Episode 420 – Holy Moly! Episode 420!

Hosts Kris Krane, Heather Sullivan, Ben Larson, and Shea Gunther (filling in for Brian Adams) talk about the past eight years of podcasting and the current state of the legal cannabis world while also looking ahead to the MJBiz Conference in Vegas. Produced by Shea Gunther.

If Cannabis is Legal, Why the Police Raids?

If cannabis in Canada is legal, why are there still police raids? Suppose, for instance, you travel back to the 1990s, and you say in the future, cannabis is legal, but police still get funding and make raids on “illegal grow-ops,” you might scratch your head. If cannabis is legal, how are there still police […]

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Can I Smoke Weed at Work?

With marijuana becoming legal in more and more states, the question has to be asked: Can we smoke cannabis at work? Smoke breaks are part of the regular pattern of Solonje Burnett’s workday, though where workers at an Amazon warehouse or a downtown office tower might look forward to state-mandated ten-minute pauses every few hours for coffee or cigarettes (or both), Burnett punctuates her day with cannabis. And everything seems to get done just fine.

“I’ve been on a mission to normalize puff (or joint) breaks while at work for years,” says the Brooklyn-based entrepreneur who is co-founder and CEO of Humble Bloom, a cannabis culture agency, as well as the co-founder and Chief Culture & Community Officer of Honeypottt, a cannabis-focused discounts and promotions management app. For Burnett, who stays plenty busy, cannabis is a key part of that productivity—just as much as updating her LinkedIn profile, hopping on Zoom meetings and attending networking events.

“Cannabis is the medicine I need to get through juggling the many tasks of a creative entrepreneur,” she says. “It’s a matter of maintaining balance, achieving focus, finding flow and staying in a calm, elevated mindset.”

Work and Weed

Though Burnett is self-employed and thus enjoys freedom from the rules that dictate the lives of hourly wage-earning employees, even if she were a worker bee, she has two things going for her. She’s in New York, where the legalization law specifically permits cannabis use wherever tobacco is allowed. And New York also expressly forbids employers from taking action against an employee for off-duty cannabis use. 

You can come back from a lunch break reeking of the joint you just stubbed out, and that’s not sufficient cause to fire a worker in the state, observed David C. Holland, a New York City-based defense attorney. Somewhat controversially, New York’s law also has no public-safety exemption—meaning an off-duty firefighter can use cannabis, whereas a subway operator or bus driver, who may be subject to post-accident testing should a mishap happen on the job, might have to think twice. (Cops could too, in theory, though a NYPD brass revoked an earlier order this summer granting cops that right.)

But not everyone else is so lucky as Solonje Burnett or as a New York City firefighter. As two-thirds of Americans live in states where cannabis can be legally possessed and consumed and the debate over criminalization shifts to Congress and the White House, certain key practical considerations remain unaddressed. 

These include balancing an employer’s right to create a functional and profitable working environment with employees’ rights to govern their own personal conduct. So, can you smoke cannabis at work? 

Worker Protections Lacking in Legalization

So-called “first-wave” legalization states such as Colorado and California don’t have the same protections for off-duty cannabis use as New Yorkers. (Cannabis culture is worth only so much.) This was a flaw that legalization advocates noted and addressed in later laws and have had to return to lawmakers to correct in states that legalized first.

In California, a bill protecting workers from termination for off-duty cannabis use in 2024 recently passed the state Legislature and is expected to be signed into law later this month, nothing in any state law in the country allows you to use cannabis during work hours. 

Yet, as Burnett and others contacted for this article observed, every workplace in America likely has someone under the influence of cannabis while on the clock.

But what does that mean, anyway? There’s a vast gap between responsible, mindful cannabis use to soothe anxiety or stimulate creativity and visible, disruptive intoxication—yet in workplace culture, the two are often treated as one and the same. 

That’s the nature of cannabis drug-testing, where a positive result famously reveals past consumption that may be days or weeks in the rear-view.

Use Weed, Get Fired

The law’s strength has yet to be tested in the courts, but in New York and New Jersey and other states where off-duty use is protected, the only way to get fired for cannabis use is to demonstrate intoxication as well as impaired performance. And that impairment must be clear.

“The odor of weed isn’t enough to get drug tested or disciplined,” said Holland, the New York attorney. “There has to be a clear and articulated observation that the worker isn’t performing up to speed.”

