Thursday, March 12, 2020 Headlines | Marijuana Today Daily News

Marijuana Today Daily Headlines
Thursday, March 12, 2020 | Curated by host Shea Gunther

// Oglala Sioux Tribe approves medical, recreational marijuana (Leafly (AP))

// Oregon Psychedelic Mushroom Campaign Collects More Than 100,000 Signatures For Ballot Measure (Marijuana Moment)

// Spannabis cannabis conference postponed amid coronavirus pandemic (Marijuana Business Daily)


These headlines are brought to you by Curaleaf, one of the leading vertically-integrated cannabis operators in the U.S. With legal medical marijuana dispensaries, cultivation sites, and processing facilities all over the United States, Curaleaf has served more than 165,000 medical cannabis patients and looks forward to helping many more long into the future. Swing over to Curaleaf.com to learn more about this very cool company!


// Washington state to allow social equity applicants exclusive access to revoked cannabis licenses (Marijuana Business Daily)

// Germany launches application process for distribution of domestically produced cannabis flower (Marijuana Business Daily)

// Survey reveals Canadians favor 5 mg or less of THC in edibles (Green Camp)

// Maryland House Votes To Expand Marijuana Decriminalization Law (Marijuana Moment)

// Innovative Industrial Properties Adds Parallel as New Tenant with $35 Million Florida Cannabis Cultivation Facility Acquisition (New Cannabis Ventures)

// Tennessee Senate Committee Approves Medical Marijuana Bill (Marijuana Moment)

// The Vast Majority of California Vape Illness Patients Used Black Market Weed (Merry Jane)


Check out our other projects:
Marijuana Today— Our flagship title, a weekly podcast examining the world of marijuana business and activism with some of the smartest people in the industry and movement.
Marijuana Media Connect— A service that connects industry insiders in the legal marijuana industry with journalists, bloggers, and writers in need of expert sources for their stories.

Love these headlines? Love our podcast? Support our work with a financial contribution and become a patron.

Photo: Will Power/Flickr

Friday, March 6, 2020 Headlines | Marijuana Today Daily News

Marijuana Today Daily Headlines
Friday, March 6, 2020 | Curated by host Shea Gunther

// Boston’s First Legal Weed Shop Is Finally Expected to Open on Monday (Merry Jane)

// New York arrest video makes the case for cannabis legalization (Leafly)

// Oregon Activists Collect Enough Signatures For Drug Decriminalization And Treatment Measure (Marijuana Moment)


These headlines are brought to you by MJToday Media, publishers of this podcast as well as our weekly show Marijuana Today and the most-excellent Green Rush Podcast. And check out our new show Weed Wonks!


// New Michigan rule could increase business for cannabis growers (Marijuana Business Daily)

// Ontario Cannabis Store releases first annual report covering legalization (Marijuana Business Daily)

// Utah’s top medical marijuana regulator is stepping down (Marijuana Business Daily)

// Pot distribution charges dropped against man transporting hemp through state (Rapid City Journal)

// New Justice Department Memo Aims To Block ‘Habitual Marijuana Users’ From Buying Guns (Marijuana Moment)

// VI cannabis advisory board meets for the first time (Vibe High)

// Check Out Leaked Photos of Nike’s New ‘Strawberry Cough’ Sneakers for 4/20 (Merry Jane)


Check out our other projects:
Marijuana Today— Our flagship title, a weekly podcast examining the world of marijuana business and activism with some of the smartest people in the industry and movement.
Marijuana Media Connect— A service that connects industry insiders in the legal marijuana industry with journalists, bloggers, and writers in need of expert sources for their stories.

Love these headlines? Love our podcast? Support our work with a financial contribution and become a patron.

Photo: Daniel Chodusov/Flickr

The Heroes’ Journey

In the foothills
of Mt. Hood, Oregon’s tallest mountain and most active volcano, lies an
unexpected ganja gold mine. Surrounded by towering fir trees and cascading
streams, I arrive on an early autumn evening at the “Heroes Compound” to meet
the esteemed cannabis breeder and cultivator, Patrick Pooler.

