of cannabis that’s really behind this burgeoning demand. It’s used recreationally for decades, but it wasn’t until word got out about the safety profile and medical benefits that cannabis products really saw a surge in popularity.

In the United States, the most common use for medical cannabis is pain management. Although it isn’t really strong enough for very severe pain, post-surgical for example, it’s highly effective in controlling various forms of chronic pain that effects millions of Americans. Cannabis is frequently endorsed as a safer alternative to opiate medication, which are dangerously addictive and responsible for an alarming number of overdose deaths in the states.

Cannabis can also replace over-the-counter (OTC) pain medication like Tylenol, Aspirin, Advil, and Ibuprofen, all of which are known to cause long-term damage to the kidneys and liver, and can lead to chronic health conditions including GERD, high blood pressure, and ulcers. In this vein, cannabis is also used to ease nerve pain, such as the pain associated with multiple sclerosis (MS) and lupus.  

Medicinal cannabis is also said to be a fantastic muscle relaxant, and it’s frequently used to lessen tremors in patients with Parkinson’s disease. Likewise, it can be used to relieve symptoms of Restless Leg Syndrome, as this disorder sometimes responds to medications that are used to treat Parkinson’s as well. There are many reports of it being used successfully for fibromyalgia, endometriosis, interstitial cystitis, and most other conditions where the final common pathway is chronic pain.

Another very common use for medical cannabis is to manage nausea and weight loss. Studies show tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the most abundant cannabinoid in the plant, can help treat glaucoma by successfully reducing intraocular pressure. Cannabidiol (CBD), the second most prominent cannabinoid is used for a growing number of ailments including inflammation and epilepsy. The only FDA-approved, cannabis-based medication is an oral solution comprised mostly of CBD.

Another very promising area of cannabis research is in the field of mental health. Numbers from the National Alliance on Mental Illness show that 1 in 5 Americans struggle with mental illness, and further research indications that the COVID-pandemic has mental health on the decline. So far, anecdotal evidence shows that cannabis is great for treating depression, curbing addictions to other substances, and alleviating anxiety. Many veterans and their therapists report drastic improvement for those dealing with PTSD and are pushing for legalization and more studies.

The Endocannabinoid System

To understand why cannabinoids are so effective and capable of targeting such a varied range of conditions, you will need to have a better understanding of the Endocannabinoid System (ECS). The ECS is a network of receptors that can be found throughout the bodies of all mammals. We naturally create cannabinoids in our bodies – called endocannabinoids – which bond to these receptors to regulate different processes in our bodies and maintain internal balance and harmony.

So far, researchers have been able to identify two separate endocannabinoids: 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) and anandamide (AEA), as well as two main receptors: CB1 and CB2. 2-AG is a full agonist of both the CB1 and CB2 receptors but it has a more direct association with the CB2 receptor. Because of this, 2-AG is thought to have a substantial influence over the immune system.

Anandamide – or AEA – also casually known as the “bliss molecule”, has a major impact on our state of homeostasis. AEA can help manage things such as appetite, sleep wake cycles, pain response, and then some. Our bodies continuously cycle through anandamide. It breaks down very easily, so it doesn’t stay in the body for long. However, our bodies create it on-demand to maintain homeostasis.

There is a condition referred to as ‘cannabinoid deficiency’, characterized by a body’s inability to produce endocannabinoids. Some experts theorize that many illnesses we suffer from, stem from this shortage of endocannabinoids.

High price tags from coast to coast 

A recent survey conducted by the state of Ohio found that roughly 60% of patients and caregivers are frustrated with the prices of medical cannabis products at their local dispensaries. The poll discovered that, on average, people were paying around $300 monthly for cannabis, all out of pocket.

“Why are these products so expensive? Does Ohio realize that those prescribed mmj (medical marijuana) often deal with symptoms that make working full-time difficult?” questioned one of the survey respondents.

And this issue is certainly not limited to Ohio. Across the country, cannabis prices are teetering bordering on the edge completely unreasonable and downright unaffordable. In states like Michigan, Illinois, and California, the average cost of a high-quality ounce of medicinal bud is between $255 and $380, and people using weed medicinally typically smoke one to two (sometimes more) ounces per month. You can do the math on that one, it’s not cheap.

