First Ever Marketplace Exclusively For Delta 8 THC Products

Introducing a first-of-its-kind marketplace for all things delta 8 THC, Direct Delta 8. Direct Delta 8 will serve as the premier online retailer for a growing array of high-quality brands and products.

Why now, why delta 8? The founders of Direct Delta 8 saw a need for a safe, reliable, and enjoyable shopping experience for consumers looking for products. Delta 8 is federally legal thanks to the 2018 Farm Bill.Advertisement

According to the bill, also known as the Agricultural Improvement Act of 2018, “All derivatives, isomers, and cannabinoids in hemp are legal provided that the final products contain less than 0.3% delta 9 THC.”

To learn more about Delta 8 and get deals on flower and other products, subscribe to the Delta 8 Weekly Newsletter


So, not only can consumers legally reap the benefits of delta 8, but they can also rest assured that they’re only getting the highest quality products. Direct Delta 8 is beginning its venture with industry leading brands such as 3Chi, Delta Effex, Skyhio, Urb Finest Flowers, and CannaAid. Users can enjoy vape cartridges that conveniently fit onto a variety of devices, or, they can choose from delta 8 edibles or tinctures.

Like CBD and cannabis itself, delta 8 as a natural therapeutic is not a new concept. Research from various sources, including the National Cancer Institute, has shown delta 8 to have positive effects. If you’re wondering how delta 8 compares to CBD and THC, it can be described as offering a calming body feeling.

While CBD offers no psychoactive effects at all, delta 8’s effects are milder than THC. Therefore, delta 8 may offer promising benefits for individuals who haven’t found relief with CBD but aren’t able to safely or legally access THC. Of course, it’s important for anyone interested in a new remedy to first consult their healthcare provider.


About Direct Delta 8:
Direct Delta 8 was founded in 2020 by a team of individuals passionate about cannabis and its derivatives. Not only does Direct Delta 8 strive to provide the highest quality products and the best customer experience, but it also wants to help people learn more about delta 8 and it’s exciting potential.

SOURCE: PR NEWSWIRE

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California’s New Banking Bill Does Little To Help The Cannabis Industry

Last week, California Governor Gavin Newsom (D) signed a handful of cannabis-related bills into law. Among the biggest changes are updates to the state’s banking laws, and while overall positive, the potential of AB 1525 is severely limited.

As anyone in the industry already knows, cannabis professionals have long struggled to gain access to banking and other financial services for their businesses. AB (Assembly Bill) 1525, signed last Tuesday by Gov. Newsom, removes any penalties previously imposed on banks for working with legal cannabis companies.

In his signing statement on the banking bill, Newsom directed state cannabis regulators to establish rules meant to protect the privacy of marijuana businesses that seek financial services, urging that data be kept confidential and is used only “for the provision of financial services to support licensees.”

“This bill has the potential to increase the provisions of financial services to the legal cannabis industry,” Newsom wrote in a signing statement, “and for that reason, I support it.”

To learn more about the cannabis industry, subscribe to the Medical Cannabis Weekly Newsletter


Very Little Help

Newsom isn’t not wrong, this bill definitely has that potential, but it remains only that until cannabis becomes legal at the federal level. Regardless of state laws, banks, which are federal entities, have been hesitant to work with cannabis clients because the plant’s Schedule 1 status.

For reference, a Schedule 1 narcotic is categorized that way because there is a “high risk of abuse and no recognized medical value.” Despite the decades of research in other countries or the fact that medical cannabis is accepted in 33 states already. It’s also worth mentioning Cocaine, which has some anesthetic properties but is known for its high propensity for abuse, is categorized as Schedule II. Alcohol and tobacco aren’t scheduled at all. Yes, it’s the ultimate hypocrisy.

But regardless of our opinions on the subject, the takeaway here is that, with cannabis being a Schedule 1 narcotic, exchanging money for a cannabis business put banks at risk of getting charged with federal money laundering.  

“Until cannabis itself is taken off the dangerous substances list, and the DEA is no longer willing to seek forfeitures for anybody dealing with this substance, the majority of banks are still going to stay away” says Chris Garcia, buyer for Berkeley dispensary Hi Fidelity.  

The Cole Memorandum

In 2013, the Cole Memorandum was issued U.S. Deputy General James Cole. This was to deprioritize the enforcement of these types of laws against state-licensed and completely legal cannabis businesses. In 2014, The Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (FinCEN), a bureau of the Department of the Treasury, issued guidance on how banks could work with cannabis businesses. 

However, in 2018 then-Attorney General Jeff Sessions, a known opposer of any type of cannabis reform, revoked the Cole Memorandum. Although FinCEN state that the established cannabis industry guidelines will remain in effect, most banks are aware of and uncomfortable working in that financial grey area.

Final Thoughts

The cannabis companies that do choose to operate within it have to submit extensive reporting and pay astronomical fees, and even then, most financial institutions will only work with large, well-established companies. According to Tom DiGiovanni, CFO at Harborside Collective, there are roughly 60 U.S. finance companies that actively work with the cannabis industry.

FinCEN reports that as of September 2019, 563 banks and 160 credit unions provided some form of banking services to marijuana-related businesses; although how much service they are willing to provide is incredibly variable.