“This place was a
massive trash pile when I first started working on it in 2010,” Pooler recalls.
“The people before us had been scrapping cars and cooking meth. You can imagine
the mess they left behind.”

From the meticulously manicured grounds around me, it’s hard to imagine the wasteland this 107-acre parcel once was. Pooler says their cleanup efforts are what gained him and his crew their namesake, Heroes of the Farm.

“It was actually
one of the previous owners that gave us the name,” Pooler says. “It’s what she
called us after she saw all the work we put into this place. The name just
stuck.”

Wandering around
the property is an enchanting expedition. We pass clusters of automated
light-deprivation greenhouses, nine in total, and into a multi-room, fully
flowering indoor operation. The sparkling clean facility holds a perfectly
packed canopy of glittering colas under a hundred or so lights.

We continue the
tour to visit mother rooms and breeding chambers, where we pass vats of
bubbling compost teas, high-tech potting machines and soil steamers. A colorful
sunset transforms the expansive skyline to our west and the sun’s last rays
fade on the perpetually snow-capped summit of Mt. Hood protruding to the east.
It feels like a dream world.

According to Pooler, transforming the hillside property into a world-class production and breeding facility involved removing metric tons of trash, terracing multiple acres of land and securing a three-year, million-dollar power upgrade. Every step, he says, was another massive hurdle to overcome. But this property’s progress adds up to only a small piece of the Heroes’ journey.

(Strain: Gorilla Snacks)

Crossing the Threshold

Pooler says his
roots in the industry go back 14 years to a small closet grow at his home in
Portland. From there, he escalated rapidly from small-scale medicinal cannabis
provider to a lauded industry leader, with a passion for the plant and his
community as his only guide.

He gained initial attention as a breeder, creating a slew of notable strains such as Conspiracy Kush, Marionberry Kush and Galactic Jack and working for a few years with the established breeders behind TGA Genetics.

In 2017, he
jumped headfirst into Oregon’s recreational market, launching the Heroes brand
to the public. His newer strain creations like Gorilla Snacks, Guinness, 8541
and Headdog instantly created a buzz among cannabis consumers and critics
across the state, with fiercely potent, terpene-rich flowers boasting
unbeatable bag appeal.

The company now
consists of around 34 full-time staff members at multiple production facilities
across the state, along with a licensed extraction lab, kitchen, dispensary and
a wholesale distribution center.

In an
ever-changing and challenging regulated cannabis market, Pooler admits he may
have moved forward a little too quickly. His carefree cash-rich days of the
past are replaced with crippling debt and relentless stress.

The Road of Trials

“I’ve always just
kept on pushing, kept on scaling up,” Pooler says. “But I really wasn’t
prepared for the huge overhead of the recreational market, especially as per
pound prices crumbled.”

Even with a
record of consistently selling out of flower, drop after drop, Pooler says he
was forced to scale down his operations in November of 2018 and take a
different approach. Instead of pushing large volumes of product into a flooded
market, the company now focuses solely on top-shelf indoor.

“We are probably
one of the few farms in the state that has a hard time keeping our products on
dispensary shelves,” Pooler says. “We are proud to be surviving in one of the
toughest markets in the nation.”

Pooler says the
most important ingredients for quality flower are “the genetics, nutrients, and
the farmer.”

“First and foremost
are the genetics. I’ve spent the last 14 years hunting and breeding what I
consider elite genetics. Over the last three years we’ve had more than 7,000
phenos we’ve selected from about fifty varieties of cannabis, so the search for
new fire never stops,” he says. “As far as nutrients, I could give you my
recipe right now [he uses only the Oregon-made Nectar for the Gods], but
without the right farmer you just can’t get the same results. Each person that
works here cares just as much, if not more than I do about what the finished
product turns out like.”

