Wednesday, January 22, 2020 Headlines | Marijuana Today Daily News

Marijuana Today Daily Headlines
Wednesday, January 22, 2020 | Curated by host Shea Gunther

// Rumors Are That MedMen Is Unable To Pay Vendors (Green Market Report)

// New Mexico Governor Says It’s ‘High Time’ To Legalize Marijuana (Marijuana Moment)

// Arizona climate blamed for ‘off the charts’ THC failure in first hemp crops (Marijuana Business Daily)


These headlines are brought to you by Curaleaf, one of the leading vertically-integrated cannabis operators in the U.S. With legal medical marijuana dispensaries, cultivation sites, and processing facilities all over the United States, Curaleaf has served more than 165,000 medical cannabis patients and looks forward to helping many more long into the future. Swing over to Curaleaf.com to learn more about this very cool company!


// New York Governor Includes Marijuana Legalization In New Budget Plan (Marijuana Moment)

// Colorado Tries to Beckon Tourists With Buy-and-Try Pot Lounges (Bloomberg Government)

// 1 in 13 Oklahoma Adults Are Now Using Medical Marijuana Legally (Merry Jane)

// New Zealand to overturn cannabis vaporizer ban, clearing the way for imports (Marijuana Business Daily)

// Free Weed: Sicily Is No Longer Charging Patients for Medical Cannabis (Merry Jane)

// Pete Buttigieg wants to end the war on weed- but not in South Bend (Leafly)

// Chart: Florida sales of smokable marijuana topped 22,000 pounds in less than six months (Marijuana Business Daily)


Check out our other projects:
Marijuana Today— Our flagship title, a weekly podcast examining the world of marijuana business and activism with some of the smartest people in the industry and movement.
Marijuana Media Connect— A service that connects industry insiders in the legal marijuana industry with journalists, bloggers, and writers in need of expert sources for their stories.

Love these headlines? Love our podcast? Support our work with a financial contribution and become a patron.

Photo: Chris Goldberg/Flickr

Friday, April 10, 2020 Headlines | Marijuana Today Daily News

Marijuana Today Daily Headlines
Friday, April 10, 2020 | Curated by host Shea Gunther

// Budtenders Are Being Put At Risk For COVID-19 (Green Entrepreneur)

// Cannabis producers in Australia avoid ‘nonessential’ designation (Marijuana Business Daily)

// Cory Booker Says Medical Marijuana Access Should Be Prioritized Amid Coronavirus (Marijuana Moment)


These headlines are brought to you by Curaleaf, one of the leading vertically-integrated cannabis operators in the U.S. With legal medical marijuana dispensaries, cultivation sites, and processing facilities all over the United States, Curaleaf has served more than 165,000 medical cannabis patients and looks forward to helping many more long into the future. Swing over to Curaleaf.com to learn more about this very cool company!


// Michigan Marijuana Market ‘Maturing Rapidly,’ But Faces Barriers To Growth, State Report Finds (Marijuana Moment)

// Oregon sets cannabis sales mark with $84.5 million in March (Marijuana Business Daily)

// New Zealand eases prescription requirement for cannabis-based medicine Sativex (Marijuana Business Daily)

// Italian medical cannabis sales grew 50% in 2019, and supply remains stable despite coronavirus (Marijuana Business Daily)

// BDS Analytical Data Details Surging Sales in Two East Coast Cannabis Markets (New Cannabis Ventures)

// BDS Analytics Data Shows Strong Cannabis Sales Growth in Western States During February (New Cannabis Ventures)

// How to disinfect cannabis packaging during the coronavirus pandemic (Leafly)


Check out our other projects:Marijuana Today— Our flagship title, a weekly podcast examining the world of marijuana business and activism with some of the smartest people in the industry and movement. • Marijuana Media Connect— A service that connects industry insiders in the legal marijuana industry with journalists, bloggers, and writers in need of expert sources for their stories.

Love these headlines? Love our podcast? Support our work with a financial contribution and become a patron.

Photo: Dank Depot/Flickr

Friday, April 10, 2020 Headlines | Marijuana Today Daily News

Marijuana Today Daily Headlines
Friday, April 10, 2020 | Curated by host Shea Gunther

// Budtenders Are Being Put At Risk For COVID-19 (Green Entrepreneur)

// Cannabis producers in Australia avoid ‘nonessential’ designation (Marijuana Business Daily)

// Cory Booker Says Medical Marijuana Access Should Be Prioritized Amid Coronavirus (Marijuana Moment)


These headlines are brought to you by Curaleaf, one of the leading vertically-integrated cannabis operators in the U.S. With legal medical marijuana dispensaries, cultivation sites, and processing facilities all over the United States, Curaleaf has served more than 165,000 medical cannabis patients and looks forward to helping many more long into the future. Swing over to Curaleaf.com to learn more about this very cool company!


