Has the Cannabis Bubble Popped?

Has the cannabis bubble popped? Stocks are down, funds are drying up, and balance sheets are messy. Assets managed by cannabis funds are down by 45% in twelve months. They’ve reportedly lost $2.6 billion from $4.6 billion the previous year. Morningstar, an investment research firm, provided the data. What Happened? Investors blame a popped cannabis […]

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Biden Signs Bill To Take On Rising Meth Abuse

President Joe Biden on Monday signed legislation designed to address the rising scourge of meth abuse in the United States.

The new law, titled the Methamphetamine Response Act, “requires the government to declare methamphetamine an ‘emerging drug threat’ and to develop a response plan specific to methamphetamine,” according to a press release.

The bill had bipartisan support in the House of Representatives and Senate: its sponsors were Sens. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) and Chuck Grassley (R-Iowa) and Reps. Scott Peters (D-Calif.) and John Curtis (R-Utah).

Feinstein, the senior California senator, thanked Biden for signing the bill into law, noting statistics that have shown meth abuse to have “soared in recent years.”

According to a study from the National Institutes of Health, “overdose deaths involving methamphetamine nearly tripled from 2015 to 2019 among people ages 18-64 in the United States.” That study, released last year, showed that the “number of people who reported using methamphetamine during this time did not increase as steeply, but the analysis found that populations with methamphetamine use disorder have become more diverse,” suggesting that “increases in higher-risk patterns of methamphetamine use, such as increases in methamphetamine use disorder, frequent use, and use of other drugs at the same time, may be contributing to the rise in overdose deaths.”

Earlier this month, the NIH reported that an “analysis of law enforcement seizures of illegal drugs in five key regions of the United States revealed a rise in methamphetamine and marijuana (cannabis) confiscations during the COVID-19 pandemic.”

“After working on this critical issue for the last few years, I’m pleased to see our Methamphetamine Response Act has been signed into law after receiving strong bipartisan support from Congress,” Grassley said in the press release. “While meth isn’t a new drug, traffickers are finding ways to increase its potency and widen distribution, which has resulted in a spike in overdose rates. Our new law will help law enforcement better respond to the challenges presented by drug traffickers’ evolving tactics, and it will ensure our federal partners continue prioritizing a response and strategy to address the meth crisis. I’d like to thank Senator Feinstein for her partnership on this issue.”

Along with declaring meth an emerging drug threat, the new law will require the Office of National Drug Control Policy Reauthorization Act to “develop, implement and make public, within 90 days of enactment, a national emerging threats response plan that is specific to methamphetamine.”

That plan, according to the press release, must be updated each year and include the following: “An assessment of the methamphetamine threat, including the current availability of, and demand for the drug, and evidence-based prevention and treatment programs, as well as law enforcement programs; short- and long-term goals, including those focused on supply and demand reduction, and on expanding the availability and effectiveness of treatment and prevention programs; performance measures pertaining to the plan’s goals; the level of funding needed to implement the plan; and an implementation strategy, goals, and objectives for a media campaign.”

Rep. Peters, a California Democrat, referred to his home district, which includes San Diego, in discussing his support for the new law.

“Once known as the meth capital of the United States, San Diego has a long history in working to combat methamphetamine production and addiction. Law enforcement officials still refer to our region as ‘ground zero’ for the nation’s meth problem, and a surge in the amount of the drug smuggled across the U.S.-Mexico border in recent years has caused overdose cases to skyrocket,” said Peters. “The new law will address this issue head-on by requiring the Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP) to develop, implement and make public a national plan to prevent methamphetamine addiction and overdoses from becoming a crisis. As meth-related deaths continue to rise with each passing year, we must recognize meth as an emerging threat nationwide.”

The post Biden Signs Bill To Take On Rising Meth Abuse appeared first on High Times.

Delaware House Shoots Down Recreational Legalization Bill

A majority of lawmakers in Delaware’s state House of Representatives voted in favor of a bill to legalize recreational cannabis, but that was still below the threshold necessary for the legislation to advance.