CLICK HERE to read the full text of the CA AB 1525

Thanks for stopping by CBD TESTERS, your hub for all things cannabis-related. Stop by regularly and make sure to subscribe to the Medical Cannabis Weekly Newsletter to keep up-to-date on all the most interesting industry topics.

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Will Legal Synthetic Cannabinoids Take Over Cannabis Industry?

We live in a world of synthetics. Most of our clothing is no longer cotton, but a mix of plastics. Much of our food is made of chemicals that can barely be pronounced. And now cannabis, our favorite smokable medicine and recreational pastime, might be replaced soon with legal synthetic cannabinoids.

It’s a world of synthetics

My mother used to work with a guy that had a great hookup for getting Coach bags. For anyone unfamiliar with the brand, Coach produces high quality leather bags, that come with a nice high price tag. My mother was buying tons of them, passing them on as gifts, and using a different one herself every day. They weren’t real of course, although I don’t remember how she found this out. They were knock-offs. Products that looked almost exactly the same, that felt almost exactly the same, but were actually made of entirely different materials, and overall of lesser quality. My mother was very unhappy when she realized what was going on, and never spoke again to her workmate who had bamboozled her, but buying synthetic products is pretty standard, and a lot of the time, most people never know that what they have isn’t the real thing.

Aren’t synthetic cannabinoids already a big thing?

Yes! Massive! In fact, if you read around the internet, you might get a little confused. Every time you see words like ‘spice’ and ‘k2’ being spoken about in reference to cannabis, its referring to synthetic cannabinoids. So, what’s the difference between these synthetic cannabinoids, and the legal synthetic cannabinoids that biotech industries are rushing to create and put on the market? Good question. While large biotech firms have the money and ability to make different concoctions, they aren’t technically producing anything terribly far off from the illegal version that people are constantly being warned against with terror stories of a few people dead over years of time. In the article cited it should be noted that most of the deaths weren’t even attributed to the synthetic cannabis, but rather a rat poison contaminant. Of course, somehow, those stories are all forgotten, or pushed aside, when the synthetics being spoken about come from companies that can sell their products above board, and have them taxed by the government. Funny how that works, right? While I suppose one could make the argument that its regulated vs unregulated, and that one is more dangerous than the other, the lack of relevant deaths from the unregulated version (no matter how much the very few that occur are publicized, let’s remember what it really means to have an epidemic of overdoses), and the standard story of putting down the one that doesn’t make the government tax dollars, while promoting the one that does – and which brings billions to large biotech companies – isn’t an unfamiliar story at all. So no, synthetic cannabis is far from new. I was smoking Mr. Nice Guy in Tel Aviv 10 years ago, and word on the street back then is that it was all synthetics. Now, with a massive 180º, the very thing being warned against constantly, is now the new thing being pushed by large biotech corporations.

synthetic cannabinoids
synthetic cannabinoids

The new world of cannabis synthetics

The production of synthetic cannabis seems to be twofold. Sometimes it’s just about creating an alternate version (that can legally be patented), and sometimes it’s about large scale production of a substance that is found in only tiny, miniscule amounts. Like, for example, CBG, or cannabigerol, a cannabinoid that makes up only about 1% of a cannabis plant by the time of harvest, and which has been associated – much like CBD – with pain management, as an anti-inflammatory, with neurodegenerative diseases, and with glaucoma. In fact, Willow Biosciences, has partnered with manufacturer Albany Molecular Research to create a large scale production of the cannabinoid – which also like CBD, has not been associated with psychoactive effects, making it a good addition to the medical cannabis family.

Willow is a Canadian company out of Calgary, but it’s already got a lot of competition. US based Biomedican Inc., of Fremont, California, is giving Willow a run for its money, claiming to already have a CBG strain that’s ready for mass production. Two other companies,  Demetrix and Amyris, are also looking to get specifically into the CBG game. In what is to me an incredibly and profoundly misconstrued statement, Headset, which apparently tracks cannabis trends, made the statement that cannabinoids on the market today are currently plant-derived for the most part, particularly with products like vape pens, but that synthetic versions should be coming soon. Now, this thought would have a lot more meaning if we weren’t constantly being told to stay away from ‘spice’ and ‘k2’, which are black market synthetic cannabinoids. In fact, the majority of vape pens being sold in a place like California, which has the biggest legal cannabis market, are knock-offs, and that means synthetic cannabinoids!! Whoever made the statement at Headset, which was picked up by Inquirer, must have only been speaking of the legal market, and the thing about cannabis, is that if you’re only looking at the legal market, you’re missing so much of what goes on. So much so that we’re having a conversation about legal synthetic cannabinoids as if they just came out, when the majority of us vaping pens, or smoking ‘fake weed’, have been using them for years…and generally without incident.

What are they making synthetics of?

Pretty much anything that can be isolated from the cannabis plant and serves some understood value. CBN, CBG, THC-A, THC-V, Delta-8 THC… This is probably a good time to remind about Marinol. While this whole discussion goes on about synthetics, its easy to forget that along with all the black market synthetics that are warned against, there’s also Marinol. Marinol, also known as Dronabinol, is an entirely synthetic cannabis medication which has been around since 1986 and is produced by several pharmaceutical companies at this point. So, not even pharmaceutically a new idea, it is quite possible that pharmaceutical versions of cannabis may not have, as of yet, made the dent in the industry that they were intended to.

dronabinol
dronabinol

Why synthetics?

