5 positive testimonials on medical marijuana benefits from real patients

We’d like to shine a light on a few patients in this article, to share their insights and experiences on how medical marijuana has benefitted them throughout their illness. Please take the time to read through the list of 5 testimonials from real patients who have had positive outcomes from using the herb for their […]

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Tuesday, June 30, 2020 Headlines | Marijuana Today Daily News

Marijuana Today Daily Headlines
Tuesday, June 30, 2020 | Curated by host Shea Gunther

// Colorado Governor Signs Marijuana Social Equity Bill Letting Him Expedite Possession Pardons (Marijuana Moment)

// Dixie Brands a Denver-Based Weed Edibles Company Will Change Name (Denver Westword)

// Oregon Psilocybin Measure Has Enough Signatures For November Ballot Activists Say (Marijuana Moment)


These headlines are brought to you by MJToday Media, publishers of this podcast as well as our weekly show Marijuana Today and the most-excellent Green Rush Podcast. And check out our new show Weed Wonks!


// Arizona Medical Marijuana Sales Hit a New Record High in May (Phoenix New Times)

// Another Cannabis Founder Is Out At Aurora Cannabis (Green Market Report)

// San Diego creates new marijuana business regulatory agency (Marijuana Business Daily)

// Gov. Kim Reynolds signs medical cannabis program changes into law (CBS 2 Iowa)

// Top Baltimore Prosecutor Dismisses Drug Possession Cases And Closes Warrants (Marijuana Moment)

// Acreage Holdings Q1 Revenue Increases 15% Sequentially to $24.2 Million (New Cannabis Ventures)

// Acclaimed Cannabis Advocate Dr. Lester Grinspoon Dies At 92 (High Times)


Check out our other projects:Marijuana Today— Our flagship title, a weekly podcast examining the world of marijuana business and activism with some of the smartest people in the industry and movement. • Marijuana Media Connect— A service that connects industry insiders in the legal marijuana industry with journalists, bloggers, and writers in need of expert sources for their stories.

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Photo: J. Stephen Conn/Flickr

Lester Grinspoon Pioneer of Cannabis Normalization Dies at 92

Dr. Lester Grinspoon, the renowned Harvard scholar whose works boldly challenged the cannabis stigma in an era when it was deeply entrenched in American culture, died June 25 at his home in the Boston area. His passing came unexpectedly, one day after he had celebrated his 92nd birthday. 

His most pioneering work, Marihuana Reconsidered, was published in 1971 and was the fruit of years of research with Harvard Medical School. In addition to a review of the scientific literature and historical material, it included actual first-hand interviews with cannabis users, portrayed without prejudice—a ground-breaking notion for its time. With multiple chapters dispassionately dedicated to deconstructing the propaganda of fear, it concluded with an open call for legalization.

This was given greater legitimacy by the fact that Grinspoon came to the question not as an already-convinced advocate but an objective scholar. As he would admit in a new introduction for the 1994 reprint edition: “I first became interested in cannabis when its use increased explosively in the 1960s. At that time I had no doubt it was a very harmful drug that was unfortunately being used by more and more foolish young people… But as I reviewed the scientific, medical, and lay literature, my views began to change. I came to understand that I, like so many other people in this country, had been misinformed and misled.”

Over the following decades, as the marijuana legalization movement burgeoned, Grinspoon emerged as its top intellectual authority and most respected representative.

He was among the very first to speak out for legalization on Capitol Hill. In 1977, he provided lengthy written testimony to the House Select Committee on Narcotics Abuse & Control, concluding optimistically: “Whatever the cultural conditions that have made it possible, there is no doubt that the discussion about marihuana has become increasingly sensible. We are gradually becoming conscious of the irrationality of classifying this drug as one with a high abuse potential and no medical value. If the trend continues, it is likely that within a decade marihuana will be sold in the United States as a legal intoxicant.”

Of course the backlash in Reagan revolution upset the timeline of Grinspoon’s prediction. But he did live to see a legal market became a reality in several states—and could claim a good share of the credit for helping to bring this about.

Bringing Science to Advocacy Work 

Massachusetts native Grinspoon would be compelled by the conclusions emerging from his research to take an advocacy position, eventually joining the board of directors of the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws (NORML). 