The Associated Press reported that “[m]embers of the Democrat-led chamber voted 23-14 in favor the legislation, but it required a three-fifths majority of 25 votes because it would impose a new tax,” adding that “No Republicans voted in favor of the bill, and four lawmakers, including two Democrats, chose not to vote.”

Despite being a solidly blue state, Delaware –– like its most famous native son, President Joe Biden –– has been slow to embrace legalization.

As reported by the AP, the sponsor of the bill that was defeated on Thursday, Democratic state House Rep. Ed Osienski, noted that “Delaware is the only state in the country with a Democratic governor and Democrat-controlled legislature that has not approved legalization.”

“We’re unique,” Oseinski said.

The state’s governor, John Carney, has long been a vocal opponent of legalizing cannabis.

“Look, I just don’t think it’s a good idea,” Carney said last year, arguing that marijuana could exacerbate the state’s opioid crisis.

“If you talk to the parents of some of these folks that have overdosed and passed away they don’t think it’s a good idea because they remember the trajectory of their own sons and daughters,” the governor said. “And I’m not suggesting that that’s always a gateway for all that, but if you talk to those Attack Addiction advocates they don’t think it’s a very good idea.”

“As I look at other states that have it, it just doesn’t seem to me to be a very positive thing from the strength of the community, of the economy in their states,” he added. “Is it the worst thing in the world? No, of course not.”

Osienski’s bill failed to attract support from his GOP colleagues, with one notable objection coming from Republican state House Rep. Mike Smith.

According to the Associated Press, Smith “was the lone GOP member of the Health and Human Development Committee to vote in January to release the bill for consideration by the full House,” and his vote against the bill on Thursday came after Democrats rejected a slew of amendments he had proposed, including one that would have added “felony convictions for violating Delaware’s tax code or Controlled Substance Act to the criteria the state could consider in deciding whether to issue someone a marijuana industry license.”

Smith, as quoted by the AP, blamed Democrats for the bill’s demise.

“I hope people remember this moment, because you killed the legalization of marijuana,” Smith said.

Osienski called Smith’s 11th-hour amendments “disingenuous.”

“I’ve been working with Republicans … and the first time I saw his amendments was today,” he said, as quoted by the AP.

For Oseinski, the setback is nothing new. Last summer, he saw his legalization bill pulled from the House’s agenda mere hours before a vote was scheduled.

Osienski broke it down at the time.

“Part of our effort has been to level the playing field for those most impacted by the failed War on Drugs. However, including our proposed social equity fund would make House Bill 150 a 3/4 majority bill, per the Delaware Constitution,” Osienski said then. “Simply put, we do not have the 31 votes necessary to pass the bill in its current state.”

“However, removing the fund—which would restore the original, attainable 3/5 majority—would create other concerns about our commitment to those communities. My charge at this stage is to find a compromise that all supporters can rally behind. When we reach that compromise, I will bring HB 150 forward for consideration. I am committed to continuing to work with all parties to find a solution that allows Delaware to become the next state to legalize adult recreational marijuana,” he added.

The post Delaware House Shoots Down Recreational Legalization Bill appeared first on High Times.

Delaware House Shoots Down Recreational Legalization Bill

A majority of lawmakers in Delaware’s state House of Representatives voted in favor of a bill to legalize recreational cannabis, but that was still below the threshold necessary for the legislation to advance.

The Associated Press reported that “[m]embers of the Democrat-led chamber voted 23-14 in favor the legislation, but it required a three-fifths majority of 25 votes because it would impose a new tax,” adding that “No Republicans voted in favor of the bill, and four lawmakers, including two Democrats, chose not to vote.”

Despite being a solidly blue state, Delaware –– like its most famous native son, President Joe Biden –– has been slow to embrace legalization.

As reported by the AP, the sponsor of the bill that was defeated on Thursday, Democratic state House Rep. Ed Osienski, noted that “Delaware is the only state in the country with a Democratic governor and Democrat-controlled legislature that has not approved legalization.”