This should be more obvious than it probably is to most people. If the majority of vape pens out there are knock-offs, and if mass producing ‘fake weed’ is cheaper (probably wouldn’t have been done if it was more expensive as criminal organizations aren’t generally looking to produce knock-offs at higher prices), than it should be understood that in the case of cannabis, fake is cheaper. This means that extracting real cannabinoids is going to be a much more expensive and difficult process than creating synthetics that can then be mass produced at lesser cost.

If you take a step back, this becomes almost silly. Growing cannabis is one of the easiest things to do, and very cheap. Just consider that in any legal place, a person can generally grow their own plants. But once it becomes a regulated market, and prices are jacked up, its no longer cheap, especially when considering dispensary prices, and massive taxes. Synthetics, on the other hand, make it cheaper again – bringing it back to where it would likely be priced if it were on the black market (although I can’t confirm this as there isn’t a price point to compare right now). It also does something else though… plants can’t be patented, at least not in their natural form. However, changed, or synthetic versions, can be. So, while the cannabis game has been hard for pharmaceutical companies to control – creating a non-plant version gives our biotech and pharmaceutical compatriots a way to create a substance that can be patented.

What to expect

The general expectation is that the biotech and pharmaceutical industries will do everything they can to co-op the medical marijuana and general legal cannabis industries. Whether it will work or not is a different story. Sometimes pharmaceutical companies don’t have the pull they wish. If they did, everyone would be using Marinol, and Sativex already, and that’s not the case. The problem with cannabis, when it comes to big pharma, is that cannabis isn’t a pharmaceutical drug unless its made to be one. If the people are never interested in these new medical advents, then the old rules remain, and people keep smoking the plant. If big pharma can produce a product at the right price point, that’s accessible enough, and gets the job done, it could be a very different story. In this particular instance it’s an interesting battle for the market, and its hard to say how it will go. In the case of cannabis, the thing to remember is that we don’t technically need all this, and the more production that goes into it, the higher the cost, and the more need to find synthetic answers.

The takeaway

It looks like the legal medicinal cannabis market, (and possibly recreational one), will soon be flooded with legal synthetic cannabinoids. What will this really mean? Well, that’s up to all of you. If you want your plant to be a plant, then smoke your plant and nature wins. If you’re cool with the synthetic version, that go out and use it. The ability of the synthetic market to do well has mainly to do with the ability of biotech companies and governments to convince their people that synthetics are a better answer.

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Additional Information On California’s CBD Ruling

The US Hemp Roundtable, the hemp industry’s leading national advocacy organization, is profoundly disappointed that the California Senate leadership refused to allow a vote on AB 2028 (Aguiar-Curry, Wicks and Wilk), which would have legalized the use of hemp CBD in all products, to advance before the end of the 2019-20 legislative session.

As a result, California will not benefit from tens of millions of new tax dollars or thousands of new jobs that AB 2028 would have delivered. California continues to lag behind 21 other states, including Florida, Texas, Virginia and Ohio, that have already enacted hemp CBD laws and are drawing business away from California.

AB 2028 represented the product of intense negotiations between the Roundtable, its allies in the California hemp farming and business industries, and Governor Gavin Newsom, an effort that legislative leaders had urged proponents to undertake. The measure received broad bipartisan support as evidenced by its passage in an earlier bill with unanimous votes by the Assembly, as well as the Senate Health and Business and Professions Committees.

“We have been told by staff to Senate President Pro Tem Toni Atkins that there simply was not enough time to consider the amendments to the bill in the waning days of session,” said Jonathan Miller, the Roundtable’s general counsel. “Assuming that is the case, we are optimistic that a reintroduction of AB 2028 at the earliest possible date, with any necessary technical fixes, will ultimately be supported by both houses of the Legislature and signed by Governor Newsom.”

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As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, the California economy is profoundly distressed. Tax revenues have been hard hit, jobs have disappeared and the ability of the state to rebuild itself in a timely fashion is uncertain. The hemp industry, especially its hemp CBD market, represents a major source of new state and local revenues that can be realized quickly.

National market analyses (Brightfield Group and Fortune Business Insights, among others) project that the hemp CBD food and beverage industry alone will generate more than $2 billion annually by 2023. If enacted, AB 2028 would have pegged California’s share of that market at approximately $300 million in the first full year of operation.

AB 2028 would have achieved several critical milestones:

  • Allow hemp CBD to be used in food, beverages and dietary supplements, as well as cosmetics and other topicals.
  • Ensure consumer safety, including label standards that provide essential information to consumers.
  • Require CBD consumer product testing that mirrors comprehensive testing requirements for cannabis.
  • Apply existing requirements of the Sherman Food, Drug and Cosmetics Act to all hemp CBD consumer products.

Miller added, “We are grateful to the bill’s authors for their unwavering leadership on this important issue and to the Governor for working with us to craft an effective path forward for an industry that has been nothing less than meteoric in other parts of the country. We are confident that California policymakers will embrace this policy before the hemp farming and the CBD industry become nothing more than an afterthought in the California economy.”

Full Interview with Hemp Roundtable Member Jonathan Miller

When will the legislative session reopen to continue this?

