Higher Profile: Ed & Jane Rosenthal, Quick Trading Publishing

Ed Rosenthal is an icon—an OG in the cannabis space with more than a dozen educational books on growing the plant in print. He’s known as an authority on the subject, teaching long-running classes at prestigious Oaksterdam University in Oakland, California, where he makes his home with his wife and partner of more than 30 years, Jane Klein.

As one of the founders of High Times Magazine in New York City in 1974, Ed was dubbed the Guru of Ganja, writing his “Ask Ed” column for more than 20 years—long before online community forums or social media were places to gather and share information.

“Tom Forcade, Ron Lichty, and myself developed the concept for the magazine,” Ed shared. “I’d been doing statistical analysis based on a paper by Peter Knocke comparing the number of imported rolling papers over five to six years. The implication was that any increase in imports was generated by increased cannabis use. We looked at other factors as well to guesstimate the number of people using cannabis, including how many joints a day someone would smoke. Our conclusion was that the number of cannabis was vastly underestimated and a large enough community to support a monthly magazine.”

This scientific approach to the early stages of launching a national magazine entirely about weed was encouraging to the team, who were already fringe journalists and cannabis rights activists in the 1970s and had run the Underground Press Syndicate for many years.

“We mapped out 100 stories we thought we could publish, including my column,” Ed added. “Those stories became the first two years of the magazine. We didn’t have any ads at first, so we used national mainstream ads without permission, and that brought in a lot of advertisers to follow.”

As a journalist, Ed was embedded in the underground, reporting on grows that were considered illegal activities at the time. His “Ask Ed” column became the go-to for growers large and small at a time when doing so could land you in Federal prison. Ed knew that though the plant was illegal, people would grow it anyway; showing how to grow it better was a much needed service.

When asked about the decades worth of misinformation about cannabis as a medicinal plant, Ed responded vehemently, “It’s not misinformation, they lied to us to achieve the goal of discriminating against minorities and cannabis users! Even more shameful was the fact that the government knew about the medicinal benefits of CBD and other cannabinoids, patenting them while lying to the public.”

This year marks the 50th anniversary of the Shafer Commission’s report, published in 1972, calling for the decriminalization of cannabis, as it was about to be put on the Department of Health’s Schedule 1. Authored by then former Pennsylvania Governor Raymond P. Shafer, the report was ignored by the administration under Pres. Richard Nixon—who appointed Governor Shafer to the task, then proceeded to keep cannabis on the list of dangerous drugs with no medicinal value.

For those of us like Ed, who have been penning articles and columns to the contrary for years, positive changes have been slow in coming, but we persist.

Courtesy of Ed Rosenthal

Deputized, then Raided

In 2002, Ed was raided at his nursery where he grew plants for patients that got distributed through medical dispensaries in the San Francisco Bay area. The subsequent court case was one of the most high-profile at the time, as Ed had been Deputized prior to the raid by the City of Oakland as an officer, able to distribute legal medical cannabis under California’s Proposition 215, as voted on in 1996.

The Federally selected jury, however, was not privy to this State recognition, and Ed was convicted in 2003 with all charges overturned by the Federal Appeals Court in 2006. This was due to a cannabis-sympathetic juror questioning the trial to a lawyer friend, who provided misinformation about juror responsibilities. But, Ed had a firm belief that he’d never do time for the plant. 

“The judge lost friends over my trial—he and his wife were socialites in San Francisco, but they stopped being invited to parties. Everyone was against convicting me for this plant,” he said. “I was an educator and an activist—I did everything with the plant but sell it. For me, the trial was just another way to help change the public opinion of the law.

Unlike many who’ve been raided, persecuted, and judged for working with the plant, Ed went back to life as usual, publishing, educating, and advocating for the right to grow and use cannabis.

Nuptials, Lilies, and Weed

Through all the trials and tribulations, one little-known aspect of Ed’s life is the one he’s shared with his longtime partner and wife of 33 years, Jane Klein.

Ed was born and raised in the Bronx, New York, and Jane grew up in Hempsted, Long Island—but the two might as well have been from two different worlds.

They met through mutual friends, but Jane said he was too much of a hippie for her at the time.

In actuality, Ed’s past life included working as an Assistant Compliance Officer for a stock brokerage company. The year was 1967, and a co-worker brought Jane over to visit; but it wasn’t until the 1980s, after Jane and Ed had both put down roots in California that they became close.

One rumor within the cannabis community is that Jane also grew cannabis when they met, but the truth is, Jane grows other kinds of flowers, and they both grow vegetables together in their at-home hydroponics garden.

“I love to grow lilies, and Ed has a hydro bumper crop of tomatoes growing now,” Jane said. “Ed made onion soup the other night from scallions, zucchini, and peppers from the garden.”

Jane has been indispensable as CEO of their Quick Trading Publishing company, publishing most of Ed’s and other writer’s books for more than 25 years. 

“We don’t just regurgitate his old columns or how-to books,” she said. “Each book is updated to the times, as lighting and growing practices are always changing.”

His current effort, The Cannabis Grower’s Handbook, with Dr. Robert Flannery and Angela Bacca, includes a preface by Steve DeAngelo, a forward by none other than Tommy Chong, and an introduction by Angela Bacca. It’s an epic, updated compilation of just about everything you’d like to know about growing cannabis, and then some.

Ed has collaborated with many talented writers over the years in the space, including Angela Bacca, Ellen Holland, and David Downs.

As for their longevity in the space, both Ed and Jane agree the plant has something to do with that, as well.

“We are very fortunate to be in our 70s and aren’t taking any pharmaceutical medications,” Jane concluded. “Cannabis has taken the steam off tension, anxiety, stress—which can all cause illness, disorders, and psychological damage.”

In classic Ed form, he chided, “Besides my relationship with Jane, cannabis is the longest running relationship I’ve had with a woman in my entire life.” As he said this, Jane chuckled beside him.

Rosenthal
Courtesy of Ed Rosenthal

Backyard Weed for All

Ed’s accomplishments over the years as an activist are too numerous to name, and he has no intention of stopping yet. Recently on stage during the International Cannabis Business Conference (ICBC) in Barcelona, Spain, he quipped to an amused audience, “Everything they told us about weed is wrong. They said weed would lead to hard drugs, but we all know weed leads to hash.”

“Ed has just launched a lifetime dream towards fulfilling the goal of helping people to grow free backyard weed for all,” Jane shared. “Legalization in the U.S. is almost the law of the land now, and we are focusing on the POWs—the Prisoners of Weed.”

Ed’s Prisoners of Weed book pack includes two of his books, Cannabis Grower’s Handbook and Ask Ed: Marijuana Success, and a pack of seeds—genetics approved by Ed. Ten percent of proceeds go to the Last Prisoner Project, supporting the release and financial help to POWs.

“This is a real win-win-win,” Ed surmised. “I didn’t have to do time after I was raided, and I looked at it as just another form of activism. But, there are still people out there doing time for a plant many are profiting on now, and that’s wrong. We need to change that yesterday.”

For more information on Ed visit edrosenthal.com 

For more information on The Last Prisoner Project visit, lastprisonerproject.org

Follow Ed on Facebook
Instagram @edrosenthal420
Twitter @edrosenthal 

The post Higher Profile: Ed & Jane Rosenthal, Quick Trading Publishing appeared first on High Times.