“We’re unique,” Oseinski said.

The state’s governor, John Carney, has long been a vocal opponent of legalizing cannabis.

“Look, I just don’t think it’s a good idea,” Carney said last year, arguing that marijuana could exacerbate the state’s opioid crisis.

“If you talk to the parents of some of these folks that have overdosed and passed away they don’t think it’s a good idea because they remember the trajectory of their own sons and daughters,” the governor said. “And I’m not suggesting that that’s always a gateway for all that, but if you talk to those Attack Addiction advocates they don’t think it’s a very good idea.”

“As I look at other states that have it, it just doesn’t seem to me to be a very positive thing from the strength of the community, of the economy in their states,” he added. “Is it the worst thing in the world? No, of course not.”

Osienski’s bill failed to attract support from his GOP colleagues, with one notable objection coming from Republican state House Rep. Mike Smith.

According to the Associated Press, Smith “was the lone GOP member of the Health and Human Development Committee to vote in January to release the bill for consideration by the full House,” and his vote against the bill on Thursday came after Democrats rejected a slew of amendments he had proposed, including one that would have added “felony convictions for violating Delaware’s tax code or Controlled Substance Act to the criteria the state could consider in deciding whether to issue someone a marijuana industry license.”

Smith, as quoted by the AP, blamed Democrats for the bill’s demise.

“I hope people remember this moment, because you killed the legalization of marijuana,” Smith said.

Osienski called Smith’s 11th-hour amendments “disingenuous.”

“I’ve been working with Republicans … and the first time I saw his amendments was today,” he said, as quoted by the AP.

For Oseinski, the setback is nothing new. Last summer, he saw his legalization bill pulled from the House’s agenda mere hours before a vote was scheduled.

Osienski broke it down at the time.

“Part of our effort has been to level the playing field for those most impacted by the failed War on Drugs. However, including our proposed social equity fund would make House Bill 150 a 3/4 majority bill, per the Delaware Constitution,” Osienski said then. “Simply put, we do not have the 31 votes necessary to pass the bill in its current state.”

“However, removing the fund—which would restore the original, attainable 3/5 majority—would create other concerns about our commitment to those communities. My charge at this stage is to find a compromise that all supporters can rally behind. When we reach that compromise, I will bring HB 150 forward for consideration. I am committed to continuing to work with all parties to find a solution that allows Delaware to become the next state to legalize adult recreational marijuana,” he added.

The post Delaware House Shoots Down Recreational Legalization Bill appeared first on High Times.

Majority of Cannabis CFOs Think Biden Doesn’t Support Cannabis

Most financial leaders in cannabis don’t trust the Biden administration, new data suggests. On December 14, GreenGrowth CPAs announced the cannabis industry’s first 2021 Cannabis CFO Survey—a 22-page analysis containing business and market outlook data from over 75 cannabis industry CFOs, CEOs, founders, controllers and other financial roles in 20 markets across the United States. 

The report showed a lack in confidence about commitment on federal cannabis reform from President Joe Biden’s administration, and it provided some fascinating details of how people in financial roles in the cannabis industry differ in opinion from members of other industry sectors. 

Financial leaders were asked their perspective on the cannabis business environment, progress recovering from the COVID-19 pandemic and outlook on raising capital and assessing the potential impact of the Biden administration. “The answers were volunteered by financial leaders throughout the cannabis ecosystem,” GreenGrowth CPAs Chief Marketing Officer Kristofer Lenz told High Times. “We sent emails to our internal distribution list ([over 40,000] mix of clients, prospects and folks who signed up for our newsletter), posted on social media and conducted personal outreach to industry partners who also shared within their networks.”

Notably, over 62 percent of respondents doubt support from the Biden administration. Specifically, President Biden doesn’t have a great track record on cannabis like most other members of the Silent Generation. White House Press Secretary Jen Psaki reaffirmed last July that President Joe Biden opposes cannabis legalization—putting him at odds with top Democrats such as Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer and Senator Cory Booker.