Pooler added that
he no longer offers budget flower or anything he considers to be an inferior
product.

“I was selling discounted pounds to a few dispensaries, but then had complaints from customers,” Pooler says. “The dispensaries had turned around and sold the flower at the top shelf price and the customers thought we were ripping them off. It’s just not worth it, we have a reputation to uphold.”

(Strain: Orange Cookies)

Reaching Apotheosis

In 2018, just
before he turned 33, Pooler says he reached what he would call his rock bottom.

“I owed everyone
from my good friends to Uncle Sam a big chunk of money,” he says. “I was
blaming everyone else for the problems I was facing, but in the end I just had
to take things into my own hands and change my future.”

Pooler says the
first thing he took into account was his health, taking on an ambitious
exercise regimen, giving up alcohol, smoking less weed and picking up a reading
habit for the first time in his life.

He then took aim
at changing his surroundings. With a rocky relationship with his county that
included getting zoned out of several costly properties for extraction
facilities, Pooler and his crew joined in the dialogue. They started showing up
to council meetings, organized community service and cleanup events and became
familiar faces to their neighbors, many of whom ardently opposed the cannabis
industry.

“I started
inviting the community over for tours,” Pooler says. “People were asking
questions like, ‘Will I get high from the smell,’ and ‘Are you in a cartel?’
All I could tell them was that I’d be a whole lot richer if either were true.
They may not love what we are doing up here, but now they respect us, and know
we are here for the long haul.”

With a steady
supply of new genetics about to hit the market and freshly licensed facilities
coming online after years of investment, Pooler says he’s optimistic again.

Like the heroes of yore, he has emerged from the belly of the whale, walked through the ring of fire, reached that personal pinnacle your English teacher called apotheosis — or whatever metaphor floats your boat — and emerged ready for the future of the Heroes of Farm.

TELL US, would you work on a cannabis farm?

The post The Heroes’ Journey appeared first on Cannabis Now.

Monday, March 2, 2020 Headlines | Marijuana Today Daily News

Marijuana Today Daily Headlines
Monday, March 2, 2020 | Curated by host Shea Gunther

// Vermont House Approves Selling Weed – But Not Advertising It (Seven Days VT)

// Florida legislators seek partial THC cap in medical marijuana (Marijuana Business Daily)

// Mass. Cannabis regulators ask state legislators to consider loan fund to benefit marginalized groups and small businesses similar to programs in Oakland and Illinois (Mass Live)


These headlines are brought to you by Curaleaf, one of the leading vertically-integrated cannabis operators in the U.S. With legal medical marijuana dispensaries, cultivation sites, and processing facilities all over the United States, Curaleaf has served more than 165,000 medical cannabis patients and looks forward to helping many more long into the future. Swing over to Curaleaf.com to learn more about this very cool company!


// Canada to offer ‘value’ marijuana brands to compete with illegal sellers market (Newsweek)

// Why weed retails love empty bank branches (Crain’s Chicago Business)

// Oregon Advocates Launch Drug Decriminalization And Treatment Ballot Campaign (Marijuana Moment)

// CannTrust’s low stock price prompts another NYSE warning (Marijuana Business Daily)

// Spread thin by budding industry, Minnesota regulators call for creation of state cannabis office (Minnesota StarTribune)

// NY’s new cannabis czar: Recreational pot is ‘right thing to do’ (Times Herald-Record)

// Founder Andy Williams exits cannabis firm Medicine Man Technologies (Marijuana Business Daily)


Check out our other projects:
Marijuana Today— Our flagship title, a weekly podcast examining the world of marijuana business and activism with some of the smartest people in the industry and movement.
Marijuana Media Connect— A service that connects industry insiders in the legal marijuana industry with journalists, bloggers, and writers in need of expert sources for their stories.

Love these headlines? Love our podcast? Support our work with a financial contribution and become a patron.