Years after the release of Marihuana Reconsidered, Grinspoon would reveal that one of the cannabis users quoted at length in the book—identified only as “Mr. X”—was in fact Carl Sagan, the Cornell astrophysicist who a decade later would become a celebrity popularizer of science. Sagan’s closing remarks as Mr. X in the book have often been quoted: “The illegality of cannabis is outrageous, an impediment to full utilization of a drug which helps produce the serenity and insight, sensitivity and fellowship so desperately needed in this increasingly mad and dangerous world.”

Grinspoon credited Sagan as the key personality that opened his mind on the cannabis question. 

Dr. Carl Sagan poses with a model of the Viking lander in Death Valley, Calif.
PHOTO Druyan-Sagan Associates, Inc.

Grinspoon also testified on behalf of John Lennon at his 1973 deportation hearing—a proceeding initiated by the US government based on his prior hashish arrest in England. As Grinspoon related to an amused audience at the 2011 NORML conference in Denver, the Nixon administration really “wanted to get Lennon out of the country because he was effectively protesting the Vietnam War.” The immigration officers overseeing the hearing weren’t even clear on whether hashish was a form of marijuana, Grinspoon wryly recalled. The ex-Beatle was ultimately allowed to stay.

 The cannabis question became poignantly personal for Grinspoon and his wife Betsy when their son Danny succumbed to cancer when he was still a young teenager. Cannabis helped him to endure the ill effects from high doses of chemotherapy. This experience propelled Dr. Grinspoon’s interest in the medicinal potential of the cannabis plant. In 1993, he joined with James B. Bakalar to author Marihuana: The Forbidden MedicineThree years later, California would become the first state to legalize medical use of cannabis.

Despite his achievements, Grinspoon was twice turned down for a full professor position at Harvard—something he attributed to the lingering cannabis stigma. According to a 2018 profile on Grinspoon in the Boston Globe, he believed “an undercurrent of unscientific prejudice against cannabis among [Harvard] faculty and school leaders doomed his chances.”

But whatever status he sacrificed for his beliefs among the academic establishment was made up for in the esteem he won from the advocacy community. In 1990 he received the Alfred R. Lindesmith Award for Achievement in the Field of Scholarship & Writing from the Drug Policy Foundation. In 1999, NORML established the Lester Grinspoon Award for Outstanding Achievement in the Field of Marijuana Law Reform, the organization’s highest honor—with Grinspoon, of course, the first recipient. Dr. Grinspoon served as a member of the NORML advisory board until his death. 

As NORML wrote in a farewell statement upon the passing the courageous scholar: “Dr. Lester Grinspoon led the way to insist that our marijuana policies be based on legitimate science. He made it possible for us to have an informed public policy debate leading to the growing list of states legalizing the responsible use of marijuana.” 

TELL US, did you know about Dr. Lester Grinspoon’s legacy?

The post Lester Grinspoon Pioneer of Cannabis Normalization Dies at 92 appeared first on Cannabis Now.

Atomic Bonds: The Increasing Relevance of Delta-8-THC

Nowadays, a compound called delta-8-tetra-hydrocannabinol
(THC) is becoming increasingly common to find in concentrated extracts at
dispensaries in states that allow for the medical or recreational sale of
cannabis products. But from where did this long-lost sibling of delta-9-THC
seemingly suddenly appear?

Quite simply, delta-8-THC has been hiding in plain sight (so to speak) for quite some time now. Our understanding of cannabinoids really began in 1964, when Dr. Raphael Mechoulam successfully identified delta-9-THC, a compound that quickly garnered fame and became known in common par- lance simply as THC.

Mechoulam’s discovery loosened the main thread that finally allowed other scientists to untangle the dense and finely woven skeins of cannabis’ bio- chemical tapestry and therapeutic potential, soon realizing that cannabis is a complex plant with more than 60 identifiable cannabinoids that interact with a neurotransmitter system in the brain and body known as the endocannabinoid system.

Armed with this new knowledge, researchers identified
delta-8-THC in the early 1970s. However, their discovery came with very little
fanfare, given the compound’s low levels of natural occurrence and a potency
seemingly lower than delta-9-THC. The researchers discovered that delta-8-THC
had almost exactly the same atomic structure as delta-9-THC: The only
difference was the placement of one atomic bond in the compound. Of course,
this one small difference can mean the compound has different impacts on a user
altogether.