GreenGrowth CPAs provided four highlights from the 2021 Cannabis CFO Survey:

  • 70.2 percent of cannabis operators feel the cannabis business environment is improving (but only 28 percent of cultivators agree)
  • 18.2 percent of operators are stronger financially today than before the COVID-19 pandemic
  • 79.2 percent of operators are planning to raise capital, 19.5 percent through an IPO/RTO go-public transaction
  • 62.4 percent don’t think the Biden Administration supports cannabis, and 41.6 percent think we are 5+ years away from federal legalization

One problem is the difference in opinion between how cannabis operators in general feel about the health of the cannabis business environment compared to cultivators in particular. While over 70 percent of operators believe the cannabis business environment is improving, just 28 percent of cultivators agree. 

“In the last six months, wholesale prices have absolutely plummeted due to oversupply, lack of demand, a lot of other issues, and you can really see in the data, the impact it’s having,” Lenz explained. “There is the East and West divide. Essentially we’re going through this sort of peak and valley evolution in the market. When new markets come online, there’s a lot of pent-up demand, a lot of licenses.”

Lenz explained the difference between newer and older state markets. “So there’s Illinois, Massachusetts, in these sort of newer markets, where the wholesale price is high, demand is really high, and this vision of cannabis capitalism—as people are imagining it—is really thriving,” he said. “But in more states that are older, we’re seeing a valley form. It’s actually happening in Colorado, California, especially where the more and more cultivators come online, the more sophisticated those cultivation opportunities are, the more flower is hitting the market, but the demand is not necessarily catching up.”

This could be perhaps due to the “collapse” of the wholesale value of cannabis crops in California, partly due to sky-high taxes, fees and light-deprivation weed. Growers in the Emerald Triangle in Humboldt, Mendocino and Trinity Counties, for instance, are calling this an “extinction event.”

The insights in the 2021 Cannabis CFO Survey were self-reported a blend of multi-state operators, retailers, cultivators and ancillary service providers throughout the cannabis industry. The report is free for download at the GreenGrowth CPAs website.

The report shows the amount of distrust with the priorities of the Biden administration among financial leaders in the industry. Keep in mind, however, that no president can directly remove cannabis from control under the Controlled Substances Act, but he could, however, order executive agencies to consider either altering the classification of cannabis or change their enforcement approach.

The post Majority of Cannabis CFOs Think Biden Doesn’t Support Cannabis appeared first on High Times.

Weldon Project Pens Letter Calling for Release Of Cannabis Prisoners

A recent letter from the advocacy group The Weldon Project was also signed by more than 150 artists, athletes, producers, lawmakers, policy experts, reform advocates and leaders in business, law enforcement and academia. The letter urges the president to use his authority “to grant  a  full, complete, and unconditional  pardon to all  persons  subject  to federal  criminal  or civil  enforcement  on the basis  of non-violent  marijuana  offenses.”

The Weldon Project is named after its president and co-founder, Weldon Angelos, who was building a promising music career when he was sentenced to 55 years in federal prison in 2003 for selling less than $1,000 worth of marijuana. Angelos was eventually released in 2016 after spending 13 years behind bars, going on to found the Weldon Project to advocate for change and provide support and financial aid to those serving prison sentences for cannabis-related offenses. 

In a press release about the letter, Angelos called on the president to fulfill campaign promises to support cannabis reform efforts.

“Candidate Biden promised to take action and use the pardon power of the presidency to release those serving prison time for marijuana and pardon their felony convictions,” said Angelos. “At a time when dispensaries are as prevalent as liquor stores in some states, it is time for President Biden to now make good on that promise.”

Angelos was joined by celebrities including Drake, Killer Mike, Deion Sanders, Al Harrington and Kevin Garnett, who signed the letter calling for an end to the harm caused by federal cannabis prohibition.