Photo: Chapendra/Flickr

Hemp CBD Across State Lines: Oregon

The Agriculture Improvement Act of 2018 (2018 Farm Bill) legalized hemp by removing the crop and its derivatives from the definition of marijuana under the Controlled Substances Act (CSA) and by providing a detailed framework for the cultivation of hemp. The 2018 Farm Bill gives the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) regulatory authority over hemp cultivation at the federal level. In turn, states have the option to maintain primary regulatory authority over the crop cultivated within their borders by submitting a plan to the USDA.

This federal and state interplay has resulted in many legislative and regulatory changes at the state level. Indeed, most states have introduced (and adopted) bills that would authorize the commercial production of hemp within their borders. A smaller but growing number of states also regulate the sale of products derived from hemp.

In light of these legislative changes, we are presenting a 50-state series analyzing how each jurisdiction treats hemp-derived cannabidiol (Hemp CBD). Today we turn to Oregon.

Oregon was one of the first states to allow the production of industrial hemp following the enactment of the 2014 Farm Bill. Pursuant to Chapter 571 of the Oregon Revised Statutes, the Oregon Department of Agriculture (“ODA”) oversees the cultivation and processing of industrial hemp, Hemp CBD products, and commodities. Any grower or processors (known as “handlers” in the state) must secure a license from the ODA and comply with comprehensive reporting, recordkeeping and total THC testing requirements.

Oregon is also one of the states that have interpreted the 2014 Farm Bill to allow for the commercial sale of industrial hemp and Hemp CBD products, including products intended for human consumption. “Consumption” means “to ingest, inhale, topically apply to the skin or hair.” This means that Oregon permits the sale and marketing of Hemp CBD foods, non-alcoholic beverages, dietary supplements, cosmetics and smokables so long as they contain no more than 0.3% total THC and are free of certain chemicals.

Another unique aspect of Oregon hemp law is that it provides an opportunity for ODA-licensed growers and handlers to sell and transfer their products to the state’s marijuana recreational market so long as they satisfy certain licensing, testing, labeling and recordkeeping requirements.

Although the hemp rules only regulate the production and sale of hemp and Hemp CBD products within the state, ODA-licensed growers and handlers are free to sell or transfer these products outside of the state so long as they contain no more than 0.3% total THC. Under Oregon law, the exportation (and importation) of hemp and Hemp CBD products containing more than 0.3% total THC is strictly prohibited. This means that out-of-state growers, processors, manufactures and distributors wishing to sell their Hemp CBD products in Oregon must also ensure compliance with Oregon’s total THC testing standards before their product cross state lines. Violating this law is a Class C felony.

When it comes to transportation, the ODA rules mandate that any industrial hemp or industrial hemp seeds transported within the state be accompanied by a copy of the hemp registration and a copy of the pre-harvest test results that corresponds to the harvest lot in transit.

Earlier this year, the ODA submitted a plan to the U.S. Department of Agriculture to oversee the production of hemp under the 2018 Farm Bill. However, the Oregon agency ultimately decided to continue operating its hemp program under the 2014 Farm Bill. Therefore, the requirements currently imposed on hemp stakeholders will remain in place until October 30, 2020.

Currently, the Oregon legislature is technically still in session: we previewed Senate Bill 1561 and the other hemp-related draft bills here. Unfortunately, the session is now hanging by a thread due to a controversial walk out, and there is a chance we don’t see a state hemp plan for commercial production and sale, a state hemp commission, or any of the other hemp-related proposals that seemed to have real legs before the session.