The Legislature reconvenes for an organizing session in December. A bill could be introduced on that day but they recess again until January 4; no action could be taken until after that date. There is speculation about the Governor calling a special session in the fall; the governor has said he is open to it. However, it is very uncertain that he will do so. If he does call a special session, a bill could be introduced as long as it was consistent with the purpose of the special session/.

Will there be any additional changes to the bill you would like to add in that time?

There may be some fine-tuning and technical clean up that we can seek to accomplish. We are open to discussing other changes, although we are realistic about the interest of the Administration in terms of further substantive changes.

There’s already a large market for these products, if California doesn’t step up and enact appropriate legislation, will it drive CBD products to the black market also? Causing the same problems they’ve had with marijuana all these years?

There is no larger prospective market than California, especially for CBD food and beverage. The promise of the CBD market nationally is only fulfilled if California is part of that market. We don’t anticipate a black market like the one that continues to exist for marijuana for two primary reasons: 1) there was a robust black and grey market for marijuana for years before it became fully legal; there has never been one for hemp CBD, and 2) unlike marijuana that was largely a smokable product on the black market, hemp CBD is mostly a manufactured product like food and beverage, which is harder to create in a black market. Even if a bill is not enacted, there will still be topical hemp CBD products legal to be manufactured and sold in California.

If the language in the bill doesn’t change, what exactly does that mean for CBD business owners?

Business owners who are currently based and operating in California will continue to be at risk of enforcement actions by the state and counties. They will be faced with an existential question as to their continued viability in California and may relocate their business, its tax generation and its jobs to another state. Businesses that are based out of California and have a presence in California or are interested in expanding to California may choose to pull out of California, shrink their presence in California or refocus their energies on one of the 21 states that have legalized hemp CBD.

Thanks for stopping by CBD TESTERS, your hub for all things medical cannabis. Stop by regularly and make sure to subscribe to the Medical Cannabis Weekly Newsletter to keep up-to-date on all the most interesting industry topics.

RESOURCES:

Synthetic Cannabinoids (Are they synthetic cannabinoids safe?)
The Endocannabinoid System Explained (Why Cannabis Is Good for Our Bodies)
Everything You Need To Know About CBD Isolate (a deep look into hemp extracts)

Cannabinoids 101 – Spotlight on CBN (Cannabinol)
Your Complete Guide to EU GMP-Certified CBD Isolate and Distillate – Spotlight on the regulated EU market

Everything You Need To Know About CBG Isolate
Newest Cannabinoid Powerhouse – CBC – What Can It Do for You?
What is DELTA 8 THC (FAQ: Great resource to learn about DELTA 8THC)
The CBD Flowers Weekly newsletter (your top resource for all things smokable hemp flowers)
The Medical Cannabis Weekly newsletter (International medical cannabis business report)
The Legal Landscape Of CBD Hemp Flower In Europe

The Delta 8 Weekly Newsletter (All you need to know about Delta 8 thc)Regulators Go After Smokable Hemp Flower – What Does The Future Hold?
The Complex Issue of Marijuana and Hemp Business and Legalization On Tribal Land
Government Assistance Options for U.S. Hemp Farmers Affected By COVID-19

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Delta-8 THC Contaminated Products, or Just Bad Press?

News stories are popping up all over the interweb about Delta-8 THC contaminated products. Where did this info come from, and how valid is this story?

What is delta-8 THC?

Most people are familiar with Delta-9 THC, the standard THC associated with marijuana and the psychoactive effects of cannabis. Delta-9 THC is the most prevalent cannabinoid found in marijuana, and is generally sourced from high-THC cannabis plants. Delta 8 THC, on the other hand, is nearly the same as delta-9 chemically with one small difference. Delta-8 has a double bond on its 8th carbon chain rather than its 9th (like with delta-9). Delta-8 is also found in much smaller quantities, and because of this, can be sourced from either high-THC marijuana, or low-THC hemp. The ability to source it from industrial hemp created a loophole of legality at first for delta-8, which is known to have similar effects as delta-9, albeit not quite as intense, and without the anxiety effects, which actually makes it preferable for cannabis users who have issues with the anxiety produced.

In terms of legality, a loophole was created when the 2018 farm bill separated high-THC marijuana from low-THC hemp, legalizing the latter and what is produced from it, while not technically making any legalization of a THC compound. This was further updated by new rules in the summer of 2020. The first bullet point of this update reads as follows: “It modifies 21 CFR 1308.11(d)(31) by adding language stating that the definition of “Tetrahydrocannabinols” does not include “any material, compound, mixture, or preparation that falls within the definition of hemp set forth in 7 U.S.C. 1639o.” While there is still nothing solid in terms of a specific legalization for delta-8 THC, this does back up that substances obtained from hemp are not definitionally THC by US law. Essentially, it continues the delta-8 THC loophole, and the one thing we know from the world around us, is that if you give an inch, they’ll take a mile. Gray area is as good as legal in the world of legal cannabis these days and so delta-8 THC can be found over the counter in tons of places.

So, what’s the problem?

Recent reports have made it around the internet about bleach delta-8 THC contaminated products. The report seems to be curtesy of Julie Helmer, the CEO of Freshbros, which is, itself, a CBD/hemp company. According to Helmer, there are thousands of delta 8 products that are contaminated with bleach, and that consumers never know. The reason for the bleach contaminated products, according to Helmer, is to get rid of delta-8’s naturally rose-ish color, since clear is often a sign of quality for distillates.