In Pennsylvania, the situation is no different. A recent article from The Philadelphia Inquirer pegs the state as one of the nation’s most expensive medical cannabis markets. Everything from profiteering to supply issues has been named as a cause of this issue but the truth is, the state’s industry seems a lot like California’s with a lack of oversight on pricing. State officials from the PA medical marijuana advisory board say that patients are frequently complaining about the ridiculous costs.

Wholesale costs aren’t much better. On average, a decent, mid-shelf outdoor pound will run you $1,327/lb to $1,470/lb. Top of the line indoor flower is selling for between $3,215 and $3,552. The prices were observed nationwide in the following states: California, Colorado, Oregon, Massachusetts, Ohio, and Pennsylvania.

“Outraged about the prices”

Again, we know that cannabis works as medicine. Some of the many reason are listed above. We also know that it’s much safer than the pharmaceutical counterparts. However, until it’s covered by insurance plans or the prices go down significantly, many patients who need it will simply not be able to afford it.  

Spending hundreds of dollars a month on medical cannabis is outside the realm of possibility for many people who can just turn to their prescription insurance plan and get medication for very little money out of pocket. It circles back around to this concept that only people with money deserve to consume things that are natural and healthy, when people in low income living situations have equal to and sometimes higher rates of disease, chronic pain, and mental illness.

“The patient community is always outraged about the prices,” said Luke Shultz, an Ohio-state marijuana advisory board member. “I’m not sure where the price should be. But we’d sure like to see it lower.”

Federal prohibition making matters complicated  

It could be argued that the reason medical cannabis is a “flawed concept” is because it’s still federally illegal. It’s nearly impossible to have a low-cost “medication” when the main ingredient in that medication is a Schedule 1 narcotic that can’t legally be studied in the United States. Since it’s technically illegal, it won’t be covered by any insurance plans, it’s not administered in hospitals (like it is in other countries such as Israel), and it can’t be purchased over-the-counter in pharmacies like CVS or Walgreens.

Doctors can give “recommendations” for medical cannabis, but that’s not the same as a prescription that can be turned in at any local pharmacy. Also, because of its current legal status, most doctors are weary to even recommend it or have open discussions on the subject at all, leaving patients confused about what the benefits could be and stuck in the pharmaceutical cycle.

Final thoughts

Back when cannabis first became legal (recreationally) in California, the prices plummeted. It was easy to find a top-shelf ounce for around $60. Those prices have more than doubled in the last few years and all we can hope for is that the costs level out and start to drop over the coming months as local supplies begin to stabilize.

Thanks for joining us at CBDtesters.co, your prime location for all cannabis-related news. Come by frequently to stay in-the-loop, and sign up to our newsletter so you’re always in the know!

Resources:

It’s Not Your Parents’ THC – Welcome Cannabidiolic Acid Methyl Ester
Canadian Hemp Acreage and Export Value Up More Than 20%

Cannabis Prices in the United States
India’s Bhang Loophole, and the Question of Legalization
Interview with Raphael Mechoulam: The Father of Cannabis Research

Canadian Study Says Cannabis Worse Than Alcohol Best Deal Of The Year – $9.99 Delta 8 THC Vape Cartridges
Cannabis Taxing and Prices Across the Globe
What is DELTA 8 THC (FAQ: Great resource to learn about DELTA 8THC)

Time to Vote: Will WHO Cannabis Recommendations Be Accepted?
Prestigious Harvey Prize, a Predictor of the Nobel Prize Goes to Raphael Mechoulam
The CBD Flowers Weekly newsletter (your top resource for all things smokable hemp flowers)
The Medical Cannabis Weekly newsletter (International medical cannabis business report)
Lebanon Legalized Medical Cannabis, 1st in Arab World

The Delta 8 Weekly Newsletter (All you need to know about Delta 8 thc) and the Best Black Friday Delta 8 THC Deals 2020Cannabis Election Results –Why Israel Is (and will continue to be) A Global Leader in the Cannabis Industry Best hemp flower deals
Current CBD Deals And Exclusive Offers
Israeli Researchers Work on CBD-Based Treatment for COVID-19

Customize Your Cannabinoids – Now You Can Mix’ N’ Match
Cannabis Falling from the Sky in Israel Best Delta-8 THC Deals, Coupons and Discounts.
Cannabis Remains Schedule I After UN Vote
EU Beat France, CBD Legal Throughout EU

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