For more updates on Oregon’s Hemp CBD laws, stay tuned to the Canna Law Blog. And for previous coverage in this series, check out the links below:

These Are the States With the Most Cannabis Dispensaries

Now that marijuana legalization is taking hold across the country, the cannabis industry is really starting to bud. Ahh, get it? At any rate, in the 40 odd states that have legalized the leaf for medicinal and recreational use — see, there are so many legal jurisdictions that we’ve actually lost count — we are starting to witness an uprising in cannabis dispensaries, all of them dedicated to servicing the legions of cannabis customers out there champing at the bit to buy legal weed. Indeed, droves of people are standing in lines at these retail shops ready to get their hands on pot. It’s a wild scene unmatched by anything with maybe the exception of the lines to get in to see Mr. Bungle during their recent Raging Wrath shows. But other than that, we’re talking stoner fandom here, folks. Like, it’s readily apparent that America reaaally wants to be high.

Well, as with anything in this world, there’s always a group of scientific minds ready to roll up their sleeves to dissect what’s really going on out there. Marijuana is no exception. So, the folks at Verilife, which operates dispensaries in several states, recently buckled down to determine just how many marijuana dispensaries are in the United States. But they weren’t going to stop there, no siree. They also wanted to find out which states and cities had the most dispensaries and which ones were contributing the most tax revenue to their respective pot. Hello? Is this thing on?

While states like CaliforniaWashington and Colorado obviously led the pack in terms of collecting tax revenue from the sale of legal weed, some of the results of this exploration into dispensaries might surprise you. So, without further a due, here are the 10 states with the most dispensaries per capita.

10. California

Man, no wonder the Golden State is having such a hard time taking its cannabis trade into the realm of the legit. The study finds it only has 1.6 marijuana dispensaries per 100,000, which hardly seems enough to service all of those in need. Nevertheless, the state still threw down $354 million in tax revenue in 2018. Sure, that’s a bit lower than the initial projections, but it’s still more than any other legal state. Two of its cities have more dispensaries than anywhere else. It looks like the best place to find weed is in Cathedral City (12th in the nation) and Santa Cruz (25th). They have 11.8 and 6.2 marijuana dispensaries per 50,000, respectively, the study finds.

9. Michigan

The state recently launched its recreational sector after running a medical marijuana program for several years. It has 1.7 dispensaries per 100,000, according to the study, contributing in the neighborhood of $2.4 million in pot taxes. Incidentally, however, none of its cities made the list of most dispensaries.

8. Nevada

It only stands to reason that a state that is home to jurisdictions where gambling and prostitution are legal should be on the list of most marijuana dispensaries, as well. The study shows that the Silver State has 2.4 dispensaries per 100,000. These operations are contributing $69.8 million a year in tax revenue. Still, none of its cities ranks among those with the most dispensaries.

7. New Mexico

The state has been pushing recently for recreational marijuana, but it’s probably going to have to settle for its medicinal sector for a while longer. Still, it’s not too shabby based on the number of available dispensaries. The state has 5.2 dispensaries per 100,000, and it is collecting $9 million in annual tax revenue. It has only one city on the list of most dispensaries. Santa Fe came in at 28th with 5.9 per 50,000.

6. Washington

One of the first states in America to legalize for recreational use, Washington has 6.2 cannabis dispensaries per 100,000. It also came in second nationwide in terms of producing money, the study finds, generating $319 million in tax revenue per year. It is also where you can find  a handful of cities that topped the most dispensaries list. Bellingham (8.8 dispensaries) and Olympia (8.6) came in at 20 and 21, respectively. Spokane (5.9) made the cut at 27th, while Everett (5.8) sits at 28th.

5. Alaska

While it might not sound like there would be too many places to buy weed in the Last Frontier, it’s slinging more green than one might think. The state has 12.7 marijuana dispensaries per 100,000, giving way to $10.8 million in annual tax revenue. Unfortunately, though, none of its cities had enough dispensaries per capita to make the list.

4. Colorado

Another one of the first states in the nation to make legal marijuana a reality for adults 21 and older sits high on the list. The study finds that Colorado has 14.1 cannabis dispensaries per 100,000. It also ranks in at third on the list for most tax revenue collected, pulling down $266 million per year. And there is a slew of cities where it might seem a dispensary is on every corner. Pueblo (16.6 dispensaries) ranks third in the nation, followed by Denver (14.9) in fifth place. On down the list is Boulder (12.1) at 11th and Colorado Springs (11.7) at 13th.