// Michigan Marijuana Market ‘Maturing Rapidly,’ But Faces Barriers To Growth, State Report Finds (Marijuana Moment)

// Oregon sets cannabis sales mark with $84.5 million in March (Marijuana Business Daily)

// New Zealand eases prescription requirement for cannabis-based medicine Sativex (Marijuana Business Daily)

// Italian medical cannabis sales grew 50% in 2019, and supply remains stable despite coronavirus (Marijuana Business Daily)

// BDS Analytical Data Details Surging Sales in Two East Coast Cannabis Markets (New Cannabis Ventures)

// BDS Analytics Data Shows Strong Cannabis Sales Growth in Western States During February (New Cannabis Ventures)

// How to disinfect cannabis packaging during the coronavirus pandemic (Leafly)


Check out our other projects:Marijuana Today— Our flagship title, a weekly podcast examining the world of marijuana business and activism with some of the smartest people in the industry and movement. • Marijuana Media Connect— A service that connects industry insiders in the legal marijuana industry with journalists, bloggers, and writers in need of expert sources for their stories.

Love these headlines? Love our podcast? Support our work with a financial contribution and become a patron.

Photo: Dank Depot/Flickr

Two New Cannabinoids: THCP and CBDP

An Italian team of researchers, led by Professor Giuseppe Cannazza, from the University of Modena and Reggio Emilia (UniMore), have announced the discovery of a new cannabinoid, shown in lab results to be more than 30 times as potent as THC. Newly named tetrahydrocannabiforol, Δ9-THCP, it was isolated alongside a corresponding cannabidiol, CBD, homolog with […]

The post Two New Cannabinoids: THCP and CBDP appeared first on Latest Cannabis News Today – Headlines, Videos & Stocks.

Medical Marijuana Now Available for Free for Patients in Sicily

Sicilian cannabis patients may be celebrating after news dropped yesterday that the region’s medical marijuana supplies would be free to certain qualified program participants. Sicily’s top health administrator Ruggero Razza signed a decree that patients with chronic or neuropathic pain, cerebral palsy, or multiple sclerosis will qualify for the government’s subsidized marijuana.

In so doing, Sicily joins national governments in the EU like Ireland and the Czech Republic who have made the decision to largely pay for some of its population’s cannabis treatments.

According to the Italian system, patients must obtain a prescription for cannabis from a doctor. With that script, they are able to buy cannabis from a licensed pharmacist, which gets its supply from either the Italian ministry of defense or from a list of certified importers. 

At the moment, most of Italy’s medical cannabis supplies come from the Netherlands, via the Dutch Office of Medical Cannabis, though the country’s Stabilimento Chimico Farmaceutico di Firenze, an agency within the Department of Defense, is also allowed to produce medicinal cannabis supply. Medical marijuana has been legal in the country since 2013. 

Canadian cannabis company Aurora is also one of Italy’s medical suppliers. It was authorized in June to import 400 kilograms into the country over the next two years — though part of that contract was canceled in November. Aurora is a popular choice among EU governments. The brand also has a contract with the government of Luxembourg and supplies one of only three authorized products that will be permitted in Ireland’s medical cannabis system, set to become operational within the next few months. 

Sicilian subsidies are not the only recent news in Italy’s quest to widen cannabis access. Last month, the country’s highest court decided that citizens should be able to grow cannabis in their home, and that personal cultivation was not relevant to the criminal persecution of cannabis-related crimes. The court published a December 19 opinion stating that, “at home, small-scale cultivation activities are to be considered excluded from the application of the penal code.” 

In so doing, the country joins only a handful of peers that have regulated home cultivation for recreational uses, such as Uruguay. 

The court’s home cultivation decision was motivated by cases like that of a Torre Annunziata man who was sentenced to a year of incarceration and 3,000 euros when he was discovered growing a pair of cannabis plants. 

CBD in Italy

CBD products — called “cannabis light” locally — are widely available in Italian stores and bring in around 40 million euro a year. Hemp grows well in the Italian climate, even helping to renew soil that has been exhausted by exhaustive wheat cultivation. 

But hemp-based products have not escaped controversy, and have come under fire from the country’s conservative political parties. Raids on cannabis light stores last summer resulted in one business owner chaining himself to the doors of his store after it was raided by the police. In response, Italy’s parliament voted to legalize the hemp-based products, but the lawmakers were overruled by the Senate, which denied the plan in December. 