So, what are the effects of delta-8-THC (here- after referred to as delta-8)? Subsequent to its discovery, some amount of research was done on delta-8 in the United States, including on its efficacy as an antiemetic (i.e. nausea inhibitor) and its potential to aid in arresting tumor growth. However, further exploration of the cannabinoid’s promise came to a standstill almost immediately and it was eventually consigned to some figurative, Reagan-era dusty shelf for over two decades.

Delta-8 extracted and processed by Oleum Labs in Washington state.
PHOTO Oleum Labs

Like so many cannabinoid-related events, delta-8’s reemergence from obscurity and current rise to prominence finds its roots, perhaps unsurprisingly, with Mechoulam. In 1995, his tenacious curiosity about cannabis’s therapeutic abilities had somehow led him back to delta-8 and his team in Israel conducted studies that reconfirmed the potential that American researchers had only begun to uncover. Using the substance’s lower psychoactivity to their advantage, the Israeli researchers discovered they could give high dosages of delta-8 to make the best use of its antiemetic effects without the uncomfortable aspects of the “high” brought on by delta-9.

Mechoulam and his research team almost certainly must have faced a quandary with the choice of delta-8 for their research: Given its low frequency of natural occurrence, how would they be able to source the material needed for therapeutic usage? The answer was found in a U.S. patent filed by Mechoulam and two other researchers much later in 2004. The patent is a recipe for converting the more commonly available cannabinoid CBD into delta-8 and delta-9.

The method is called isomerization, and it uses chemical processes to break the atomic bonds in one molecule (in this case, CBD) and, because it shares the same atoms, albeit in a different arrangement, transforms it into another molecule (delta-8 or delta-9). Indeed, the process of isomerizing cannabinoids was known to Mechoulam since the late 1960s. That process has also been known to the underground cannabis world nearly as long, though its actual utility was questionable at best (see Larry Todd’s 1974 book “Dr. Atomic’s Marijuana Multiplier,” from which any science-savvy extractors will almost certainly get a good laugh).

Current advances in technology have only made the method of isomerizing CBD into the two forms of THC easier in the last decade. Delta-8’s current appearance in the recreational cannabis marketplace is the result of the modern generation of innovative, science-based cannabis extraction artists. The sheer ubiquity of other scientific extraction methods like distillation — which gives us the key ingredient in nearly every vaporizer cartridge and most edibles available for sale — should offer some insight as to how prominently delta-8 may feature into the future of cannabis products (it’s worth noting that delta-8 is already available in distillate cartridges, among other forms). One factor that will almost certainly aid delta-8’s rise to prominence is the availability of the primary ingredient needed to make this converted THC: CBD.

Massive plots of high-CBD hemp (legally
defined as any cannabis plant with less than 0.3 percent delta-9-THC) are currently
being grown in several states and, when harvested, are spun down into pound
upon pound of pure crystalline CBD extract, which can then be relatively easily
converted into delta-8 or delta-9. The sheer volume of CBD crystallite being
produced in the U.S. is currently unknown, but it is easy to suspect that the
amount would be staggering if calculated. It is no stretch of the imagination
to think that the proliferation of retail-ready, lab-assembled cannabinoids
like delta-8 is at hand, if not already well underway.

TELL US, have you ever tried
a product containing delta-8-THC?

Originally published in the print edition of Cannabis Now. LEARN MORE

The post Atomic Bonds: The Increasing Relevance of Delta-8-THC appeared first on Cannabis Now.

Tuesday, June 16, 2020 Headlines | Marijuana Today Daily News

Marijuana Today Daily Headlines
Tuesday, June 16, 2020 | Curated by host Shea Gunther

// Colorado Governor Could Issue Marijuana Pardons Under Social Equity Bill Lawmakers Sent To His Desk (Marijuana Moment)

// California regulator decries cannabis delivery suit as ‘bizarre’ in court filing a month before trial (Marijuana Business Daily)

// Government Agencies Testify In Favor Of U.S. Virgin Islands Marijuana Legalization Bill At Hearing (Marijuana Moment)


These headlines are brought to you by Curaleaf, one of the leading vertically-integrated cannabis operators in the U.S. With legal medical marijuana dispensaries, cultivation sites, and processing facilities all over the United States, Curaleaf has served more than 165,000 medical cannabis patients and looks forward to helping many more long into the future. Swing over to Curaleaf.com to learn more about this very cool company!