3. Montana

While we don’t hear too much about the cannabis trade in Montana, it is one of the leading states in the nation for most dispensaries per capita. The study shows it has 15.1 dispensaries per 100,000. But it only pulls in roughly around $1.8 million per year in tax revenue. Even still, a number of its cities have the most pot shops in the nation. Missoula (18.1 dispensaries) ranks in at numeral uno in the country. The next is further down the line. Billings, which sits at 22nd on the list, has 7.3 dispensaries per 50,000.

2. Oklahoma

The state’s medical marijuana sector is set up for big things, the study finds. It is home to 15.6 cannabis dispensaries per 100,000, but most of these establishments are apparently starving to death. These operations are only producing around $70,000 in annual tax revenue. But its cities are set up to sell more weed than any other spot in the nation. Moore (13.1 dispensaries) comes in at 7th on the list, followed by Edmond (12.5) at 9th. But it doesn’t stop there. Oklahoma City (10.6) and Norman (10.5) fall in at 14th and 15th, respectively. Tulsa (10.1) and Lawton (9.6) make a showing at 17th and 18th, and so does Enid (7.0), Broken Arrow (6.5) and Midwest City.

1. Oregon

Oregon should be nicknamed the Dispensary State. The study finds it has 16.5 dispensaries per 100,000, coming in at 4th ($94.4 million) in the nation for collecting tax revenue. Medford (17.1) is the second leading city in the country for the most dispensaries. Eugene (16.1) comes in at 4th, Portland at 6th, Salem 8th, and Bend at the 10th spot. Three more Oregon cities (Corvallis, Springfield, and Beaverton) also made the cut, the study shows.

TELL US, how many cannabis dispensaries or shops are near where you live?

The post These Are the States With the Most Cannabis Dispensaries appeared first on Cannabis Now.

The Four Basic Labeling Requirements for CBD Products

Last week, I attended Portland’s Hemp CBD Connex, an annual event that highlights the vast potential of hemp and CBD.

Of interest to me–because my practice focuses on the regulatory framework of CBD products–was a panel entitled “Weeding Through the CBD Jungle: How to Grow, Run and Be Successful.” This panel was led by two experienced industry leaders: Stuart Bennett, VP of Contract Manufacturing for Canopy Growth, and Alex Rullo, Executive VP of Strength of Hope. Both panelists discussed the dos and don’ts of selling and distributing CBD products in interstate commerce and stressed the importance of complying with the CBD laws of each state in which a product is sold. This was music to my ears!

As you already know if you follow our blog, the Food and Drug Administration (“FDA”) has taken the position that CBD-infused foods and dietary supplements cannot be lawfully sold or marketed in the United States. Yet, states have adopted their own approaches to regulating CBD products that are not necessarily consistent with the FDA’s current position.

Some states, including Colorado and Oregon, allow the manufacture and sale of all CBD products, including food, dietary supplements, smokable products, and cosmetic products. Other states, like Idaho, strictly prohibit the production and/or sale of any such products. A handful of other states, including California, have banned certain categories of CBD products (usually food and dietary supplements) but seem to take no issue with the sale of other products, such as CBD cosmetics.

In addition, some states that have legalized the sale of Hemp CBD products impose their own regulations, including but not limited to labeling and testing requirements.

As we previously discussed, CBD manufacturers and distributors selling their products in interstate commerce should familiarize themselves with labeling and marketing laws in each state where they plan on placing their products. As a rule of thumb, companies should adopt the most stringent rules, such as those imposed by Indiana, Texas and Utah, to ensure compliance across state lines.