That, however, is also going to lead to problems in the form of lawsuits challenging dismissals, as employers seek to allege that a worker producing 100 widgets a day suddenly slipped to 85 because of cannabis—and attempt to prove it.

“You’re going to see a lot of fabricated claims,” Holland said. But one thing that won’t be tolerated, since it’s not protected, are smoke breaks like Burnett’s. Possession at work and use during work hours aren’t protected acts, so anyone who does like to consume during the day beware.

Unfinished Business

This weird list of conflicting bullet points—you can’t smoke marijuana on the job or during work hours, though many do; you can’t smoke weed at home in some states and be safe from ramifications after a drug-test, though for many, this will never be an issue—leaves anyone searching or offering practical advice in a bit of bind. 

But it also illustrates the incomplete project marijuana legalization remains, even in states where cannabis culture is deeply rooted. Policing cannabis at work is still a technique to control and punish workers. 

And given the different standards applied to blue-collar and service-industry workers compared to knowledge economy workers—many of whom are still comfortably working from home, enjoying the privileges granted during the COVID-19 pandemic, which may also include the freedom to indulge in cannabis—there are racial and classist divides at play, too.

Quiet Quitting

Though for now, in the great workplace debates around “quiet quitting” and dragging workers back to the dreary rigors of commutes, cubicles and business-casual, cannabis use hasn’t appeared as a dividing line quite yet.

“I haven’t heard any complaints, post-COVID or otherwise, about office workers being upset that their co-workers are smoking cannabis at work,” said Ellen Komp, the deputy director of California NORML, one of the chief sponsors of the workplace-protections bill currently awaiting Gov. Gavin Newsom’s signature. 

This could partially be because employers are still in the process of summoning office workers back into the office—and only some employers at that. Many are content to let their workers remain at home several days out of the week, or all of it, if that’s what it takes to keep their people happy and productive.

As for co-working with cannabis, that’s a cultural shift that’s yet to take root, at least officially. For now, American workers will have to make do with a familiar status quo: uneven and unequal treatment, and some unclear directions under the law, rules and culture still struggling to adjust.

“Employers and co-working spaces need to recognize and release their biases,” Burnett said. “Many of us are already high in the workplace. It’s all about responsible conscious consumption.”

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Americans Think Cannabis Is Better Than Alcohol

Americans believe that cannabis is better than alcohol, according to recent research from the Gallup Poll, although respondents were divided on the question of whether cannabis is beneficial for society overall. In polling released earlier this month, 53% of Americans said marijuana positively affects the people who use it. In comparison, only 27% of those surveyed said that alcohol has a positive effect on drinkers.

When asked their views on marijuana’s effect on people, 9% said that weed has a very positive effect on people, while 44% said the effect was somewhat positive, according to cannabis polling released by Gallup on August 16. The research also showed that 30% think cannabis has a somewhat negative effect on users, and 15% said the herb has a very negative effect on the people who use it.

By contrast, polling on alcohol released on August 5 showed that 52% believe alcohol has a very negative effect on the people who use it, while 19% said drinking’s effect is very negative. Only 3% said alcohol has a very positive effect on drinkers, and 24% said drinking has a somewhat positive effect on alcohol users. Those who use marijuana had more favorable opinions of weed’s effect on users. Among those with experience with marijuana, 70% said that cannabis’ impact on people is positive, while only 29% of cannabis users said that marijuana has a negative effect on the people who use it. Interestingly, only 32% of drinkers said the effect of alcohol is positive, while nearly two-thirds (65%) believe alcohol’s impact on the people who use it is negative.

Americans Split on Cannabis’ Impact on Society

Americans’ views on the impact cannabis has on society were almost evenly divided, with 49% saying the effect was positive and 50% saying marijuana has a negative effect on society. Among those with a favorable view, 12% said marijuana’s effect on society is very positive, and 37% somewhat positive. Nearly a third (31%) said cannabis has a somewhat negative impact on society, while 19% said the effect is very negative.

Americans’ views on the effect of alcohol on society were less favorable, with 75% saying the effect is negative, including 55% who said the effect is somewhat negative and 20% who believe it is very negative. Less than a quarter of U.S. adults said that alcohol positively impacts the country, with 21% saying the effect is somewhat positive and only 2% saying booze has a positive impact on society.