The main problem with this story is that the only person who seems to think there’s a problem is Julie Helmer of Freshbros, a private company that sells these products, and seems to want to take the lead in terms of having the ‘safest’ and ‘cleanest’ products. In fact, every article I found written on the topic is relevant to Helmer’s statement’s only, and most of these articles go on to give Freshbros’ advice for cleaner products, the kind of move used to get ahead in a market by putting out the idea that only this company would have or could have done it properly.

The takeaway

As of right now there is nothing official saying there are delta-8 THC contaminated products. No testing facility, or other private company, or third-party watchdog group has said anything. The only statement being made is being made by a private company that stands to gain more market share by denigrating the existing market.

Does this mean all delta-8 THC products are safe? Not at all! The very best point Freshbros makes isn’t the point it was trying to make. New products that don’t go through regulation can be dicey, and it is important to keep an eye on manufacturing practices to ensure corners aren’t being cut. Maybe bleach really is an issue, but maybe its not at all…it certainly can’t be known by the information out right now. More will have to be done in the future to ensure unregulated cannabis products are not messed with, contaminated, or adulterated in any other form.

Where can you get safe Delta-8 THC products?

If you are interested in finding the best Delta 8 THC products, with proper lab results and good product reviews, sign to the Delta 8 Weekly newsletter, below, where every week we bring you the best available Delta 8 THC products.

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Cannabis Cosmetics: What’s Allowed, What’s Not, and Where to Find Them

Cannabis in cosmetics is becoming a big thing all over the world, but what laws are there to govern the industry, and which parts of the plant can be used?

Much like nearly everything else pertaining to cannabis, different locations have their own specifications. In the US, for example, the FDA has made no official move to set regulatory standards for cannabis in cosmetics, though it has been spending time trying to get a handle on CBD in general. As of the last farm bill, industrial hemp with THC amounts of up to .3% is legal for industrial use, with some gray area over the use of cannabinoid preparations, which still mainly remain illegal.

When looking at regulation for something like cannabis in cosmetics, there are two main factors to consider: 1) the THC content, since nearly all cannabis cosmetics will be focused around CBD, and 2) which part of the plant is used for the raw materials, as some countries have different stipulations here.

To learn more about cannabis and important industry products, subscribe to the Medical Cannabis Weekly Newsletter


Cannabis Cosmetics in the US of A

An important thing to understand about the US is that the FDA, under the FD&C Act, isn’t required to approve cosmetic products or ingredients, with the exception of many color additives, and any substance that is prohibited or restricted otherwise.

In fact, most people have probably already noticed the message found on many herbal products that says “These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration.” The products they’re found on aren’t illegal, just simply not under regulation by the FDA, or legally requiring of it.

As of right now, no cannabis, or cannabis-derived ingredients, are specifically banned from cosmetics as they are not specifically addressed by the law. This doesn’t mean that such products get out of being up to code for all other requirements and regulations, even if not specifically mentioned.

A product also cannot make a medical claim, and if it does so, it can be considered a drug, and is in violation of the FD&C Act, for which the FDA can then take action against it, depending on if it sees fit. Having said all this, if the US does update FDA regulation to include specific cannabinoids for cosmetics, then production facilities would have to comply.

This lack of official regulation in the US hasn’t stopped companies based in other countries eager to get cannabis products out, from coming up with their own ways to get them on shelves in the US.

Sephora Makes Its Own Standards

When it comes to big business, not everyone wants to wait on official laws when the official laws are taking too long. In March, giant beauty retailer Sephora, based out of France, set its own standards for the use of CBD in its products.

All hemp products now sold through Sephora must comply with certain standards including: containing full spectrum or broad spectrum extracts with no isolates, being made from hemp grown in the US, having a certificate of analysis that can be viewed by the buyer, going through three rounds of testing to account for purity and contaminants, and complying with Sephora’s own standards which limit the use of certain chemicals.

Sephora is the first major company to come up with its own independent system of regulation. How this legally stands the test of time, is hard to say.

CBD Beauty Products are Taking Over the Industry

Cannabis Cosmetics in the EU

The EU has its own perspective when it comes to regulating cannabinoids in cosmetics. According to the Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs (1961) and European Cosmetic Regulation 1223/2009, cannabis and cannabis extracts are prohibited from use in cosmetics, however, as CBD is not specifically mentioned in the Convention, it is not technically included in this.

Earlier this year, to deal with the ensuing gray area that has risen as a result of a booming CBD industry and insufficient regulation, the European Commission added both plant-derived and synthetic CBD to its list of approved cosmetic ingredients. It also stipulates that if plant-derived, it must come from hemp, or low-THC cannabis (max THC, .2%).  

The EU Cosmetic Ingredient Database further stipulates which parts of the cannabis plant are legal to use in cosmetic preparations. On a United Nations level, there are already certain restrictions, like not using resin from cannabis sativa, and that flower and leaf extracts are prohibited for use. As of right now, legally in the EU, only cannabis seeds and stems can be used for such products.