As legal battles continue, the country’s scientists have been working to improve our understanding of the drug. Earlier this year, Italian researchers announced the discovery of two new cannabinoids, which they dubbed CBDP and THCP.

The post Medical Marijuana Now Available for Free for Patients in Sicily appeared first on High Times.

Wednesday, January 22, 2020 Headlines | Marijuana Today Daily News

Marijuana Today Daily Headlines
Wednesday, January 22, 2020 | Curated by host Shea Gunther

// Rumors Are That MedMen Is Unable To Pay Vendors (Green Market Report)

// New Mexico Governor Says It’s ‘High Time’ To Legalize Marijuana (Marijuana Moment)

// Arizona climate blamed for ‘off the charts’ THC failure in first hemp crops (Marijuana Business Daily)


These headlines are brought to you by Curaleaf, one of the leading vertically-integrated cannabis operators in the U.S. With legal medical marijuana dispensaries, cultivation sites, and processing facilities all over the United States, Curaleaf has served more than 165,000 medical cannabis patients and looks forward to helping many more long into the future. Swing over to Curaleaf.com to learn more about this very cool company!


// New York Governor Includes Marijuana Legalization In New Budget Plan (Marijuana Moment)

// Colorado Tries to Beckon Tourists With Buy-and-Try Pot Lounges (Bloomberg Government)

// 1 in 13 Oklahoma Adults Are Now Using Medical Marijuana Legally (Merry Jane)

// New Zealand to overturn cannabis vaporizer ban, clearing the way for imports (Marijuana Business Daily)

// Free Weed: Sicily Is No Longer Charging Patients for Medical Cannabis (Merry Jane)

// Pete Buttigieg wants to end the war on weed- but not in South Bend (Leafly)

// Chart: Florida sales of smokable marijuana topped 22,000 pounds in less than six months (Marijuana Business Daily)


Check out our other projects:
Marijuana Today— Our flagship title, a weekly podcast examining the world of marijuana business and activism with some of the smartest people in the industry and movement.
Marijuana Media Connect— A service that connects industry insiders in the legal marijuana industry with journalists, bloggers, and writers in need of expert sources for their stories.

Love these headlines? Love our podcast? Support our work with a financial contribution and become a patron.

Photo: Chris Goldberg/Flickr

Cannabis’s Unlikely Friend in the Fight for Reform: The Courts

The cannabis scene in Italy is changing quickly. As many as 1,000 shops selling low-THC, high-CBD products have appeared in major cities over the past few years, but cannabis is still definitely illegal: While possession is decriminalized and is punishable by a fine and some paperwork, sales can result in a six-year prison term and a 75,000 euro fine.

But let’s say you want to grow a little pot at home. That’s apparently now OK, though you might not find permission outlined in any law on the books. Permission to cultivate was instead granted recently by the country’s Supreme Court, which ruled on Dec. 19 that “small amounts grown domestically for the exclusive use of the grower” are perfectly acceptable.

As Reuters reported, the ruling apparently went unnoticed for more than a week before it touched off some intense (and maybe a bit histrionic) debate among lawmakers on Friday. (The left is good with it, the right hates it, the middle is a little worried about going too fast!) But what makes the ruling the hook for a trend piece is the fact that it’s the latest in a recent string of drug-policy reform victories won via the courts — which is maybe how it always should have been.

Last year, it was Mexico’s Supreme Court that ruled that the country’s ban on recreational cannabis was unconstitutional, violating the very document upon which the state is based. In that instance, it was the fifth such ruling on cannabis, which in Mexico means a legal precedent is created upon which lawmakers are compelled to act. In the cannabis case, when those lawmakers didn’t act, choosing instead to dither and stall, it was the same Supreme Court that ordered lawmakers to act and amend national law to explicitly allow adults to possess cannabis without fear of prosecution.

How or why did the courts do this? In Mexico, the courts
were ruling on a series of legal challenges brought by citizens and argued by
lawyers. This is how the law is supposed to work — and this is how it’s worked,
to some degree, in the United States, though without any epochal, Brown vs.
Board of Education
-worthy revolutions on the cannabis question.

Judges are given some limited discretion as to how to interpret the law, but have significant leeway via an ambiguous but very useful clause: “in the interest of justice,” a sort of catch-all, “f*ck it, we’re out” emergency exit that allows either a prosecutor or a judge to end a prosecution. But even if a conviction in a cannabis case was won, a judge still had leeway to punish — or not punish — the offender accordingly. It was only after the imposition of mandatory minimums that courtrooms became halls of horrors for cannabis defendants.