While Americans’ views are that cannabis is better than alcohol, Gallup notes that marijuana continues to be illegal at the federal level. But with 38 states already enacting some sort of cannabis legalization and younger adults having a more favorable opinion of marijuana than their elders, continued reform seems inevitable.

“The future of marijuana legalization, at both the federal and state levels, may partly depend on what medical and other research studies show is the impact of the drug on users and society at large, particularly if its use continues to expand,” Gallup wrote in a report on the marijuana poll. “But with young people being more familiar and comfortable with marijuana, their greater tolerance may be destined to prevail over time.”

Research Backs Americans’ Views on Weed and Alcohol

Americans’ belief that marijuana is better than booze is supported by scientific research. Most importantly, cannabis has never killed anyone, while data from the National Institutes of Health show that 95,000 deaths in the US each year can be attributed to the health effects of alcohol, making alcohol consumption the third-leading preventable cause of death in the country. More than 1,600 deaths are caused by alcohol poisoning, while no known lethal dose of cannabis exists. Alcohol also increases the risk of injury, while research shows the opposite may be true for marijuana.

A study published in the journal Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research in 2011 found that 36% of hospitalized assaults and 21% of all injuries are attributable to alcohol use by the injured person. By contrast, some research shows that using marijuana may actually reduce the risk of injury.

Evidence also supports the belief that alcohol negatively impacts society more than marijuana. A 2003 study on the relationship between drugs and violence published in the Journal of Addictive Behaviors reported that “alcohol is clearly the drug with the most evidence to support a direct intoxication-violence relationship,” whereas “cannabis reduces the likelihood of violence during intoxication.” And the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism estimates that 25-30% of violent crimes in the US are linked directly to the use of alcohol, while the government doesn’t track violence related to cannabis use.

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Tommy Chong Electrifies Vegas at Cannabis Conference

Legendary comedic actor and musician Tommy Chong is no stranger to the big stage, whether it be the silver screen, a packed music hall or a podium before thousands of people. He’s earned more accolades than he can even pretend to remember, yet something felt different in Las Vegas on Aug. 24. There was a cannabis award to win.

On hand to receive the Cannabis Conference’s inaugural Lifetime Achievement Award, the 84-year-old marijuana advocate cracked a smile in front of a packed ballroom at the Paris Las Vegas, then looked over at a table where his wife, son and two-year-old granddaughter sat taking in the moment.

“The reason I’ve been very successful is because I know there’s a higher power,” said Chong, one half of the renowned Hollywood comedy duo, Cheech & Chong. “It’s a dream for me to be here.”

Chong was one of six industry leaders honored with a cannabis award at the packed show, part of the three-day annual business-to-business conference held by Cannabis Business Times, Cannabis Dispensary and Hemp Grower that’s known as the more intimate alternative to larger marijuana conventions such as MJBizCon. Sponsored by Fohse, a Las Vegas-based indoor horticulture lighting application and research firm, the leadership awards portion of the event returned for its second consecutive year.

Also honored with cannabis awards were Wendy Bronfein, Co-founder of Curio Wellness; Drew Duval, Cresco Labs’ Senior VP of Cultivation; Ian Hackett, President of Napa Valley Fumé; Kema Ogden, Co-owner of Top Notch THC dispensary; and Lindsey Renner, Owner of Native Humboldt Farms.

Fohse President Ben Arnet said the company backed the leadership awards as a way of giving much-deserved credit to people making positive change in the legal industry.

“We saw people doing cool stuff whether that be through charity or social equity programs, and we wanted to shout it from the rooftops,” Arnet said. “We believe it’s good for people to pull their head up every once in a while from all the work and just get a little recognition for all that they’ve done.” 

Love, Vegas Style

The Cannabis Conference is no stranger to Vegas; this week was the third edition of the event in Sin City after two years in Oakland dating back to 2017 and a pandemic-forced hiatus in 2020. It regularly draws more than 2,500 attendees and 180 exhibitors across its 85,000 square feet of convention space.

Largely thanks to Fohse’s involvement, the bustling convention has added more star power and flare every year. 

Tommy Chong was in Las Vegas just two days before receiving his cannabis award for a lifetime of achievement for Clark County’s declaration of an official “Cheech & Chong Day.” Yet the chance to be recognized for a lifetime of destigmatizing the plant was enough to convince him and his family to hop on another plane from Los Angeles to the desert metropolis.