“The harms of incarceration are obvious, but the pains of federal marijuana convictions transcend prison walls, making it more difficult for someone to get a job, access affordable housing and receive an education,” the letter reads. “A conviction can forever limit an individual’s constitutional rights and can put the American dream further out of reach for an entire family. Enough is enough. No one should be locked up in federal prison for marijuana. No one should continue to bear the scarlet letter of a federal conviction for marijuana offenses.”

Cannabis Industry Supports Clemency

The letter went on to note that three-quarters of American states have replaced cannabis prohibition with safe, regulated access to legal marijuana for either medical or recreational use, or both. Kyle Kazan, the CEO of California vertically integrated cannabis producer Glass House Brands, said that his company “fully supports The Weldon Project’s efforts to redress the harm done by the misguided War on Drugs” and urged others in the industry to do the same.

“Legal companies can no longer stand idly by and profit off of cannabis while individuals like Weldon Angelos suffer from the financial and social repercussions of a prison sentence for selling or using the same substance,” Kazan said.

Angelos’ letter urges Biden to exercise his authority under the U.S. Constitution to grant clemency for federal criminal convictions. The letter also notes that a full pardon for those convicted of nonviolent marijuana offenses is consistent with the actions of previous presidents from both political parties.

“In 1974, President Ford established a program of conditional clemency for Selective Service Act violators. In 1977, President Carter issued a categorical pardon to all Selective Service Act violators, closing the book on a costly and painful war,” the letter reads. 

“President Biden has the power to do the same for the federal war on marijuana. Through his act of constitutional grace, a general clemency will send a clear and powerful message that our country is truly taking a new course on criminal justice policy and practice.”

Hip-Hop Artists Join the Cause

Among those signing the letter were music industry leaders including Drake, Meek Mill, Lil Baby, Killer Mike and dozens of hip-hop artists who joined the effort in support of rapper and friend Ralo, who is currently facing up to eight years in prison for a nonviolent cannabis offense. In a statement, Ralo highlighted the inconsistency in enforcement of federal cannabis prohibition and echoed the letter’s call for clemency.

“I appreciate my friends and peers in the hip-hop community, especially Drake, supporting my clemency because it’s just not right that corporations are allowed to violate federal law and become millionaires while people like myself go to prison for years,” Ralo said. “This is hypocrisy. I hope that Joe Biden honors his campaign promise and grants us clemency without delay, so I can return to my family and community.”

The post Weldon Project Pens Letter Calling for Release Of Cannabis Prisoners appeared first on High Times.

Here is everything wrong with Biden’s “forced rehab” plan for drug reform

Although the latest talks regarding cannabis legislation have been slightly more hopeful, it seems pretty obvious that President Joe Biden isn’t a diehard supporter of legalizing the plant entirely.

Back in the 1980s, Biden was actually very committed to the war on drugs, and cannabis in particular, helping draft numerous pieces of legislation that would keep low-level, non-violent drug offenders incarcerated for years to come. As of 2010, his opinions hadn’t changed much and he can be quoted saying, “There’s a difference between sending someone to jail for a few ounces [of marijuana] and legalizing. The punishment should fit the crime. But I think legalization is a mistake. I still believe [marijuana] is a gateway drug.”

Fast forward another decade and Joe Biden is the 46th president of the United States, during a time when cannabis legalization is an incredibly polarizing topic on many fronts: economic, social, and health institutions all have a major stake in the industry. At the very least it seems Biden has accepted that cannabis legalization is inevitable, and even mentioned that he thinks “it is at the point where it has to be, basically, legalized.”

However, he maintains his stance in favor of decriminalization over full legalization. But as we already know from watching the many states that have tried it already, decriminalization is a completely pointless step in between prohibition and legalization that allows for too much “interpretation” of the law.

For example, in a decriminalized state, a police officer can take your cannabis, fine you, and send you to court where your case will end up getting thrown out if it meets the criteria of a legal decriminalized amount. So, you’re out the money you spent on flower that remains confiscated, the city doesn’t get any money from your fines because they’re tossed out in court, and the entire ordeal is a mega waste of time for everyone involved.