AAPI Appreciation in the World of Weed: Movers and Shakers

Race is a topic that comes up a lot in cannabis, as social equity and the War on Drugs is discussed, but APPI folks are often left out of the conversation completely. Due to the harmful and racist “model minority” myth that Asians have to be model citizens, it is often assumed that they won’t have anything to do with even the world of legal cannabis—a myth that also shows there is still a major stigma against weed. To dispel those antiquated notions, we spoke with some of the major movers and shakers in cannabis who come from an AAPI background and are proudly bringing their cultural heritage to the world of cannabis. 

Photo courtesy of Fusion-Studio

Clark Wu – Attorney, Bianchi & Brandt 

Clark Wu is an attorney with Bianchi & Brandt and appreciates that the team he is on, specializing in cannabis law, has a variety of different backgrounds and strives to increase overall diversity in the cannabis industry through their practices. His work with the firm includes assisting groups that secured social equity licenses in Arizona and providing them with the tools they need to succeed.

“I give back outside of work through the American Bar Association’s judicial internship program by mentoring law students to encourage a more diverse generation of lawyers,” he says. “I’m also a part of the International Cannabis Bar Association’s Diversity Committee, which seeks to promote diversity and inclusion in the industry while reducing barriers to entry by developing tools to help social equity groups succeed. My firm has not only supported but encouraged these efforts.” 

AAPI
Photo courtesy of Angela Cheng

Angela Cheng –  SVP of Marketing and Communications at Pacific Stone  

Angela Cheng was born in Hong Kong and grew up in Vancouver in a progressive household with artist parents. She feels that the immigrant experience and growing up creative helped inform her choice to work in cannabis marketing and help brands tap into their creative energy. 

“I would love to see more people who look like me working in cannabis. Representation is important, and as the cannabis industry continues to evolve it’s important to not just show up but to actively participate in the conversation,” she says. “My parents are now very proud of my work but it took time, and I think part of the reason it took time was because there were very few platforms for AAPIs in cannabis.” 

AAPI
Courtesy of Socrates Rosenfeld

Socrates Rosenfeld, Co-Founder and CEO of Jane Technologies, Inc.

As the CEO and Co-Founder of Jane, a cannabis e-commerce provider, Rosenfeld initially got some pushback from his mom when he entered the cannabis space. As an Indonesian man, his mom had a lot of preconceived notions about cannabis but eventually, Rosenfeld was able to educate her about the good it can do. 

“My mom came around once she realized our ultimate mission is to help people, and that Jane was founded on my own healing experience with the plant,” he says. “As Asian-Americans, cannabis is a part of our history. It’s up to the current generation to redefine what the plant represents for ourselves—as well as for previous and future generations.”

AAPI
Courtesy of Anne Fleshman

Anne Fleshman, VP of Marketing at Flowhub

As an active member of the cannabis industry for almost four years now with Flowhub, a cannabis point of sale company, Fleshman compares her cannabis journey to “coming out.” Cannabis was never something she spoke about openly before, and it took her a while to get over her stigma. 

“For a long time, I felt guilty about my personal consumption of cannabis,” says Fleshman, “There is still a stigma for sure, but I believe it’s diminishing. It’s refreshing to see communities normalizing cannabis as medicine and more states legalizing adult-use sales. As the industry matures, we have a unique opportunity to create a diverse and inclusive workforce that reverses the damages of the War on Drugs. We must create clear pathways to mentorship and educational opportunities, and prioritize the experiences of people of color and women in industry leadership roles.”

AAPI
Courtesy of Marion Mariathasan

Marion Mariathasan, CEO and Co-founder of Simplifya

As CEO of compliance software company Simplifya, Marion Mariathasan has founded numerous cannabis startups and is no stranger to the industry. 

“It is nothing like how it was back when I first got into the industry in 2015,” he says of the stigma he faced. “When I first told my family and friends about my interest in the cannabis space and that I was starting a RegTech company, they were super shocked. Much of the shock I believe had to do with the fact that cannabis was still federally illegal, and due to the negative perception they had of cannabis—primarily due to misinformation.” 

AAPI
Courtesy of Vince Ning. Jun S. Lee (left) and Vince C. Ning (right) (Co-Founders & Co-CEOs) 

Vince Ning – Nabis 

Vince is Co-CEO and Co-Founder of Nabis, the licensed cannabis wholesale platform. Vince’s prowess in technology, finance, and data analysis have helped him partner with cannabis brands across the state of California, where he has helped hundreds of businesses launch and scale. In doing so, he is always conscious of both his marginalization as an Asian person as well as his privilege. 

“It was definitely something that was on our mind,” he says when discussing being Asian in the industry. “We knew we’d be put in that category, and we really tried to first learn more about the existing cannabis culture. We didn’t want to come in and just be these Asian techies coming into the cannabis industry, trying to just do things our way. We really wanted to learn about how the industry got here and really integrate ourselves into existing fabric and try to help it and help shape it rather than forcing anything.”

Photo by Ellen Jaskol. ellenjaskol@gmail.com.

Sonya Lo, Executive Board Member, urban-gro

As the only female AAPI CEO of two major indoor growing ventures under urban-gro, Sonya Lo would like to see more representation in leadership positions, because she knows it is there in the grow room. Many of the world’s poorest farmers are women of color, and she believes that for them, seeing that representation is critical. 

“Sustainability isn’t just about carbon reduction, but also about creating better opportunities for farmers who wouldn’t otherwise have access to technology opportunities such as the ones I’ve had,” she says. “Over the next 10 years, I hope the indoor growing industry will reflect the increased diversity of industrialized nations’ populations and the adoption of these technologies in countries where women of color are the farmers.”

The post AAPI Appreciation in the World of Weed: Movers and Shakers appeared first on High Times.

Joan Jett Deflects Ted Nugent Criticism, Cites 1977 High Times Interview

Joan Jett stated her case in a new interview with NME—citing a wild conversation Ted Nugent had with High Times in 1977.

Rolling Stone included Jett as #87 in their list of the 100 Greatest Guitarists of all time, which was originally published in 2003. Last December, Nugent—who didn’t make the list—slammed the decision to include Jett in the list.

“You have to have shit for brains and you have to be a soulless, soulless prick to put Joan Jett [on the list],” Nugent said during a livestream on his YouTube account on December 30, 2021.

Jett fired back months later, defending her status as one of the greatest guitarists, and explaining that Nugent’s attack was a poor choice of words based on past interviews.

“Is that his implication,” Jett asked NME, “that he should be on the list instead of me? Well, that’s just typical—it’s what I’ve dealt with my whole life, being written off. Ted Nugent has to live with being Ted Nugent. He has to be in that body, so that’s punishment enough.”

“He’s not a tough guy,” she continued. “He plays tough guy, but this is the guy who shit his pants—literally—so he didn’t have to go in the Army.”

The 1977 Ted Nugent x High Times Interview

Jett was alluding to Nugent’s infamous 1977 interview, first published in High Times, but frequently cited. In 1977, Nugent was at the peak of his fame with his biggest hit “Cat Scratch Fever.” 

When High Times writer Glenn O’Brien interviewed young Ted Nugent in 1977—like many other old-school High Times articles—the interview went off the rails at times. Nugent said he avoided being drafted into the Vietnam War in 1967 by dropping his own personal hygiene and dabbling in drugs to appear like a hobo. 

“I got my physical notice 30 days prior to [being drafted],” Nugent told High Times. “Well, on that day I ceased cleansing my body. No more brushing my teeth, no more washing my hair, no baths, no soap, no water. Thirty days of debris build. I stopped shavin,’ and I was 18, had a little scraggly beard, really looked like a hippie. I had long hair, and it started gettin’ kinky, matted up.”