// Recreational Marijuana Sales Drop Over 12 Percent in April (Denver Westword)

// More than 7 tons of medical marijuana sold in Arkansas (CT Post)

// Dixie Brands Announces 2019 Annual Results (Cision PR Newswire)

// 4Front Ventures Making Progress On Revenue, Headwinds Remain (Green Market Report)

// Cannabis firm iAnthus says it likely will default on interest payments again (Marijuana Business Daily)

// Former NBA forward Al Harrington wants to make 100 Black individuals millionaires through the cannabis business (CNBC)

// Missouri medical marijuana growing starts; sales expected in 4th quarter (Marijuana Business Daily)


Check out our other projects:Marijuana Today— Our flagship title, a weekly podcast examining the world of marijuana business and activism with some of the smartest people in the industry and movement. • Marijuana Media Connect— A service that connects industry insiders in the legal marijuana industry with journalists, bloggers, and writers in need of expert sources for their stories.

Love these headlines? Love our podcast? Support our work with a financial contribution and become a patron.

Photo: Jimmy Emerson/Flickr

Wednesday, June 10, 2020 Headlines | Marijuana Today Daily News

Marijuana Today Daily Headlines
Wednesday, June 10, 2020 | Curated by host Shea Gunther

// DC Collects Extra 5,000 Signatures to Decriminalize Psychedelics During Protests (Merry Jane)

// Acreage pulls out of Iowa medical marijuana market (Marijuana Business Daily)

// Chart: Medical marijuana sales in Oklahoma near $300 million in first five months of 2020 (Marijuana Business Daily)


These headlines are brought to you by Natural Order Supply, one of the nation’s premier cannabis cultivation supply companies dedicated to streamlining cultivation and helping industrial hemp farmers calculate their price-per-plant cost. They have everything from lights to harvest supplies to cultivation advice!


// Massachusetts regulators developing cannabis product catalog (Marijuana Business Daily)

// Report: NBA won’t test players for marijuana in Disney World bubble (NBC Sports)

// Canada exported record amount of dried cannabis in 2019, but mostly to one market (Marijuana Business Daily)

// New USVI adult-use cannabis bill to go before Senate Friday (Vibe High)

// GOP Congressman Says Killing Of ‘Marijuana User’ George Floyd Doesn’t Deserve Protests (Marijuana Moment)

// Despite COVID, Cannabis Sales To Hit $20.4 Billion in 2020 (Green Market Report)

// Mississippi Lawmakers Take Steps To Distinguish Alternative Medical Marijuana Measure From Activist Version (Marijuana Moment)


Check out our other projects:Marijuana Today— Our flagship title, a weekly podcast examining the world of marijuana business and activism with some of the smartest people in the industry and movement. • Marijuana Media Connect— A service that connects industry insiders in the legal marijuana industry with journalists, bloggers, and writers in need of expert sources for their stories.

Love these headlines? Love our podcast? Support our work with a financial contribution and become a patron.

Photo: Barnyz/Flickr

Tuesday, June 9, 2020 Headlines | Marijuana Today Daily News

Marijuana Today Daily Headlines
Tuesday, June 9, 2020 | Curated by host Shea Gunther

// California Governor Says Marijuana Legalization Is A ‘Civil Rights’ Matter Amid Mass Protests Over Racial Injustice (Marijuana Moment)

// Schwazze To Buy Star Buds Locations In Colorado (Green Market Report)

// Oregon Sold a Record $103 Million Worth of Legal Weed Last Month (Merry Jane)


These headlines are brought to you by Natural Order Supply, one of the nation’s premier cannabis cultivation supply companies dedicated to streamlining cultivation and helping industrial hemp farmers calculate their price-per-plant cost. They have everything from lights to harvest supplies to cultivation advice!


// Iowa Senate approves new medical marijuana bill, heads to Gov. Reynolds’ desk (Siouxland Proud)

// Burglary-related losses total millions as cannabis companies pick up the pieces; insurance coverage unclear (Marijuana Business Daily)

// Ontario Cannabis Store report shows Aurora leading flower sales, COVID-19 sales boost (Marijuana Business Daily)

// Illinois offering $31 million in cannabis tax revenue to repair drug war damage (Leafly)

// Vermont Senate Votes To Double Amount Of Marijuana That Can Be Possessed And Grown Without Jail Time (Marijuana Moment)

// Vireo Health, Bruce Linton Part Ways (Green Market Report)

// Judge orders sheriff in California to return seized marijuana oil, cash (Marijuana Business Daily)


Check out our other projects:Marijuana Today— Our flagship title, a weekly podcast examining the world of marijuana business and activism with some of the smartest people in the industry and movement. • Marijuana Media Connect— A service that connects industry insiders in the legal marijuana industry with journalists, bloggers, and writers in need of expert sources for their stories.