While it’s impossible to cover all state labeling and marketing laws in one blog post, I thought I would provide a brief overview of the label components that have become standard in the industry:

The FDA’s General Labeling Requirements

Every state that authorizes the sale of CBD products also mandates, in one way or another, that the labels of CBD products sold within their borders be labeled in accordance with the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act (“FDCA”). Under the FDCA, the labels of any product sold in the United States must contain four basic elements:

(1) An identity statement, which indicates what the product is;
(2) A net weight statement;
(3) A list of all ingredients, which in states like New Mexico and Colorado, must clearly identify hemp and CBD. This requirement makes it difficult for companies that are steering clear from using the term “CBD” in an attempt to mitigate the risk of enforcement action. For more information on this issue, please read here; and
(4) The name and address of the manufacturer, packer or distributor along with their street address.

Scannable Bar Code or QR Code

A growing number of states are mandating the use or a scannable bar code, QR code link or web address linked to a document containing information, pertaining to:

  • the batch identification number;
  • the product name;
  • the batch date;
  • the expiration date, which in some states like Indiana, must be not more than two (2) years from the date of manufacture;
  • the batch size;
  • the total quantity produced;
  • the ingredients used; and
  •  certificate of analysis.
FDA Warning Statement

States like Colorado require that the following statement appear on CBD product labels: “FDA has not evaluated this product for safety or efficacy.”

No Medical or Health Claims

As we have discussed at length, the FDA has limited its enforcement actions against CBD companies that make outrageous and unfounded health claims about the therapeutic values of their products. Nevertheless, many states demand that the labels of CBD products sold within their borders be free of any health claims. It’s important to understand that drug claims don’t need to be explicit. If a company implies that its product can be used to treat a disease, the FDA and local authorities may conclude that the product is a drug.  Consequently, if a CBD company makes any medical, disease, or bodily structure or functional claims or implications about its products, the FDA will likely conclude that the company is marketing unapproved drugs in violation of the FDCA.

Ensuring compliance with the labeling and marketing laws (and policies) of each state in which a CBD product is sold can be challenging, yet it is a crucial step in mitigating the risks of enforcement action by federal and state agencies.

Tuesday, February 11, 2020 Headlines | Marijuana Today Daily News

Marijuana Today Daily Headlines
Tuesday, February 11, 2020 | Curated by host Shea Gunther

// Marijuana giant Acreage concedes Mass. contracts are ‘inoperable’ (Boston Globe)

// OLCC raises THC limits for some hemp products (Register-Guard)

// Bill would drape secrecy over recreational cannabis (Portland Press Herald)


These headlines are brought to you by Atlantic Farms, a Maine-based multistate cannabis business with operations in Maine and Massachusetts. Atlantic Farms is looking for people to help it grow and evolve as investors. Open up TheAtlanticFarms.com for more on the company and email info@theatlanticfarms.com to learn about investment opportunities.


// How Much Cannabis Each State Sold in First Month of Legal Sales (Cannabis Now)

// Seven Governors Talk Marijuana Policy At Annual Conference (Marijuana Moment)

// Illinois medical cannabis stores granted two-hour sales extension (Marijuana Business Daily)

// Ontario weighs cannabis consumption lounges, special-occasion permits (Marijuana Business Daily)

// California wholesale marijuana flower prices holding steady on lack of licenses, growing demand (Marijuana Business Daily)

// Chart: Arizona’s medical marijuana market marches forward in 2019 with more patients, higher sales (Marijuana Business Daily)

// Virginia House Approves Marijuana Decriminalization Bill (Marijuana Moment)


Check out our other projects:
Marijuana Today— Our flagship title, a weekly podcast examining the world of marijuana business and activism with some of the smartest people in the industry and movement.
Marijuana Media Connect— A service that connects industry insiders in the legal marijuana industry with journalists, bloggers, and writers in need of expert sources for their stories.

Love these headlines? Love our podcast? Support our work with a financial contribution and become a patron.

Photo: Will Power/Flickr