Nugent continued, “Then two weeks before, I stopped eating any food with nutritional value. I just had chips, Pepsi, beer—stuff I never touched—buttered poop, little jars of Polish sausages, and I’d drink the syrup, I was this side of death. Then a week before, I stopped going to the bathroom. I did it in my pants. Poop, piss the whole shot. My pants got crusted up.”

Nugent also explained that he was typically “extremely anti-drug” but “I snorted some crystal methedrine” in order to avoid the draft, which is ironic considering his long-held stance on drugs. 

Nugent is indeed still anti-drug nowadays, and said as recently as 2018 that he’s “hardcore” against pot. “I have stepped over so many dead bodies who tried to convince me that smoking dope was a victimless crime,” Nugent said in an interview on WKAR’s “Off The Record.”

What Really Happened

So where did the story about getting out of Vietnam come from in the first place? According to an updated autobiography, Kenny Mills, a drummer who goes by the stage name of KJ Knight, claims that it was he—not Nugent—who “used wild antics” at the Selective Service physical and was quickly dismissed from serving. Knight was a prolific drummer in bands like The Knightriders and The Amboy Dukes with Nugent.

According to military records, and reported by Fact Checker and the Reno Gazette Journal, Nugent got a student deferment, which is not “draft dodging” given that he showed up for the medical exam. 

Nugent later admitted that some of the story was made up in later interviews. Nugent got a high school student deferment (1-S) in 1967, a college student deferment (2-S) in 1968, and after being reclassified for military service (1-A) in 1969, Nugent was rejected as a result of a physical examination (1-Y) in 1969 and reportedly received a 4-F classification.

Student deferments are a legal means of avoiding service in the military—you know, the same method that Dick Cheney, Mitt Romney, Donald Trump, Bill O’Reilly, and Bill Clinton used to get out of the Vietnam War. Clinton also got help from friends in high places and didn’t follow through on some promises to avoid service but is legally considered not to have violated the Military Selective Service Act.

In any case, Nugent’s criticism of Jett was probably done without remembering his infamous High Times interview decades ago.

The post Joan Jett Deflects Ted Nugent Criticism, Cites 1977 High Times Interview appeared first on High Times.

Una Charla con Nancy Mace, la Legisladora Conservadora Detrás del Mayor Proyecto de Legalización de Cannabis en EEUU

Nota por Javier Hasse publicada originalmente en El Planteo. Más artículos por El Planteo en High Times en Español.

Síguenos en Instagram (@El.Planteo) y Twitter (@ElPlanteo).

Nancy Mace se muestra sorprendentemente cool y relajada. Habla de su vida, habla del cannabis, habla de su propia historia. Y advertencia: es bastante dura.

Mace es una política conservadora educada en la escuela militar y representante republicana de la Cámara de Representantes de Carolina del Sur. Y, entre otros menesteres, está detrás del proyecto de legalización del cannabis más completo de Estados Unidos: la Ley de Reforma de los Estados.

El proyecto de ley de Mace tiene partidarios que van desde Amazon (NASDAQ: AMZN) hasta Americans for Prosperity, de Charles Koch, y muchos otros.

Contenido relacionado: Legalización de la Marihuana en EEUU: Biden Sigue Sin Avanzar

‘El cannabis me ayudó en momentos difíciles’

“Dejé la escuela justo cuando cumplí 17 años. Me había violado un compañero de clase“, revela.

“Cuando pasé por esta experiencia, una de las cosas más duras por las que he pasado en mi vida, mi médico me recetó antidepresivos porque fue un acontecimiento traumático; física, emocional y mentalmente, un acontecimiento horrible en mi vida”.

Mace recuerda que los medicamentos recetados agravaron su depresión. “Tenía que dejarlos o me iba a suicidar”.

Fue entonces cuando empezó a experimentar con el cannabis. Durante un breve periodo de tiempo, encontró consuelo en la planta; le ayudó a mantener a raya su ansiedad y a dormir mejor por la noche. “Realmente me ayudó a superar algunos momentos difíciles”.

Tus experiencias moldean tus opiniones

Han pasado casi tres décadas desde aquella experiencia que cambió su vida. Ahora que ha tenido tiempo de procesarla y de construir sobre ella, Mace reconoce el impacto que el episodio ha tenido en sus puntos de vista y opiniones.

Contenido relacionado: Cómo la Marihuana Puede Ayudar a Víctimas de Trauma Sexual

“Sin esa experiencia, no estaría aquí hoy”, dice. Luego, recordó sus días como camarera en la Waffle House después de abandonar la escuela secundaria y su regreso a la escuela. Además, fue la primera mujer en graduarse de The Citadel, en 1999.

“El cannabis fue lo que me ayudó a superar estas duras experiencias”, continúa. “Así que cuando hablo con veteranxs, con personas que tienen TEPT u otros problemas de salud, lo entiendo porque yo misma lo he vivido personalmente. Lo entiendo y puedo conectar con la gente que está luchando, y entender por qué hay un apoyo tan fuerte a la reforma del cannabis en los Estados Unidos”.

A través de las fronteras políticas

Es sorprendente pensar que Nancy Mace, una republicana de Carolina del Sur con afiliaciones militares, sea la mujer detrás de un proyecto de ley de legalización del cannabis tan importante. En la conciencia colectiva de los Estados Unidos, la marihuana es cosa de hippies y liberales de izquierda, ciertamente no celebrada (y en el mejor de los casos, tolerada) dentro de los círculos tradicionales de las Fuerzas Armadas. Sin embargo, Mace desafía estas nociones.

“Cuando hablas con nuestrxs soldados que regresan de la guerra, ves que la tasa de suicidios en nuestro país [está fuera de control], la tasa de adicción a drogas duras como los opioides… Estos han tenido un efecto tremendamente perjudicial para nuestras fuerzas armadas, nuestrxs soldados y veteranos”, subraya la representante.

Por eso, al elaborar la Ley de Reforma de los Estados, Mace añadió cláusulas de protección para veteranxs, así como para médicxs que trabajan en Asuntos Veteranos (VA) y que desean utilizar o recetar cannabis como medicamento. Esto significa que estas personas ya no se enfrentarían al riesgo de ser discriminadas por sus opciones de salud.

Contenido relacionado: Republicanos y Demócratas Están de Acuerdo: Quieren que la ONU Desclasifique el Cannabis

“Los asuntos de lxs veteranos son realmente cercanos a mi corazón, así que quería asegurarme de que, cuando estaba elaborando este proyecto de ley, incluí esas protecciones… Cuando vuelven a casa de la guerra, tienen mucho que reconciliar emocional y físicamente, y el cannabis puede ser un sanador, puede ser un salvavidas, para muchos de esos hombres y mujeres de uniforme”.

De hecho, señala Mace, la legalización del cannabis es una de las mejores herramientas de Estados Unidos para luchar contra la furiosa epidemia de opioides que asola el país.

Cuando tienes sólo un dispensario en tu estado, la tasa de adicción a los opioides y la tasa de muerte por adicción a los opioides, se reducen en casi un 20%. Así que imagina cuántas vidas podrías salvar si incluyes estas reformas en tu estado. Es una locura descubrir los beneficios que podemos tener cuando se hace una reforma del cannabis sólida, segura y responsable”, asegura.

Todo el mundo está apoyando este proyecto de ley

No son sólo lxs militares quienes se resisten a la legalización del cannabis. Las grandes farmacéuticas pueden sufrir grandes pérdidas con la legalización si no forman parte de la industria. Lo mismo puede decirse del alcohol y el tabaco.

Entonces, ¿cómo trata Mace a estos grandes grupos de presión de la industria? ¿Es evidente su presión?