Chong spent the majority of the day he received the cannabis award signing autographs, shaking hands and posing for photographs at Fohse’s booth on the showroom floor. A smoked-out SUV limo ride to NuWu Cannabis Marketplace on tribal land near downtown Las Vegas offered the legendary cannabis advocate a first-hand look at Vegas’ only operating cannabis consumption lounge.

PHOTO Courtesy of Fohse

“I loved the spot,” Chong said of NuWu. “I admire the Native [American] culture so much. It’s refreshing to see Native Americans leading the way in cannabis, and I believe there’s a lot that the rest of the [cannabis] culture can learn from them.”

Throughout the day, wide-eyed fans and fellow exhibitors greeted the comedy legend as he walked through the Paris and Cosmopolitan Hotels.

Oregon resident Ari Novak snapped a quick selfie with Chong in the Paris casino walkway as Chong and his entourage headed back toward the venue’s convention center. Novak, a 56-year-old engineer, cracked that he “grew up” with Chong.

“I’ve seen every one of [Cheech & Chong’s] skits and I just wanted to tell him that,” Novak said. “So surreal to be here and just randomly see one of my childhood idols walking by.”

Great Turnout

The US cannabis industry has undergone a number of significant setbacks in recent months. Besides the failure of federal authorities to make meaningful progress on banking and decriminalization laws, growers in California have been suffocated by high state taxes and government red tape. As inflation has skyrocketed, California’s bureaucratic hurdles have already put dozens of legal cannabis small business owners out of work. Media reports suggest dozens more could shut down in the next few months. 

Cannabis Business Times director Noelle Skodzinski said the majority of Cannabis Conference exhibitors and attendees come from the Golden State, and event organizers were holding their breath as this week’s event drew closer. The expo saw more on-site registrations than ever, a sign that many exhibitors waited until the last minute to ensure company budgets allowed them to attend.

PHOTO Courtesy of Las Vegas Event Photography

“Honestly, we’re pleasantly surprised with the turnout,” Skodzinski said. “With all that’s going on, we didn’t know exactly to expect.”

Looking forward, Skodzinski said she’s optimistic the California industry’s weed tax and bureaucratic hiccups will be mitigated, if not solved, by the time of next year’s Cannabis Conference. If not, both Skodzinski and Fohse’s Ben Arnet believe massive expansion in other cannabis-legal states—Florida, Oklahoma, Ohio, Connecticut and others—will help fill the void.

Conference organizers have again reserved the Paris Resort for next year’s expo but say increased demand for more exhibition space could eventually force them to move the annual expo to the much larger Las Vegas Convention Center.

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Study: Cannabis Is Good for Kids–and Parents

Paranoia is widespread for cannabis users with children. This fear is logical, and has nothing to do with the drug’s effects per se. Horror stories about hospitals, neighbors or ex-spouses diming out a parent who uses pot to child-protective services—who then remove the child from parental custody—are widespread and common. Many pregnant women have also been hesitant to disclose their cannabis use with healthcare providers, for fear of being referred to child-protective services or law enforcement—an attitude prevalent enough to be documented in a major study last year. 

It turns out there’s a simple and popular policy intervention that eliminates this risk and underlying anxiety, while also improving child welfare outcomes: legalizing recreational marijuana. 

As research from two University of Mississippi economists published earlier this year found, recreational marijuana legalization reduces all foster-care referrals by at least 10%, with greater reductions in years after. The findings suggest “legalization may have important consequences for child welfare” beyond the decriminalization of their parents’ behavior, the authors wrote—and that the impact of legalization on society is profound.

The Truth of “Consequences” 

Legalization’s effects on the foster-care system are twofold, the study found. Yes, parents who use cannabis are less likely to lose custody for their children because they’re incarcerated. And while these findings also support the “substitution” contention—that cannabis legalization discourages the use of other more deleterious substances like alcohol—the researchers also found fewer referrals for seemingly unrelated causes, including physical abuse and neglect. This is evidence to suggest that legalization somehow makes parents better parents. 