Regardless, this is what Biden supports. And not only does put him at odds with most US citizens who have been wanting cannabis legalization for years, but it pits him against the majority of his own political party. This year, with Democrats in control of the Senate, leadership just promised to pursue comprehensive cannabis reform legislation within the first term year. To make good on this promise, Joe Biden proposed a plan for mandatory rehabilitation instead of jail/prison time for non-violent drug offenders. The idea might sound good on paper, but it is 100% misguided, and let me tell you why.

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The mandatory rehab proposition

Cannabis has been illegal in the US for the better part of the last century, and as a result, thousands of people have been unjustly incarcerated for completely non-violent offences, and it continues to this day. This puts even more weight on the importance of passing comprehensive cannabis reform legislation.

New laws couldn’t come soon enough, but with any kind of significant legal changes in a country with millions of people, there will undoubtedly be some kinks to work out in the beginning. Many details go into the making of a successful cannabis market – such as social equity, interstate commerce, at-home cultivation, racial justice, business zoning and so forth.

Another important issue is legislating the newly legal product itself. It’s “legal”, yes, but for who? And what amounts are legal? And who is allowed to sell it, and how much? Where can it be grown and where can products be manufactured? The list goes on. Of utmost importance though, is how to deal with people who don’t follow the established guidelines.

According to President Biden, “nobody convicted of a drug crime should go to prison, they should go to mandatory rehabilitation,” he emphasized at a campaign event in Kenosha, Wisconsin late last year. “Instead of building more prisons… we [should] build rehabilitation centers.”

On the surface, it appears like a logical option instead of sending someone to prison. But it begs the question, if court-ordered rehab is mandatory, what happens if the person doesn’t complete the program? Or what if they don’t show up at all? Most likely, they will go to prison. So while it seems like a reasonable way for people to possibly avoid jail, it’s likely that a large number of people will still end up serving time, often based on arbitrary and unrealistic standards that patients are required to meet before they can “graduate” from their treatment programs.

As a matter of fact, a report published in 2017 by the group Physicians for Human Rights found that drug courts and rehab programs “regularly set participants up for failure.” The report went on to say that “Drug courts in the United States routinely fail to provide adequate, medically-sound treatment for substance use disorders, with treatment plans that are at times designed and facilitated by individuals with little to no medical training… Few communities have adequate treatment facilities, insurance plans often won’t finance effective treatment programs, and the criminal justice objectives of drug courts often overrule the medical needs of the patient in ways that threaten the rights and health of participants.”

Skewed data and shady practices at rehabs nationwide

While some drug court advocates claim the programs are a success, the actual data presented is a bit warped – starting with the fact that many of them are funded by privately-run, for-profit facilities that obviously have a vested interest in getting more patients, and subsequently, more funding. Additionally, many of the studies are basing the effectiveness of rehab programs by comparing them to prisons. So by those standards, it’s no surprise that people in rehab facilities have slightly better outcomes than those locked away in prison.

It’s also not unheard of for drug court judges to engage in the same discriminatory practices we see in our regular justice system. Knowing the programs will be evaluated based on a recovery-to-recidivism rate, they often choose enrollees that they believe will be most likely to complete the program successfully; completely glossing over the marginalized groups of people who may actually benefit most from a legitimate treatment program.

And that leads us to another issue with rehab facilities, are they legit? So many programs have been faced lawsuits for unethical, unsafe practices, and outright abuse.  Take the notorious treatment program from the 1980s known as Straight, Inc. They demonized casual cannabis use and urge parents to send children who have tried it to their facilities.

Upon investigation, it was revealed that minors in their program were “routinely subjected to unusual punishment, infliction of pain, humiliation, intimidation, ridicule, coercion, threats, mental abuse…and interference with daily living functions such as eating, sleeping and toileting.” Needless to say, the facilities were all eventually shut down, but many more exist and continue to abuse their patients, causing more problems and lifelong issues than they will ever fix.