“Algunos están a favor y otros en contra de la ley. Los grupos de presión pueden ser muy poderosos… Pero lo que veo es que hay un grupo de presión del cannabis que está creciendo, hay gente que ha invertido mucho y que va a invertir dinero en este asunto, tratando de hacer lo que pueda para abogar, para educar a los miembros del Congreso para que se haga”, dijo. “Y, en algunos casos, ya sea el lobby del alcohol o el de las farmacéuticas, algunas de esas personas van a querer entrar en el juego, cuando vean que las mareas cambian”.

Contenido relacionado: Un Vistazo a las Grandes Empresas que Quieren Meterse en la Industria del Cannabis

En realidad, varios de estos grandes actores ya han apoyado el proyecto de legalización de Mace. Como se mencionó anteriormente, tanto Amazon como Americans for Prosperity de Charles Koch han respaldado la iniciativa.

Los grupos progresistas de activismo cannábico, como la Organización Nacional para la Reforma de las Leyes sobre la Marihuana (NORML), también se han unido al proyecto de Mace.

“Tenemos grandes empresas como Amazon. No quieren venderla, pero afecta a cerca del 10% de la mano de obra de Estados Unidos, lo que supone unas 100.000 personas que no pueden contratar para un nuevo trabajo, aunque estén debidamente calificadas. Y por eso, se está viendo que los grupos de veteranxs apoyan el proyecto de ley, los grupos de aplicación de la ley apoyan el proyecto de ley… Todo el mundo está apoyando el proyecto de ley, excepto la gente que simplemente es ignorante en el tema“.

¿Qué hay que hacer?

“Para hacer una reforma del cannabis de forma responsable en este país, hay que tener a lxs republicanos a bordo. Aquí es donde la Ley de Reforma de los Estados viene a decir, ‘hey, este es el marco para hacerlo: de una manera bipartidista’…. Este año vamos a contar con un número igual de republicanxs y demócratas, así que es emocionante poder liderar ese esfuerzo. Le he robado el esfuerzo a lxs demócratas y ahora están viendo toda esta presión. Están sintiendo la presión porque hicieron campaña sobre esto en 2020 y no hicieron nada al respecto”.

Si este tema fue “robado” a lxs demócratas, le pregunto a Mace, ¿cómo se une el espectro político para ponerse detrás de este proyecto de ley?

Contenido relacionado: Encuesta EEUU: 58% Votaría a un Candidato que Fuma Marihuana Cada Tanto

“Bueno, lo estamos haciendo ahora mismo. Tenemos demócratas que quieren alinearse y copatrocinarlo. Pero quieren aprobar primero la Ley MORE, siendo respetuosos con los plazos y, en política en Estados Unidos, es como ver cómo se fabrica una salchicha”, respondió. “Hay negociaciones y enmiendas que tienen que ocurrir… Pero tenemos una fila de demócratas que quieren subirse a bordo, al mismo tiempo que algunxs republicanos quieren esperar hasta que pasen sus primarias para subirse al proyecto. Así que estamos esperando pacientemente a que pasen algunas de estas cosas”.

Unidad en torno a la legalización del cannabis

“La Ley MORE, la Ley SAFE… van a morir en el Senado. Y el único que quede en pie, el único proyecto de ley que quede en la mesa, será la Ley de Reforma de los Estados, y será igualmente republicana y demócrata. Quiero que sea bipartidista, quiero crear consenso”, dijo Mace.

“Como republicana, como conservadora, como miembro novato de la minoría en el Congreso, aprobé cuatro proyectos de ley en mis primeros 14 meses en el cargo. Así que se puede hacer si se tiene a las personas adecuadas con la mentalidad correcta, el mensaje correcto en la mesa”.

El cannabis ha demostrado ser un tema bipartidista, casi sin partido. Entonces, ¿qué les dice a quienes están enfadadxs porque se lo “robó” a lxs demócratas?

“Si yo soy la perturbadora, está bien. Pero no se ha hecho de forma pragmática y con sentido común, o el gobierno federal lo va a fastidiar y hará que el entorno sea peor de lo que es”.

Contenido relacionado: La Guerra contra las Drogas y sus Orígenes Racistas

“La guerra contra las drogas ha sido perjudicial, especialmente para las comunidades racializadas que se ven afectadas de forma desproporcionada por las detenciones por cannabis. Así que, si quieres asegurarte de que se hace bien y de forma responsable, lxs republicanos tienen que formar parte de esa conversación”.

“En el ambiente político actual, (no sé cómo es en Argentina o Buenos Aires, pero aquí), los extremos están tan a la derecha, tan a la izquierda… La gente se enfada si intentas construir un consenso, a veces. ¿Por qué trabajan juntxs? ¿Por qué se alaban?”. dijo Mace.

“Me niego a formar parte de eso. Quiero ser parte de una solución, no parte del problema, porque nuestro país y el mundo necesitan un liderazgo fuerte, audaz y de centro en muchos de estos temas que unan a la gente.”

Raíces conservadoras y trayectoria de voto

“Si miras mi historial de votos, es bastante conservador. Pero luego llego al otro lado del pasillo y, cuando estoy de acuerdo con la izquierda, trabajo con la izquierda, porque es una responsabilidad que tengo como legisladora electa. A veces es difícil encontrar a esas personas que están dispuestas a trabajar contigo y a aguantar las tonterías que van a recibir de otros dentro de su partido o de su base. Pero eso es lo que tenemos que hacer, si queremos mejorar nuestro país y el mundo”.

¿Es la Ley de Reforma del Estado una apuesta más segura que MORE y SAFE?

La Ley MORE se está debatiendo en el Senado y la Ley Bancaria SAFE probablemente altere menos las plumas, ya que sólo aborda la banca del cannabis y no la legalización. Entonces, ¿por qué se aprobaría la Ley de los Estados? ¿Por qué es el proyecto de ley más fuerte?

Contenido relacionado: Ley SAFE de EEUU: Para Qué Sirve y En Qué Falla

En primer lugar, respondió Mace, es bipartidista. Y “permite a los estados estar en el asiento del conductor, tener el control sobre su reforma del cannabis, legalizarlo en la forma que quieran o tengan ya”.

“47 de los 50 estados de Estados Unidos tienen CBD legal o más. Así que es hora de que el gobierno federal se quite de en medio, que proporcione un marco para legalizarlo… Estas empresas que valen miles de millones de dólares en la industria ahora mismo no pueden ni siquiera bancarizarse. Menos del 10% de ellas tienen acceso a una institución financiera o a un banco, no pueden obtener préstamos. Es un negocio peligroso cuando se trata de tanto dinero en efectivo y, en algunos casos, estamos incentivando los mercados ilícitos”.

Mace señaló que su proyecto de ley resolvería ese problema. “En realidad, con mi proyecto de ley no se necesita la Banca Segura, porque mi proyecto de ley hace que el negocio sea legal; se tiene acceso a todos los préstamos y a la financiación y a las instituciones bancarias y financieras, como cualquier negocio legal y operativo“.

La otra diferencia con MORE y el proyecto de ley del senador Schumer, son los impuestos bajos, muy, muy bajos, al 3%. “Quieres que los impuestos sigan siendo bajos para no fomentar un mercado ilícito o un mercado ilegal”.

Amplia participación en la redacción del proyecto de ley

“Nos hemos reunido con grupos de presión, abogadxs y líderes y CEOs de la industria, pequeños y grandes, para obtener aportes. El proyecto de ley ha tardado unos nueve meses en elaborarse. Pusimos los puntos sobre las íes y obtuvimos un proyecto de ley completo y bien pensado, que resistiría cualquier caso judicial y cualquier escrutinio, y que sería un proyecto de ley verdaderamente bipartidista, capaz de llegar a la línea de meta este año u otro”, concluyó Mace.