“You have to remember that we’re not really writing about the consequences of marijuana use, so much as the consequences on the users’ children,” said John Gardner, an economics professor at Ole Miss, who co-authored the paper with doctoral candidate Bright Osei. “It looks like there’s something going on when parents can use marijuana recreationally: They end up engaging in less physical abuse, less neglectful parenting, stuff like that.”

Add in the knowledge that the act of entering foster care itself can be traumatic to a child (and their family), and what you’re left with is a simple suggestion: Marijuana legalization is good for children and their families. 

“What we see is, it looks like [legalization] is beneficial to kids,” Gardner added in an interview. “Having this option available for adults has spill-over benefits for children.”

And it goes further. Foster care is expensive.  A 10% reduction nationwide in foster-care placements would save $675 million a year, the researchers noted. Cost savings would be good for everyone else, too. So this study suggests that on top of the cost savings associated with law enforcement and the courts, cannabis legalization saves the government even more money, all while boosting early-childhood outcomes.

More Proof Youth Are Alright

The researchers looked at foster-care admissions data from ten states over the past two decades as well as Census data for demographic information.  They found that foster-care entries declined in the months immediately preceding a law taking effect—suggesting that law enforcement and other agencies alter policies in anticipation, but they also found that the decreases continued after legalization, in some cases in excess of ten percent.

The researchers cautioned that it’s not entirely clear whether the decline is because parents are using safer drugs or simply able to better function, but anecdotal evidence suggests it could be both. 

But since foster-care placements went down to such a degree, at the least, the findings are yet another sign that anti-legalization campaigners’ frequent claims that legalization is harmful to youth are specious at best. Repeated insistence that legalization would lead to a spike in youth cannabis use have never been borne out by data. And these most recent findings suggest that children whose lives are not directly touched by cannabis may also be improved.   

Real-life anecdotes support the study’s findings and go one further: eroding the pervasive stigma surrounding responsible cannabis use and responsible parenting. 

“The Stigma Is Completely Wrong”

Sean Maedler is the father of Rylie Maedler, a Delaware teen who started taking cannabis oil medicinally to treat seizures and tumors at the age of 7. Rylie’s ordeal and her activism helped change state law to allow children medical cannabis access. But cannabis also improved her dad’s life. 

A former alcohol abuser, Sean was discouraged from using cannabis by Alcoholic Anonymous, but wasn’t enjoying the side effects of the medications he was prescribed. And, lo: Cannabis reduced his anxiety and tension. Sean was a better person and parent. By this logic, cannabis  improved her husband’s parenting, according to Janie Maedler, Rylie’s mother and the managing partner of the Rylie’s Smile Foundation, which advocates for similar changes in law in other states across the country.

“After he stopped drinking, he was angry,” Janie said. “When we finally got him to try it, it was like an a-ha moment—he was a totally different person.”

Janie is also familiar with the risk of foster care in any situation. A nephew recently left his parents to live with a grandmother. But even in the care of a loving relative, her nephew became quiet and withdrawn. How much worse off would he be in the care of complete strangers, no matter how well intentioned?

The study also gives the lie to some long-standing behavioral mores that still affect parents and parenting. Culture is replete with positive references to alcohol as a parental tonic. While alcohol companies market drinky white wine as “Mommy juice,” parents who use cannabis have to deal with anonymous CPS reports filed by teachers, neighbors or strangers who simply don’t like the plant’s smell. If cannabis is used responsibly, and the parental duties are met, what is the problem?

“There is intense stigma” against parental cannabis use, Janie Maedler notes. “And the stigma is completely wrong.”

The post Study: Cannabis Is Good for Kids–and Parents appeared first on Cannabis Now.

Study: Cannabis Is Good for Kids–and Parents

Paranoia is widespread for cannabis users with children. This fear is logical, and has nothing to do with the drug’s effects per se. Horror stories about hospitals, neighbors or ex-spouses diming out a parent who uses pot to child-protective services—who then remove the child from parental custody—are widespread and common. Many pregnant women have also been hesitant to disclose their cannabis use with healthcare providers, for fear of being referred to child-protective services or law enforcement—an attitude prevalent enough to be documented in a major study last year. 

It turns out there’s a simple and popular policy intervention that eliminates this risk and underlying anxiety, while also improving child welfare outcomes: legalizing recreational marijuana. 