With a handful of exceptions, in the United States, legalization and medical marijuana access have been won with the popular vote, with ballot initiatives. It was this way because certain lawmakers among us decided that demonizing and prohibiting (certain) drugs and disenfranchising and imprisoning their users was an effective technique to grab and hold onto power. And when the laws weren’t punitive enough, or when judges were too lenient, lawmakers took away the courts’ discretion with mandatory minimums, baking the punishment into the statute outlining the crime. There are many examples of justices who ruled against what a reasonable person might view as the just cause because doing so would violate a law they nonetheless deplored.

However, at least recently, what the courts have done is interpret voter or legislator-initiated laws to mean that citizens are generally allowed more cannabis access than law enforcement or regulators allowed. In Colorado, the state Supreme Court ruled that drug-sniffing dogs can’t be deployed until there’s suspicion of a crime — a dog’s mere alert is not enough.

And a federal appeals court ruled that a case challenging cannabis’s position in the Controlled Substances Act can proceed — a procedural victory, but validating nonetheless. Many strict rules imposed on Florida medical marijuana patients and businesses by the state legislature or state regulators, including a ban on smoked cannabis, have been tossed out by the courts. Dabs and other cannabis concentrates were made explicitly legal by that state’s Supreme Court.

What’s going on here? Is the bench stuffed with pot-loving
freaks? Unlikely — just as unlikely as a world in which judges are bending to
the will of the people.

In many jurisdictions in the United States, judges are political appointees. Where they’re not, they’re elected, but in either case, it’s exceedingly difficult to remove a judge once they’re seated. You could make the argument that judges are inclined to rule towards cannabis reform because that’s what the people want, but a judge legislating from the bench might find themselves the target of a recall effort or ethics complaint — and no amount of challenges have managed to undo federal prohibition, which remains Congress’s will and thus the law of the land.

At the same time, when the issue has arisen, it’s the courts that interpret the will of the voters and the will of the people. If voters in Florida want legal medical marijuana, they probably mean they also want to smoke it, because that’s what people do. If medical cannabis is legal in Arizona, and the voter initiative doesn’t say “but not concentrates,” it means medical cannabis concentrates are legal. In this way, the courts aren’t so much a guiding light but a helping hand — and that’s more than can be said for some lawmakers.

TELL US, how do
you think cannabis should be legalized?

The post Cannabis’s Unlikely Friend in the Fight for Reform: The Courts appeared first on Cannabis Now.

Feral Hogs Partly Consume Almost $20k Worth of Cocaine in Italy

Feral hogs sniffed out a stash of cocaine that had been buried in an Italian forest by drug dealers earlier this year, according to police who had wiretapped the gang in connection with a murder investigation. The coke, nearly $20,000 worth, was at least partly consumed by wild boar as they dug up the drug and spread across the floor of a Tuscan forest.

Italian police learned of the cocaine-swiping swine during the investigation of the May murder of a 21-year-old Albanian who is suspected of being a drug dealer. After setting up a wiretap to monitor the phones of the gang, made up of one Italian and three Albanians, in connection with the murder, police heard them complaining about the incident.

The gang had allegedly been selling about two kilos of cocaine per month in the cities of Siena and Arezzo in Tuscany from September 2018 until March 2019. They were selling high-quality coke for about $95 per gram in bars and night clubs in the two cities, attempting to conceal their actions by using words as ‘aperitivo,’ ‘prosecco,’ ‘vino,’ and ‘caffè,’ as part of a code that was quickly cracked by police.

The drug dealers had been storing their cocaine in jars before burying it in the Valdichiana Valley. But that wasn’t enough to dissuade the greedy grunters. It isn’t known how many bingeing boar blew through the blow or what became of them.

The four members of the drug gang were arrested following the investigation and the wiretapped phone call. Two have been sent to prison, while the remaining two have been placed under house arrest.

Wild Boar Wreaking Havoc

Coke dealers aren’t the only ones fed up with feral hogs roaming the Italian countryside. Earlier this month, a group of farmers held a protest in Rome calling on government officials to do something about the problem. Coldiretti Ettore Prandini, the president of an Italian farming association, said that the country’s population of wild boar is estimated to be about two million. The wild pigs cause incredible damage to farmlands and wild habitats, and boar on roadways have led to car collisions with fatal consequences.

“It is no longer just a question of compensation but a matter of personal safety and it must be resolved,” Prandini said.

“Ministries and leaders of regions and municipalities must act in a concerted manner to draw up an extraordinary plan without administrative obstacles, otherwise the problem is destined to get worse,” he added.

The post Feral Hogs Partly Consume Almost $20k Worth of Cocaine in Italy appeared first on High Times.