To make matters slightly more complicated, each member state of the EU also has its own laws, which are sometimes more extreme than standard EU regulation. These differences cause a disharmony in the EU, and can lead to trade disparities, like what is going on right now in France vs the EU. In this case, the question is about the ability to import and export CBD products freely across EU borders, so long as standard EU regulations are met.

What About the UK?

For a long time the UK operated under standard EU law when it came to many things, now it operates on its own again, but as of the present still uses the same general regulational standards. When it comes to cannabis in cosmetics, UK regulation is governed by The Misuse of Drugs Act – 1971, and 2001, and Regulation 1223/2009.

According to the combination of laws, cannabis seeds are not controlled, and the oils and extracts from them are legal for use in cosmetics so long as the finished product has been deemed safe. When it comes to cannabis leaves, the law states that while the leaves are a controlled substance (class B drug), purified solvent extracts can be considered not controlled substances so long as they don’t contain cannabinoids that are controlled substances (like THC).

Preparations cannot involve the flowering tops of plants. When it comes to the use of CBD itself in finished cosmetics, UK law states that pure synthetic and plant-based CBD are allowable so long as the CBD does not come from the flowering tops, does not contain any amount of a controlled substance including other controlled cannabinoids like THC, or has been qualified as exempt under the exempt product definition as per 2001 regulation.

From Hundreds Of CBD Suppliers To A Dozen – Potential Impact Of UK Regulator’s Novel Food Move

…And Canada?

Canada proses an interesting situation because of all the locations mentioned so far, it’s the only one with federal legalization. Even so, this does not automatically permit the use of all cannabis substances in all places. This is not the case at all. In Canada, the Cannabis Act was passed in 2018, which defines cannabis as all parts of the plant, and everything that comes from it.

According to Health Canada’s Cosmetic Ingredient Hotlist for prohibited substances, cannabis is not allowed for use in cosmetics. On the other hand, industrial hemp in Canada is defined as cannabis with no more than .3% THC in the leaves and flowers, and is not included in the Cannabis Act. Derivatives of industrial hemp can be used in cosmetics so long as the THC content is 10 μg/g or less. For this reason, hemp seed oil is often seen as an ingredient listed in products on shelves.

How much sense this all makes is questionable at best. A full federal legalization for internal use makes the nit-picking of topical use ingredients almost funny, and just, wildly inconsistent. Of course, in the world of cannabis legalization, wildly inconsistent is practically a middle name, and nearly every country has it.

Where Can Cannabis Cosmetics Be Found?

Cannabis cosmetics can be found in tons of places at this point, though this isn’t to say that all of them are legal, or will remain legal. CBD cosmetics are popular in the EU, Canada, and the US, and anywhere CBD is legal, there are sure to be some cosmetic products, given the general gray area of not having set systems of regulation.

Of course, this could easily change. Later this year, WHO recommendations will be voted on, and this vote will determine whether CBD can be legally separated from the rest of the cannabis plant. Right now, particularly in places like the EU, there’s a lot of gray area and inconsistency. CBD products are coming out left and right, and though they may be legal by local regulation, this is in opposition to the UN’s Single Convention on Narcotic Substances which does not as of yet differentiate CBD from the rest of the plant.

WHO recommends removing CBD and scheduling it separately, thereby changing the laws that have been governing cannabis internationally since 1961. If the recommendations are not taken, a much harder stance can be taken on the use of CBD in general, regardless of where it is used. Considering how big the industry is, this could actually cause a lot of problems, and a lot of backlash from countries that no longer agree with the world stance.

Ban On Natural CBD In European Cosmetics Lifted In Victory For ‘Common Sense’

Conclusion

Essentially, any country that allows for the production of cannabis products, is likely to allow some kinds of cosmetics to be produced, even if they’re solely meant for export to more lenient countries. When it comes to production, the onus is on the producing country to meet the regulatory guidelines of the country of import. In this way, many countries can produce such cosmetics, while only a few might be able to legally accept them.

The vote on WHO recommendations will likely play a large role in the future of cannabis cosmetics. If the recommendations are taken (which I think they will be), it can be expected that CBD cosmetics will start showing up all over the place, with many countries loosening their laws to allow the market legally.

Looking to learn more about Cannabis industry products? Subscribe to the Medical Cannabis Weekly newsletter.

The post Cannabis Cosmetics: What’s Allowed, What’s Not, and Where to Find Them appeared first on CBD Testers.

With Some Interesting Regulatory Omissions, Poland Overwhelmingly Passed Medical Cannabis Bill

Poland’s recently instituted medical cannabis market is just starting to take off, with open-ended regulation related to the creation and exportation of products.

In Poland, drugs are governed by the Act on Counteracting Drug Addiction, which doesn’t make a differentiation between cannabis and other drugs. Simple possession or use can land a person in prison for three years. Poland is a treatment before prison country when it comes to drug use, and courts can order offenders into treatment programs instead of prison.

Fines are often given as an alternative as well, as is the removal of certain rights for up to a year as punishment.  As of 2011, Poland adopted a law of tolerance for small amounts of drugs which gives authorities the ability to drop cases, mainly those including cannabis. While some reports show this to be the reason for thousands of cases being dropped in the subsequent years, other sources report that offenders are often still taken to court for three grams or less.