The founders of Straight, Inc., Mel and Betty Sembler, took the vast fortune they amassed off the pain of struggling youth to start their own organization – The Drug Free America Foundation. Using their foundation, they funded numerous anti-cannabis campaigns and currently continue to remain major fundraisers for the republican party. Overall, Straight, Inc. is the perfect example of how a rehab facility (or the owners) can get rich for doing absolutely nothing, then use that money in a completely self-serving way. For them, keeping cannabis illegal wasn’t about helping adolescents or bettering the community, it was about lining their pockets and getting as wealthy as possible.

Overcrowding at already congested facilities

As of now, Biden administration plans for forced rehabilitation aren’t concrete yet, but it’s already a common practice in many states where cannabis is still illegal, mainly in the Southern US. There is an obvious problem with forcing people into rehab when they don’t need it: that leaves less room for the people who actually do.

This country is already in the grips of a national opioid crisis, and frighteningly, the number of overdose-related deaths has increased since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic. According to research published this month by the American Medical Association, “In addition to the ongoing challenges presented by the COVID-19 global pandemic, the nation’s opioid epidemic has grown into a much more complicated and deadly drug overdose epidemic … More than 40 states have reported increases in opioid-related mortality as well as ongoing concerns for those with a mental illness or substance use disorder.”

2020 saw over 81,000 overdoes deaths, compared to just under 71,000 the previous year. People are seeking help and trying to get placed into appropriate rehab facilities, but there just isn’t room for many of them. In most states, rehab wait lists are up 18 months long with hundreds, if not thousands, of people desperately waiting for treatment. Statistics found the most people drop off the list after about 2 weeks.

The most recent data available from the Department of Health and Human Services, states that more than 50% of all cannabis users in treatment were sent there by the courts or the criminal justice system. Less than 20% checked in voluntarily.

Final thoughts

According to numerous studies over the last decade gauging the addictive qualities of various substances, cannabis rates lower than alcohol, tobacco, and even caffeine. That’s not to say you can’t become addicted to cannabis, because you totally can (and before you bite my head off, I’ve met people who would spend their rent and grocery money on pot, so that signifies a problem).

For some people, therapy and rehab could be beneficial. But forcing someone with no addiction problems to choose between jail and rehab is completely illogical and not at all in line with “comprehensive” drug reform; and for Biden to even consider this as a possibility for cannabis users, is wrong as can be.

The post Here is everything wrong with Biden’s “forced rehab” plan for drug reform appeared first on CBD Testers.

Thursday March 11, 2021 Headlines | Marijuana Today Daily News

Marijuana Today Daily Headlines
Thursday, March 11, 2021 | Curated by host Shea Gunther

// Mexico’s Chamber Of Deputies Approves Revised Marijuana Legalization Bill (Marijuana Moment)

// Noem’s medical marijuana plan scuttled by Senate (Sioux City Journal)

// Mississippi House Kills Alternate Medical Marijuana Proposal But Senate Makes Late Attempt To Revive It (Marijuana Moment)


These headlines are brought to you by Cova Software, the number one dispensary point-of-sale system in North America! Swing over today to see why two thirds of all Canadian cannabis stores run on Cova software, which is also the fastest growing dispensary software in the U.S!


// Garland’s confirmation as AG could change Feds’ marijuana views (Marijuana Business Daily)

// Aurora Cannabis Still Wants More Money Files To Offer $1 Billion In Securities (Green Market Report)

// Acreage Holdings Reports $286 Million Net Loss in 2020 (Green Market Report)

// The Green Organic Dutchman Reports $183 Million Net Loss For 2020 (Green Market Report)

// Detroit overwhelmed by applicants for recreational marijuana shop licenses (Detroit News)

// As Green Thumb opens its first California cannabis store CEO says ‘This is a long-term game’ (CNBC)

// Tennessee Republican wants to permanently block recreational marijuana through state constitution (Tennessean)

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