Love these headlines? Love our podcast? Support our work with a financial contribution and become a patron.

Photo: Geoff Livingston/Flickr

A Cancer Survivor’s Guide to Using Cannabis to Cope With Chemotherapy

When I was diagnosed with Stage 3 colon cancer, I decided to get my California medical cannabis card and used medicinal cannabis products for effective symptom management. This helped me avoid taking other pharmaceuticals that could have caused further complications during treatment. There are so many things I wish I would have known then that I know now, but my expertise today helps other patients make empowered choices about their cannabis use.

My first experience in a dispensary left me feeling as though I was doing something wrong and had me fearful of asking questions. When I did ask questions, I received vague answers. In turn, I made mistakes in my self-medication and, though not fatal, at times it was uncomfortable and inconvenient.

Part of the disconnect with my dispensary experience was that I didn’t know how to find what worked for me. We have a broad general knowledge of how cannabis — with its many modes of medicating, chemotypes and cultivars — manifests in the body. But human beings are walking chemistry experiments, which means there will be differences in our reactions. We need to find our personal patterns with cannabis (or any ingested substance for that matter) by paying close attention to what we choose and how (or if) it helps to have a better understanding of how to use cannabis as medicine.

Journaling is a great way to keep track of the types of cannabis you’re using and document their effects. What worked, what didn’t work and why — along with how much of the medicine you took — are important things to track and relay to a dispensary during your next visit. The key is to find the lowest dosage in the appropriate ratios that create the desired effect in your body.

Chemotherapy’s side effects take a huge toll on everyday life. The experience of having to get so much sicker in order to get better impacts not only your body, but your mental health as well. Cannabis can help manage symptoms stemming from both the body and mind and, in some instances, can act as a preventative measure against further damage.

Here are some of the more common side effects of chemotherapy and how cannabis interacted with each of them:

(Please note that each type of chemo has its own particular side effects and some of us are more sensitive to these drug treatments than others.) 

Fatigue

Cancer treatments can leave you wiped out or overstimulated. Inhaling small amounts of uplifting sativa flowers or using a sativa-based low dosage (2.5 – 5 mg THC) sublingual preparation (dissolved under the tongue) can lift your mood without being too sedating.

Insomnia

Insomnia is a common symptom of chemotherapy. If you are having problems getting to sleep, inhaling indica flowers can be helpful. If you are having problems staying asleep, using an indica edible will keep you peaceful overnight. Remember, if you feel a little “stoned over” in the morning, you should take down the volume of the edible. In either case, if there is anxiety around sleep or inflammation with pain, a 1:1 ratio of CBD and THC may be more appropriate.

Infection & Immune System Issues

It’s important to note that though there have never been fatalities from cannabis use alone, there are significant risks around using untested products, dried flowers in particular, if you have a compromised immune system. Untested products can contain mold, fungus or mildew that might mildly irritate someone with a hardy immune system but can sicken or even kill someone with a compromised immune system. Many states require testing nowadays, but if the state where you live doesn’t, ask companies whose products you want to use if they test and ask to see the reports.

Nausea & Vomiting

Using THC in an edible or smokable format during chemo helped me to forgo using anti-nausea drugs after my first day of treatment. For me, that was huge, as the antiemetics proscribed to treat nausea have constipating side effects that, for a colon cancer patient, can be deadly. It’s important to note that though CBD ratios help with nausea, they can also act as an anorectic, which is problematic if you’re already having issues with eating. Eating candied ginger will also help with nausea.

Decreased Appetite

Smoking or eating small amounts of THC will help pique appetite. For patients that are particularly sensitive to THC, I will often recommend trying the non-euphoric cannabinoid THCA. If you do need some CBD in your regimen around meal times, try a 1:1 CBD to THC ratio in either an edible or smokable format because the introduction of THC can help counter CBD’s appetite-reducing properties. I always like to give some non-cannabis advice around this issue as well. The book that saved me while going through treatment is called “The Cancer-Fighting Kitchen” by Rebecca Katz. This book addresses the nutritional challenges of treatment and offers great recipes to address a number of symptoms and get you eating again. I can’t praise it enough.