As research from two University of Mississippi economists published earlier this year found, recreational marijuana legalization reduces all foster-care referrals by at least 10%, with greater reductions in years after. The findings suggest “legalization may have important consequences for child welfare” beyond the decriminalization of their parents’ behavior, the authors wrote—and that the impact of legalization on society is profound.

The Truth of “Consequences” 

Legalization’s effects on the foster-care system are twofold, the study found. Yes, parents who use cannabis are less likely to lose custody for their children because they’re incarcerated. And while these findings also support the “substitution” contention—that cannabis legalization discourages the use of other more deleterious substances like alcohol—the researchers also found fewer referrals for seemingly unrelated causes, including physical abuse and neglect. This is evidence to suggest that legalization somehow makes parents better parents. 

“You have to remember that we’re not really writing about the consequences of marijuana use, so much as the consequences on the users’ children,” said John Gardner, an economics professor at Ole Miss, who co-authored the paper with doctoral candidate Bright Osei. “It looks like there’s something going on when parents can use marijuana recreationally: They end up engaging in less physical abuse, less neglectful parenting, stuff like that.”

Add in the knowledge that the act of entering foster care itself can be traumatic to a child (and their family), and what you’re left with is a simple suggestion: Marijuana legalization is good for children and their families. 

“What we see is, it looks like [legalization] is beneficial to kids,” Gardner added in an interview. “Having this option available for adults has spill-over benefits for children.”

And it goes further. Foster care is expensive.  A 10% reduction nationwide in foster-care placements would save $675 million a year, the researchers noted. Cost savings would be good for everyone else, too. So this study suggests that on top of the cost savings associated with law enforcement and the courts, cannabis legalization saves the government even more money, all while boosting early-childhood outcomes.

More Proof Youth Are Alright

The researchers looked at foster-care admissions data from ten states over the past two decades as well as Census data for demographic information.  They found that foster-care entries declined in the months immediately preceding a law taking effect—suggesting that law enforcement and other agencies alter policies in anticipation, but they also found that the decreases continued after legalization, in some cases in excess of ten percent.

The researchers cautioned that it’s not entirely clear whether the decline is because parents are using safer drugs or simply able to better function, but anecdotal evidence suggests it could be both. 

But since foster-care placements went down to such a degree, at the least, the findings are yet another sign that anti-legalization campaigners’ frequent claims that legalization is harmful to youth are specious at best. Repeated insistence that legalization would lead to a spike in youth cannabis use have never been borne out by data. And these most recent findings suggest that children whose lives are not directly touched by cannabis may also be improved.   

Real-life anecdotes support the study’s findings and go one further: eroding the pervasive stigma surrounding responsible cannabis use and responsible parenting. 

“The Stigma Is Completely Wrong”

Sean Maedler is the father of Rylie Maedler, a Delaware teen who started taking cannabis oil medicinally to treat seizures and tumors at the age of 7. Rylie’s ordeal and her activism helped change state law to allow children medical cannabis access. But cannabis also improved her dad’s life. 

A former alcohol abuser, Sean was discouraged from using cannabis by Alcoholic Anonymous, but wasn’t enjoying the side effects of the medications he was prescribed. And, lo: Cannabis reduced his anxiety and tension. Sean was a better person and parent. By this logic, cannabis  improved her husband’s parenting, according to Janie Maedler, Rylie’s mother and the managing partner of the Rylie’s Smile Foundation, which advocates for similar changes in law in other states across the country.

“After he stopped drinking, he was angry,” Janie said. “When we finally got him to try it, it was like an a-ha moment—he was a totally different person.”

Janie is also familiar with the risk of foster care in any situation. A nephew recently left his parents to live with a grandmother. But even in the care of a loving relative, her nephew became quiet and withdrawn. How much worse off would he be in the care of complete strangers, no matter how well intentioned?

The study also gives the lie to some long-standing behavioral mores that still affect parents and parenting. Culture is replete with positive references to alcohol as a parental tonic. While alcohol companies market drinky white wine as “Mommy juice,” parents who use cannabis have to deal with anonymous CPS reports filed by teachers, neighbors or strangers who simply don’t like the plant’s smell. If cannabis is used responsibly, and the parental duties are met, what is the problem?

“There is intense stigma” against parental cannabis use, Janie Maedler notes. “And the stigma is completely wrong.”

I would consider leaving one “marijuana legalization” in for SEO purposes, that’s what people google. 

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