Vía Benzinga, traducido por El Planteo.

The post Una Charla con Nancy Mace, la Legisladora Conservadora Detrás del Mayor Proyecto de Legalización de Cannabis en EEUU appeared first on High Times.

Cannabis YouTuber Chrissy Harless’s Channel Deleted Without Explanation

According to an interview on April 5 with WeedTube Co-founder Arend Richard, creating cannabis video content is Chrissy Harless’s livelihood. “It is my [sole] income. It is my business. HarlessMediaGroupLLC. It is… the way that my husband is now at home working with us. How we are able to spend more time with our kids and have happier lives,” Harless said. “[YouTube is] able to promote gambling on ads, pharmaceuticals on ads, alcohol. YouTube [is] able to accept the money from their advertisers to promote it in ads. These are all regulated industries as well, but a content creator isn’t allowed to do the same? I don’t even glorify it. I don’t over consume. I’m very educational.” Harless’s usual content consisted of reviews and unboxing videos for various cannabis-related products.

With the deletion of her channel, Harless estimates that not only her family will be affected, but also the many brands she frequently worked with. “Small businesses. Almost every single one of them is a small business. An Etsy shop or a mom-and-pop kinda situation. It’s a diverse group of small businesses just trying to share something safe.” Harless believes that the account termination may have been caused by linking to these companies and products, but she received no official explanation from YouTube.

Her Instagram account was also banned recently, but after a month of action, she was at least able to regain ownership of it. When asked why she keeps trying, she replied that it’s just what she enjoys doing. “Because I have a passion for it, and I love it,” she explained. “It’s benefited my life and helped me find happiness in my life. And I know that other people will benefit from this. I know that other people do benefit from it.”

Harless mentioned that she’ll be moving to operate on WeedTube going forward. “I wish that a lot more people would rely on The WeedTube! For their views, for their content consumption of cannabis in general,” Harless said. “Because it is truly the only safe platform that you can share and not be concerned. And everyone on there is still responsible about it. [YouTube] making this a point is showing that there’s still so much of a stigma. Like they just assume that cannabis is dangerous. It’s not. [YouTube and Google] don’t understand how safe this [cannabis] is.”

According to Richard, it’s the perfect platform to find an unlimited amount of cannabis video content. “What I can say for sure, is that WeedTube will always remain open to the cannabis community to post their content freely,” Richard concluded. “We were founded by deleted creators, for deleted creators. We never stopped serving that purpose, and we look forward to bringing the cannabis community even more functionality to combat all the censoring social media today.”

The trend of YouTube account termination for cannabis content began to ramp up four years ago in 2018. At the time, accounts owners reported receiving three strikes before an account was officially deleted (although the time frame of when the account would officially be deleted seemed to vary). In Harless’s case, she received no strikes at all prior to the account termination (although she does mention a strike that she received about two years ago).

WeedTube began a campaign to bring attention to cannabis censorship on Instagram in March, including a petition that requests Instagram leadership to “join a roundtable discussion with experts in the cannabis industry to update their policies and regulations around legal cannabis content to provide fair and equal opportunity to our rapidly growing industry.”

The post Cannabis YouTuber Chrissy Harless’s Channel Deleted Without Explanation appeared first on High Times.

Cannabis YouTuber Chrissy Harless’s Channel Deleted Without Explanation

According to an interview on April 5 with WeedTube Co-founder Arend Richard, creating cannabis video content is Chrissy Harless’s livelihood. “It is my [sole] income. It is my business. HarlessMediaGroupLLC. It is… the way that my husband is now at home working with us. How we are able to spend more time with our kids and have happier lives,” Harless said. “[YouTube is] able to promote gambling on ads, pharmaceuticals on ads, alcohol. YouTube [is] able to accept the money from their advertisers to promote it in ads. These are all regulated industries as well, but a content creator isn’t allowed to do the same? I don’t even glorify it. I don’t over consume. I’m very educational.” Harless’s usual content consisted of reviews and unboxing videos for various cannabis-related products.

With the deletion of her channel, Harless estimates that not only her family will be affected, but also the many brands she frequently worked with. “Small businesses. Almost every single one of them is a small business. An Etsy shop or a mom-and-pop kinda situation. It’s a diverse group of small businesses just trying to share something safe.” Harless believes that the account termination may have been caused by linking to these companies and products, but she received no official explanation from YouTube.

Her Instagram account was also banned recently, but after a month of action, she was at least able to regain ownership of it. When asked why she keeps trying, she replied that it’s just what she enjoys doing. “Because I have a passion for it, and I love it,” she explained. “It’s benefited my life and helped me find happiness in my life. And I know that other people will benefit from this. I know that other people do benefit from it.”

Harless mentioned that she’ll be moving to operate on WeedTube going forward. “I wish that a lot more people would rely on The WeedTube! For their views, for their content consumption of cannabis in general,” Harless said. “Because it is truly the only safe platform that you can share and not be concerned. And everyone on there is still responsible about it. [YouTube] making this a point is showing that there’s still so much of a stigma. Like they just assume that cannabis is dangerous. It’s not. [YouTube and Google] don’t understand how safe this [cannabis] is.”

According to Richard, it’s the perfect platform to find an unlimited amount of cannabis video content. “What I can say for sure, is that WeedTube will always remain open to the cannabis community to post their content freely,” Richard concluded. “We were founded by deleted creators, for deleted creators. We never stopped serving that purpose, and we look forward to bringing the cannabis community even more functionality to combat all the censoring social media today.”

The trend of YouTube account termination for cannabis content began to ramp up four years ago in 2018. At the time, accounts owners reported receiving three strikes before an account was officially deleted (although the time frame of when the account would officially be deleted seemed to vary). In Harless’s case, she received no strikes at all prior to the account termination (although she does mention a strike that she received about two years ago).

WeedTube began a campaign to bring attention to cannabis censorship on Instagram in March, including a petition that requests Instagram leadership to “join a roundtable discussion with experts in the cannabis industry to update their policies and regulations around legal cannabis content to provide fair and equal opportunity to our rapidly growing industry.”

The post Cannabis YouTuber Chrissy Harless’s Channel Deleted Without Explanation appeared first on High Times.

Un Concejal Brasilero Empapeló su Ciudad con el Lema: ‘¡Legaliza! Remedio, Trabajo e Ingreso para Quien lo Necesite’

Nota por Hernán Panessi y Wagner Bordin publicada originalmente en El Planteo. Más artículos por El Planteo en High Times en Español.

Síguenos en Instagram (@El.Planteo) y Twitter (@ElPlanteo).

Por estos días, unos llamativos carteles irrumpieron sobre las calles de Recife, la capital del estado de Pernambuco, al nordeste de Brasil: “¡Legaliza! Remedio, trabajo e ingreso para quien lo necesite”. Y al costado, la sonrisa barbuda de Iván Moraes, activista cannábico y concejal por el Partido Socialismo y Libertad (PSOL). Con su gesto, subió la temperatura de la opinión pública y generó un revuelo doméstico.

“Comprendo la legalización de la marihuana y los cambios en las políticas prohibicionistas como una pauta central de los derechos humanos”, cuenta Moraes en exclusiva a El Planteo y Weederia desde su oficina en Recife.

Contenido relacionado: Energía Solar en las Favelas de Río de Janeiro: Conocé Revolusolar, un Nuevo Modelo Sostenible y Comunitario

Con 20 años de militancia por los derechos humanos, Moraes está acostumbrado a dar discusiones en todos los ámbitos posibles. “La prohibición dio resultados muy negativos para la mayoría de la sociedad”, dice el concejal, haciendo hincapié en la criminalización de los usuarios de cannabis y en lo reciente de la prohibición.