Anticipatory Nausea & Anxiety

The night before or the day of chemo can cause anxiety and anticipatory nausea. Higher CBD ratios such as 18:1 CBD to THC in an edible or tincture can help take down the jitters and nausea while keeping you clear-headed.

Constipation From Opioid Usage & Opiate Withdrawal

Another challenge during my treatment was using opioids. There were times I needed them for pain management, such as when I had my colon re-sectioned and the tumor removed, or for the intense discomfort I felt from my neuropathy. But the constipating effects were challenging, as were the withdrawal symptoms I felt when I weaned myself off after two weeks of using opioids after surgery. Using THC helped me lower my opiate use by amplifying the analgesic effects of Norco, the medication I was taking, without creating danger. It smoothed out the withdrawal effects as well — the restlessness, pain and sleeplessness disappeared once I started adding cannabis to the mix. Another great tool for avoiding constipation is something you can make at home called “power pudding.” It’s a home remedy involving prunes and bran and you can find many recipes for it online.

Mouth, Tongue & Throat Problems

Chemotherapy targets rapidly dividing cells in the body and does not discern which are cancerous or not. This is why some of us have upset bowels and diarrhea, or experience mouth, tongue and throat discomfort when receiving chemotherapy treatment. Cannabis is great for soothing pain, taking down inflammation and helping in the healing process. Tinctures rich in CBD are especially helpful. However, if you are experiencing mouth irritation, it would not be a good idea to use an alcohol-based tincture, as it will further irritate mucous membranes.

Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy (CIPN)

The platinum salts — including oxaliplatin and cisplatin — used in chemotherapy, along with other chemotherapeutic agents, are known to cause neuropathy in patients. Neuropathy is weakness and pain that one feels, usually in the hands and feet, thanks to damage to peripheral nerves. Some people feel it the first round of chemo, others later in treatment and we all feel it in different intensities and have different recovery times. I am seven years out of chemo and I still suffer from neuropathy. A 2014 study found that CBD prevents neuropathic pain and thermal sensitivity, while not negatively affecting nervous system function or the efficacy of the chemotherapy treatment. Taken before, during and after treatment, patients have reported not getting neuropathy, experiencing it to a lesser degree and bouncing back much faster with less residual pain and numbness.

Skin Changes

Chemotherapy can cause dry skin and inflammation from radiation. Luckily, the skin loves cannabis. Topicals are completely non-euphoric, which makes them a great mediator to use at any time and ideal for those who need symptom relief without euphoric effects. Often times, I’ll suggest a patient use the same high-CBD tincture they are taking for anxiety or pain and apply it as a topical for irritation from radiation. CBD takes down the inflammation and THC helps mitigate pain — and collectively, they help the skin heal so much faster. A topical salve with a 1:1 ratio of CBD and THC will heal dry and inflamed skin with great emollient effects.

After chemo, many patients may find they are still experiencing side effects such as anxiety, residual pain and depression. Healing from chemotherapy is a long process. The cannabis knowledge gained through treatment can also help address this phase in symptom management. In addition, be kind to yourself. As survivors, we must take a restorative approach to healing and learn how to be ourselves in a whole new way.

TELL US, have you or a loved one used cannabis as part of coping with chemotherapy’s side effects?

Originally published in the print edition of Cannabis Now. LEARN MORE

The post A Cancer Survivor’s Guide to Using Cannabis to Cope With Chemotherapy appeared first on Cannabis Now.

Can you get medical Marijuana During COVID-19 in Your State?

The laws around Marijuana vary from state to state. Although there are 17 states (see list below) where weed is still illegal, for both recreational and medical purposes, we have provided you with information on your where can get medical marijuana during COVID-19, in the states where weed is legal. List of States where Marijuana […]

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Why Medical Marijuana in the United States Should Be Legal

Medical marijuana is legal for many Americans, but not all. Read on for why we believe medical marijuana in the United States should be legal for everyone. Just imagine, you are an American living in northern Idaho dealing with constant anxiety attacks. You have tried almost everything and nothing seems to help. Sure, there are […]

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