Sale and supply crimes (including importing and exporting) are also predictably illegal in Poland, with prison sentences up to five years, with closer to one-year sentences for less serious offenses. Prison sentences for trafficking large amounts can be as high as 12 years.

In Poland, there isn’t a distinction made between growing cannabis, coca (as in the plant responsible for cocaine), and opium (the basis of opiate drugs). Large scale production of any of these three plants can garner a prison sentence of 6 months – 8 years. While there are technically no personal use laws for growing small amounts, appeals have been entertained by the court system, which has so far upheld the current laws, but left room for change in a 2014 verdict concerning a man caught growing for personal use, by stating that legislative decisions should be based in research and the experience of other countries.

Poland has the same legal stipulation concerning cannabis seeds as many other countries like Ireland, where the sale and import of them is perfectly legal, but germinating them is not.

To learn more about cannabis, subscribe to the Medical Cannabis Weekly Newsletter


What about CBD and hemp?

In the case of both CBD (cannabidiol) and industrial hemp, the laws are a bit gray. CBD has not been officially regulated into any category, and though its generally thought of as a food item, there is confusion as to whether that is the correct classification, or if it should be considered a medicine, or a supplement.

It is legal, however. So is industrial hemp, although, much like CBD, there isn’t official legislation concerning max THC levels. As of right now it’s assumed that Poland abides by the EU standard of no more than .2% THC max for both industrial hemp products and CBD, but its unclear if this is upheld.

Medical cannabis legalization

As of November 1st, 2017, medicinal cannabis is legal in Poland. The bill was introduced and pushed relentlessly by Kielce member Piotr Krzysztof Liroy-Marzec, also known simply as ‘Liroy’, who entered politics after gaining notoriety as a rap star. When the law was finally voted on in the Lower House of Parliament, after going through many revisions, it passed nearly unanimously with 440 votes in the affirmative and only two detractors.

Back in 2015, a poll conducted to established what Poles thought of legalization, found that a huge 68% supported medical use fully (only 18% wanted no change in laws at all), even making the statement that denying access is tantamount to cruel behavior. This legalization did nothing to change cultivation laws. It required all cannabis to be imported from other EU countries or Canada at an estimated extra cost of $550 per patient per month.

In February of 2019 products finally hit shelves with two Canadian companies securing the first supply deals: Aurora Cannabis Inc, and Canopy Growth Corporation. As of February 2020, the supply of medicinal cannabis coming in was not meeting the demand of patients.

Aurora’s New Contract To Supply Italian Medical Cannabis Market

Qualifications for licensing to grow

Poland did some interesting legislative work when it comes to their licensing and production regulation. When it comes to hemp cultivation, the laws aren’t all that specific leaving some room for prospective growers to enter into the international medicinal cannabis market. Hemp is approved for pharmaceutical as well as industrial purposes so long as the THC content does not exceed .2% (as per European standard).

There are no restrictions on import, export, or processing, leaving the door wide open for all kinds of maneuvers from simple exportation to the importation of materials for product processing. Growing must be carried out in approved locations, using only certified seeds.

Growing permits are issued by whoever oversees the geographical location, whether that be a mayor, city president, or commune head, and before the licensing process can be finished, there must be a hemp buyer contracted who is approved by the governing body for that geographical location. Security infrastructure requirements must be met as well to ensure the hemp is not used unlawfully. Licenses are not given to applicants who have criminal records for the following drug-related offenses:

  • Illegally growing poppies, coca, or hemp.
  • Illegally growing fiber hemp or low-morphine poppy.
  • Seizure for the appropriation or theft of specified illicit substances.

Since there is no specific guideline set for exactly what hemp can be used for, the only requirement is for the final product to meet one of the categories approved for hemp growth: cosmetic products, pharmaceutical, nutritional, chemical, textile, pulp and paper, production of building materials, and general seed production.

A New Age Of Construction? Introducing Hempcrete And Hemp Plastic

Quality control?

Nope, none of that. As an example of the lack of regulation regarding quality in general in the cannabis markets, that part somehow was not included, with no guidelines for testing, limits for pesticides, or other measures for safety, written in.

It also means, on a more immediate and practical level, that producers of products like CBD aren’t required to specify the amount of CBD in the product, and the country and industry itself provide no useful information on things like CBD dosage, dosing by weight, general precautions, or other helpful information related to the product.

A relatively large gap when considering that nearly every respectable product made today will tell you the specifics of its ingredients, and how to effectively and safely use it. One could even say it’s an egregious omission in regulatory law, possibly more an indication of a rush to put the laws in place, and hopefully an error that will be rectified in further regulatory updates.

Conclusion

Every country has its own way of doing things when it takes the plunge into the medicinal or recreational cannabis markets. As there is no global guidebook for the ‘right’ way to grow cannabis, each location is left to establish its own laws for the protection of its own people and the expansion of its own economy. Rushing into the market is becoming commonplace, sort of like shoot first, ask questions later, with the cleaning up of regulatory errors, mishaps, and loopholes done in the aftermath. Chances are, what Poland left out will be filled in, in the coming months or years.

Poland opened up a good service for its citizens, and is improving on it by allowing cannabis cultivation within the country to lower prices for patients. And it also left an interesting door open for the expansion of revenue into the country, with only time to tell how this regulatory setup will play out for the country, which already has the 10th largest economy in all of Europe.