Ya van como 3000 años de maconha y menos de 100 de prohibición. En nuestro país ocurrió en la década del 30”, señala.

Una vida de luchas

En su formación profesional, Moraes cuenta con una vasta carrera como periodista desde donde promovió la libertad de expresión, las libertades individuales y los derechos humanos. De esta forma, se acercó a tres luchas: el derecho de las mujeres al aborto, la creación de una ley de medios y la promoción de una nueva ley de drogas.

Bajo esos tres verticales, Moraes se incorporó a la política sabiendo que, de fondo, las luchas son de quienes las llevan adelante y no de la política en sí. Como en el caso de la Marcha de la Marihuana en Brasil, que el concejal se encargó de fomentar y promocionar desde el principio.

“Yo soy uno más que contribuyo con la lucha. Los grandes protagonistas son las organizaciones. Yo termino mi mandato como concejal, pero las organizaciones van a seguir”.

Contenido relacionado: Marihuana Medicinal en Brasil: Sorprendente Apoyo a la Legalización entre Partidarios de Bolsonaro

Hace falta coraje

Entretanto, desde su lugar como activista y político, Moraes advierte la demanda de las familias y de los usuarios que piden por la legalización total del cannabis de uso medicinal. “Con los carteles busqué causar un impacto. La criminalización de la planta nos trae un problema político y social muy grande. ¿Qué falta para avanzar? Yo diría que coraje”, embiste.

En Brasil, las modificaciones de la Ley de Drogas permiten a usuarios autorizados conseguir su medicina. ¿Cómo? Con el aval oficial para el cultivo o bien en dispensarios. No obstante, cualquier aceite no baja de los R$ 2000 reales (poco más de u$s 400 dólares) y todos los procesos de adquisición pasan por un tendal de burocracias, abogados y jueces.

A través de ordenanzas de Anvisa (la agencia reguladora de salud brasileña), los usuarios autorizados pueden obtener sus medicamentos. ¿De qué manera? Con un habeas corpus de cultivo, a través de importaciones autorizadas, vía asociaciones o en farmacias.

Por caso, en las farmacias hay pocas opciones disponibles y los precios rondan los R$ 2.000 reales (poco más de u$s 200). Para realizar la importación, el precio -con envío- se acerca a los R$1.000 reales, casi el valor del salario mínimo brasileño: R$ 1.212,00, unos u$s 240 dólares.

Desde ahí, el reclamo de Moraes, que aboga por la posibilidad de que Pernambuco, un estado de mucho sol y mucha agua (clima perfecto para el cultivo), pueda albergar plantaciones de cannabis que abastezcan las necesidades de sus habitantes sin necesidad de importar la planta. Y, de esta manera, bajar los costos y, además, aportar mano de obra local.

De la pirotecnia pública a los comentarios positivos

En ese sentido, el PSOL viene discutiendo desde hace tiempo su perspectiva con respecto al cannabis. “No tuve ningún problema con los miembros de mi partido, pero en Brasil hay una parte de la sociedad que acompaña a la política más conservadora”, analiza Moraes.

Contenido relacionado: Brasil: Importación de CBD Creció un 40% en 2021 ¿Cuántos Millones se Gastaron?

“Algunos aprovecharon para aparecer y promoverse. Quieren causar conflicto. La ultraderecha suele funcionar igual en todo el mundo: encuentran un enemigo, en este caso la planta, y buscan ser combativos. Muchos políticos quieren ser electos aprovechando este caso para hacer pirotécnica pública”, continúa.

De hecho, en la semana en que Moraes abogó por la legalización, algunos miembros de la cámara elevaron un petitorio que pedía un repudio a su persona. “Nunca en Recife se aprobó un repudio a otro concejal. Hubo mucha gente que se aprovechó de la situación”, describe.

Sin embargo, el concejal del PSOL no se siente atacado personalmente, sino que divisa que aquella embestida tuvo que ver con objetivos electorales. “Tengo mucha tranquilidad porque estoy en el lado correcto de las cosas”.

Y en sus redes sociales, una inmensa mayoría de comentarios positivos invadieron sus posteos. “Creo que la población brasilera está preparada para tener esta discusión. La favela está lista. La universidad está lista. Las personas quieren que se dé este debate, están interesadas en ello”, explica.

La sociedad está preparada para la discusión

A la sazón, mientras espera por el tratamiento legislativo de una nueva Ley Federal de Drogas, Moraes junto a diversos actores sociales, científicos y civiles armó un dossier de marihuana medicinal. Se trata de un trabajo extenso que democratizará información médica, data sobre profesionales de la salud y argumentos varios.

Pedimos que la alcaldía forme a sus cuadros médicos para que puedan recetar marihuana medicinal. Y quiero que ese programa salga ahora. Aquí tenemos laboratorios y tenemos territorios que usamos para caña de azúcar y que podrían usarse, también, para plantar medicina. Hoy, con la ley que existe, los laboratorios no pueden producir. Lo que sobra, puede ir para cosméticos, champús y jabones. Y lo que no da para eso, puede destinarse a productos de fibra. Es un plan perfecto”.

Contenido relacionado: Evento Centrado en el Uso Medicinal del Cannabis llega a Brasil: São Paulo, 3-6 Mayo

—¿Y qué falta para que avance la discusión en torno al cannabis?

—Existe una clase política que asume que la población es conservadora, que no está preparada. Los políticos encuentran que pueden perder votos. La población quiere debatir, quiere remedios. No es que la población no quiere discutir, es que a los gobernantes les falta ese coraje. Están amarrados en el conservadurismo. Por otro lado, existe en Brasil un grupo, que no es tan grande, pero sí muy barullero: los políticos conservadores, bolsonaristas de extrema derecha, que divulgan noticias falsas. Así se hace difícil.

—Para encontrar el éxito, la política debe llegar a cierta concordia. ¿Cómo se discute con la oposición en un tema que genera tanta polarización y en el que hay posiciones tan definidas?

—Yo discuto con la oposición con mucho placer. Milito hace 20 años y llevo 6 como político. Es mi día a día. Con los políticos que no quieren discutir, aquellos que sólo quieren aparecer, yo no discuto. Sí aprovecho las oportunidades que me dan y gusto de discutir. “¿Vos conocés a alguien que haga uso abusivo de cualquier sustancia?”, les digo.“Conozco”, me responden, porque todo el mundo conoce a alguien en esa situación. “¿Te gustaría que esa persona fuese presa o terminara muerta? ¿O preferirías que esté cuidada?”, retruco.“Cuidada”, me dicen. Bueno, con la ley que hay, van presas o pueden terminar muertas. Si querés cuidar, ¿cómo vas a criminalizar?

La política como misión

Así, Moraes promueve una nueva política de drogas donde los usuarios problemáticos no vayan presos, sino que su vida mejore. ¿Cómo? Con reducción de daños y  la promoción de centros de acompañamiento, entre otras cuestiones.

“Los conservadores hablan de presos. Y no están presos por la maconha, están presos porque está prohibida. Es una planta. No hay que tenerle miedo”, describe.

Y en un año electoral, Iván Moraes, quien ya lleva dos períodos como concejal y apoyará a Lula Da Silva en las presidenciales (“¡Fuera Bolsonaro!”, insiste una y otra vez), va ahora por un lugar como diputado estatal.

Contenido relacionado: ¿Consumir Cannabis Mejora Tu Calidad de Vida? Estudio Brasileño Investiga

“En la política no se puede hacer carrera, tiene que ser una misión. Yo no soy concejal o, si todo sale bien, diputado. Yo soy padre, comunicador, activista y defensor de los derechos humanos”, concluye.

Fotos cortesía de Iván Moraes

The post Un Concejal Brasilero Empapeló su Ciudad con el Lema: ‘¡Legaliza! Remedio, Trabajo e Ingreso para Quien lo Necesite’ appeared first on High Times.

Story of Jews and Cannabis at YIVO Opens in New York Tomorrow

The YIVO Institute for Jewish Research is launching a new, in-person exhibition called Am Yisrael High: The Story of Jews and Cannabis on May 5 at the Center for Jewish History building in New York City. The event will also be livestreamed for remote viewers.

Running from this week through the end of the year, the exhibit highlights the largely overlooked connection between Judaism and cannabis throughout history. While it’s well known that there are religious connections to cannabis, specifically in the Judo-Christian tradition, Rastafarians get most of the press coverage relating to sacramental usage of the coveted holy herb.

Courtesy of YIVO. 420=עשן. Art by Steve Marcus, 2022. YIVO Archives.

According to the exhibit’s press release, references to cannabis appear in the Bible (a fact many Christians know as well), the Talmud, and numerous other Jewish texts. Rabbis have written on the subject, and cannabis has been used for medicinal purposes and during rituals.

There are also celebrations to be had of Jewish contributions to the world of cannabis and medical sciences, which are also highlighted in the exhibit. It also features famous counterculture icons in cannabis and businesspeople who fall under the Jewish umbrella. One can follow the history of the plant, along with the history of Jewish cannabis enthusiasts.

The exhibit also features cannabis-centric art from the culture, including menorah bongs, an item that sounds like it might make its way into a Hanukkah celebration in the near future.

“While activity in the many realms of cannabis involves all kinds of people, not only members of the tribe, many Jews have played significant roles in a number of aspects related to cannabis and their connection warrants inquiry,” said Eddy Portnoy, YIVO’s academic advisor & exhibitions curator and author of Bad  Rabbi: And Other Strange But True Stories from the Yiddish Press according to a press release. “The story of Jews and cannabis begins in ancient times and connects to religion, science, medicine, and law. It’s a story that continues to evolve.” 

Portnoy is a specialist on Jewish popular culture who currently serves as Academic Advisor for the Max Weinreich Center and Exhibition Curator at the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research. In addition to his writing and research, he has curated other exhibits for YIVO in the past.

Am Yisrael High will kick off with an opening night event at 7:00 p.m. (ET) featuring a panel discussion moderated by Portnoy. Panelists include horticulturist, educator, and legalization activist Ed Rosenthal; attorney Adriana Kertzer, Rabbi/Dr. Yosef Glassman; and journalist Madison Margolin. Their discussion will consider the many connections of the Jews to cannabis—religious and spiritual, historical, scientific, and more. 

YIVO
Courtesy of YIVO. Illustration for “Hemp” entry in Dr. Paul Abelson’s English-Yiddish Encyclopedic Dictionary, Hebrew Publishing Company, New York, 1924. YIVO Archives

“While many cultures and religions engage with cannabis in a variety of ways, the Jewish connection has its own unique features,” Pornoy told High Times in an email. “From ritual use to recreation, and from science and medical research to the legalization movement, Jews have been deeply involved in cannabis culture. Combining visuals and artifacts, this exhibit tells the story of the Jewish connection and contribution to the world of cannabis.”

The YIVO Institute for Jewish Research is dedicated to the preservation and study of the history and culture of East European Jewry worldwide. For nearly a century, YIVO has pioneered new forms of Jewish scholarship, research, education, and cultural expression. This new exhibit will join the institute’s physical and digital database of online and in-person courses, global outreach, and resources including an over-400,000-volume library.

Now those who would like to learn how the Jewish tradition connects to cannabis can access a wealth of knowledge on the topic.

To tune in remotely to the exhibit, click here.

The post Story of Jews and Cannabis at YIVO Opens in New York Tomorrow appeared first on High Times.

U.S. Reclassifies Brittney Griner As ‘Wrongfully Detained’

The United States government now considers women’s basketball star Brittney Griner to be “wrongfully detained” by Russia, according to a report on Tuesday by ESPN

Citing “sources familiar with her case,” ESPN noted that the new designation by the U.S. represents “a significant shift in how officials will try to get her home.” 

As a result of the shift, the U.S. and Griner’s supporters will likely be more proactive and public in their efforts to secure her freedom. 

The change “means that the U.S. government will no longer wait for Griner’s case to play out through the Russian legal system and will seek to negotiate her return,” according to ESPN, and that “Griner’s fellow WNBA players and supporters in Congress will be told they have the family’s blessing to bring as much attention to her case as they wish.”

A State Department official confirmed the shift in a statement to ESPN: “The Department of State has determined that the Russian Federation has wrongfully detained U.S. citizen Brittney Griner. With this determination, the Special Presidential Envoy for Hostage Affairs Roger Carstens will lead the interagency team for securing Brittney Griner’s release.”

Griner, a six-foot-nine WNBA champion and one of the most decorated athletes of her generation, has been detained in Russia since February 17, when she was arrested at a Moscow airport over drug charges after she was allegedly carrying cannabis vape cartridges. The charge carries a potential sentence of up to 10 years in prison.

The Russian Federal Customs Service announced the detention in early March, weeks after the arrest. In the announcement, the agency did not identify Griner by name, describing her only as an American women’s basketball player who has won two Olympic gold medals. The announcement also came with a video showing a woman matching Griner’s physical description going through airport security.

In mid-March, Russian authorities extended Griner’s detention at least two more months until May 19.

“Brittney has been detained for 75 days, and our expectation is that the White House do whatever is necessary to bring her home,” Griner’s agent, Lindsay Kagawa Colas, told ESPN in a statement on Tuesday.

ESPN provided some additional details surrounding her detention in its report on Tuesday, reporting that a “source close to Griner also confirmed Monday that former U.S. ambassador to the United Nations Bill Richardson, who has worked privately for years as an international hostage negotiator, agreed to work on Griner’s case last week.”

“The official said that does not mean that Griner is considered a hostage, which is a different legal classification than wrongful detainee. Sources close to Griner said they were not told why she was reclassified, but they were informed Saturday morning that her case had been moved to the special envoy’s office,” ESPN reported. “Until this past weekend, her case had been handled by the consular office, which monitors the cases of any American being held abroad without necessarily intervening. State Department officials notified appropriate congressional committees of the change Monday.”

The shift in designation comes on the heels of last week’s release of former U.S. Marine Trevor Reed from a Russian prison.

Reed, who had been detained there since 2019, was released as a part of a prisoner swap for a Russian citizen who had been held in the U.S.

According to ESPN, “Griner’s team became optimistic about her fate last week” following Reed’s release, which was also negotiated by Richardon.

On Tuesday, the WNBA announced plans to feature Griner’s initials and jersey number 42 on every court this season. The season tips off on May 6.

“As we begin the 2022 season, we are keeping Brittney at the forefront of what we do through the game of basketball and in the community,” WNBA Commissioner Cathy Engelbert said in a statement. “We continue to work on bringing Brittney home and are appreciative of the support the community has shown BG and her family during this extraordinarily challenging time.”

The post U.S. Reclassifies Brittney Griner As ‘Wrongfully Detained’ appeared first on High Times.

Zara Snapp: ¿Cuáles Son sus Propuestas para Legalizar las Drogas en México?

Nota por Ulises Román Rodríguez publicada originalmente en El Planteo. Más artículos por El Planteo en High Times en Español.

Síguenos en Instagram (@El.Planteo) y Twitter (@ElPlanteo).

A los 16 años la mexicana Zara Snapp comenzó a trabajar en temas relacionados a derechos reproductivos y educación sexual.

En ese momento se usaban mucho los conceptos y principios que se utilizan ahora en políticas de droga como “reducción de riesgo” y daños.

En ese cómo hacer que algunas prácticas resulten más seguras es que Zara encontró una vinculación con la política de drogas.

Contenido relacionado: Échele Cabeza: Reducción de Daños, Alertas Sobre Drogas Truchas y Motivos para un Consumo Responsable

“Es que vemos esta intersección con los derechos humanos pero también con todo un rango de intereses políticos y económicos”, cuenta a El Planteo desde Ciudad de México la autora del Diccionario de Drogas.

Sus comienzos fueron en una agrupación estudiantil que colaboraba con familiares de desaparecidos en México.

En ese camino, Zara Snapp se recibió de politóloga en la Universidad de Colorado en Denver y cursó un máster en políticas públicas por la Universidad de Harvard.

Hacedora y madraza

Madre de dos niños, que reclaman su presencia del otro lado del teléfono, es la cofundadora del Instituto Ría, en el que investigan la incidencia en temas de políticas de drogas, no solamente en cannabis, si no en otras plantas y sustancias psicoactivas.

“En México hemos acompañado muy de cerca el proceso jurídico, legislativo y a quienes se identifican como parte de un movimiento reformista en el país”, cuenta.

En esta bandera que ha levantado Zara logró -en un fallo histórico- uno de los amparos en la Suprema Corte que abrió el espacio al autocultivo en México.

Contenido relacionado: México Celebra Despenalización del Cannabis de Uso Adulto, pero Reclaman Mercado Legal

Conductora del programa de televisión Tiempo de Cannabis, también forma parte del comité editorial de la revista Cáñamo de su país.

Otra de sus labores destacadas ha sido la preparación de una reunión internacional para la Asamblea General de las Naciones Unidas (UNGASS).

Allí le tocó trabajar con el gobierno de Colombia -en ese momento el presidente era Juan Manuel Santos- y con el de Uruguay -en épocas de José “Pepe” Mujica-.

“Eso me permitió tener una visión de cómo se toman decisiones en los altos niveles y también entender que las propuestas innovadoras y los cambios realmente suceden desde las comunidades y de una forma muy local”, dice Snapp.

México y la legalización

En una serie de fallos de los últimos años, la Suprema Corte de Justicia de México resolvió que se tiene que permitir el autocultivo.

“De no hacerlo estaría infringiendo el derecho al libre desarrollo de la personalidad, así que ya se creó la jurisprudencia en ese tema”, explica Zara.

zara snapp drogas diccionario legalización

—¿En qué instancia se encuentra la ley que regularía tanto el cultivo para uso medicinal así como el consumo adulto o recreativo?

—En diciembre del año pasado varios senadores y senadores de distintos partidos políticos presentaron una iniciativa y ahora están revisando un anteproyecto de dictamen.

Por lo demás, ese documento es una propuesta para regular toda la cadena de producción.

Contenido relacionado: Mercado de Cannabis en México: Pros y Contras del Negocio que Espera la Legalización

“Serían acciones positivas hacia comunidades cultivadoras con el autocultivo, con un mercado regulado y esto sería para cannabis psicoactivo. Ahora, en esta nueva etapa, decidieron separar cáñamo de cannabis y entonces esta propuesta es solamente por el tema de cannabis psicoactivo para uso adulto”, detalla la especialista.

—Al igual que en Argentina, ¿el cáñamo es una planta prohibida en tu país?

—Sigue estando prohibido en México aunque se importan productos de cáñamo como suplementos alimenticios y medicamentos. Así que se puede importar pero no tenemos ninguna empresa o posibilidad de cultivar cáñamo para comercializar.

En ese sentido, en diciembre de 2021, una empresa consiguió un amparo en la Suprema Corte para llevar a cabo actividades con cáñamo bajo el derecho al trabajo y el comercio.

“Fue el primer caso ganado bajo esos derechos que ya no son entonces derechos individuales sino que es un derecho mucho más amplio y que reconoce entonces las posibilidades y las oportunidades económicas que podía generar el cultivo del cáñamo”, dice.

La ilegalidad: un mal negocio

En México, el 15% de la población es indígena. Por lo tanto, son muchas las comunidades, de distintas partes del país, que están interesadas en participar en el mercado del cannabis, así como también ejidos y comunidades campesinas.

“Mucha gente que vive en el campo sabe que lo que están cultivando, por ejemplo soja, no es lo mejor porque utilizan un montón de agua y que si cultivan cannabis o cáñamo después pueden usarlo, en parte, para regenerar el suelo y que sea algo que también beneficie a la tierra”, sostiene Snapp.

Contenido relacionado: Por Qué México Puede Convertirse en el Mayor Productor de Cannabis

En cuanto a “ilegalidad”, México es el segundo productor mundial de cannabis después de Marruecos y el tercer productor de amapola, después de Afganistán.

“Es importante entender que es parte de nuestra historia aunque no tenemos un uso tradicional, por ejemplo, de la flor de amapola. Aquí hay una relación económica que se tiene que poder aprovechar”, afirma la politóloga.

Narcotráfico

El 80% de los homicidios en México están vinculados al narcotráfico, según datos de la ONG Semáforo Delictivo.

Las cifras oficiales son escalofriantes: desde enero de 2006 a mayo de 2021, unas 350.000 personas han sido asesinadas y más de 72.000 continúan desaparecidas.

—¿Cómo repercutirá en el narcotráfico la legalización del cannabis y de otras drogas que son las que comercializan los carteles de droga?

—En México hay niveles de impunidad arriba del 95%, entonces si tú vas a cometer un delito aquí, lo más probable es que nunca vaya a haber una repercusión, una investigación y no va a haber acceso a la Justicia para las víctimas. Ahora, si tu infliges la ley siendo una persona usuaria de sustancias, es probable que, en algún momento, te vas a topar con las autoridades y entonces te van a extorsionar.

—¿Qué pensás que puede pasar con la gente que vive directa o indirectamente del tráfico ilegal?

—Cuando ya tengamos una ley el gobierno debería empezar un proceso de indultos porque hay personas que han participado en los mercados ilegales de sustancias y nos han dicho: “Nosotros estamos abiertos a transitar a un mercado legal si ustedes nos dan licencia para poder hacer este negocio de forma legal”.

En ese entramado se pone en juego la violencia y parte de un mercado que abarca a otras sustancias químicas como la producción de metanfetaminas.

Contenido relacionado: Invertir en Cannabis en México: ¿Qué Tienes que Saber?

“El Estado tiene la posibilidad de crear los incentivos para que las personas y las comunidades y estos grupos no estatales decidan transitar del mercado ilegal a lo legal. Si el Estado no pone esos incentivos, pues todo más o menos va a seguir igual”, manifiesta Zara Snapp.

—¿Cuál es la injerencia de Estados Unidos y cuánto influye en las políticas de drogas que se puedan llevar adelante en México?

—El papel de Estados Unidos ha sido clave de dos formas: uno en justificar la militarización de la seguridad pública en México y, otro, en justificar ese tipo de intervención, una intervención basada en la guerra y en armar a diferentes actores.

Fotos de cortesía

The post Zara Snapp: ¿Cuáles Son sus Propuestas para Legalizar las Drogas en México? appeared first on High Times.