RESOURCES:

Synthetic Cannabinoids (Are they synthetic cannabinoids safe?)
The Endocannabinoid System Explained (Why Cannabis Is Good for Our Bodies)
Everything You Need To Know About CBD Isolate (a deep look into hemp extracts)

Cannabinoids 101 – Spotlight on CBN (Cannabinol)
Your Complete Guide to EU GMP-Certified CBD Isolate and Distillate – Spotlight on the regulated EU market

Everything You Need To Know About CBG Isolate
Newest Cannabinoid Powerhouse – CBC – What Can It Do for You?
What is DELTA 8 THC (FAQ: Great resource to learn about DELTA 8THC)
The CBD Flowers Weekly newsletter (your top resource for all things smokable hemp flowers)
The Medical Cannabis Weekly newsletter (International medical cannabis business report)
The Legal Landscape Of CBD Hemp Flower In Europe

The Delta 8 Weekly Newsletter (All you need to know about Delta 8 thc)Regulators Go After Smokable Hemp Flower – What Does The Future Hold?
The Complex Issue of Marijuana and Hemp Business and Legalization On Tribal Land
Government Assistance Options for U.S. Hemp Farmers Affected By COVID-19

The post With Some Interesting Regulatory Omissions, Poland Overwhelmingly Passed Medical Cannabis Bill appeared first on CBD Testers.

Recreational Cannabis is Legal in Georgia – But Who Knew?

We all know about Uruguay, right? First country to legalize recreational cannabis. We also all know about Canada, and the growing number of US states that allow legal smoking. Some of us are even aware that Mexico too is a recently legalized country. But who knew about Georgia?

As a former Eastern Bloc country, Georgia sits to the east of the Black sea, bordered on the south by Turkey and Armenia, on the east by Azerbaijan, and by Russia in the north. Population estimates from about six years ago put the population at approximately 5.9 million, with a life expectancy of around 75 years. Georgia has been a republic since 1936 when it separated from the Transcaucasian Soviet Socialist Republic with Armenia and Azerbaijan, while still a part of the USSR. In 1991 Georgia proclaimed its overall independence, although this was certainly not a cut and dry experience, leading instead to years of discord between Russia and Georgia.

Georgia is considered a developing country. It’s a member of the UN and the Council of Europe. It is not a part of the EU, and not subject to EU laws and mandates, nor is it currently a candidate for EU membership. Georgia actually contains two regions that are independent – Abkhazia and South Ossetia – however these areas are generally considered to be a part of Georgia under Russian occupation to most of the rest of the world. Georgia faced incredible economic fallout with the dissolution of the USSR, and has only recently been showing a strengthened and growing economy, can cannabis help contribute to this?

To learn more about cannabis, subscribe to the Medical Cannabis Weekly Newsletter


Georgia and cannabis

There are certain locations that stand out when it comes to cannabis, mainly for their wonky, disconnected sets of laws – and Georgia is one of those places. As a smaller country which doesn’t get as much press attention, it tends to go under the radar.

Up until laws changed in 2018, Georgia had very strict drug policies, with users often being jailed for up to 14 years. Georgia was also very big on forcible drug testing, with civilian activist group White Noise Movement claiming an average of 112 people were forcibly tested every day, costing millions of dollars over the years. Forced drug screenings were one of the three platforms that proponents of change focused on, along with the decriminalization of smaller amounts of drugs, and to make dosage calculations by law. Georgia was essentially using very strict, zero-tolerance, drug measures to collect fines, bringing in $11.3 million in one year alone.

One of the reasons the issue of cannabis came up was in the context of the 2018 elections (often a time for new legislative measures to be introduced). When parliament began drafting the law, it was primarily to allow government licensed companies in Georgia to grow cannabis for export, thus entering into the global cannabis markets. According to Akaki Zoidze, chairman for parliament’s committee on health care, “If we tap 10 percent of that market, we could be looking at a billion dollars of [annual] income for the economy.” As of right now, this aspect is still uncertain.

Legalization

All of this changed in July of 2018 when Georgia’s constitutional court ruled that it’s unconstitutional to punish a person for using cannabis since it poses no threat to anyone else, and punishing use is restrictive of personal freedoms. In fact, the court stated that unless a third party is being affected, or the laws of use are broken, there will be no punishment for using cannabis at all.

This, however, did nothing to change cultivation and supply laws, which are still punishable offenses. The ruling is interesting partly because of its subjectiveness. While Georgia ruled that it doesn’t hurt others, a country like Germany has taken the opposite stance, continuing its illegalization by referring to it as a self-harm measure. These are two very different and distinct ways of looking at the same thing.

This ruling was actually not the first to chip away at the previously harsh Georgian drug laws. A year prior to this ruling, the same court ruled to decriminalize marijuana use, calling it a non-judicial affair.

Germany – The Prime European Destination for North American Cannabis Firms

So, here’s a basic recap… In Georgia it’s now perfectly legal to have and use cannabis. It is perfectly illegal to grow that cannabis, to buy it, or to sell it. It seems cultivation on a government level might be legalized, but there isn’t a regulated system to govern it yet. Much like Washington DC, the laws create a bit of a conundrum, although DC doesn’t actually ban personal cultivation, leaving at least a small window for people to legally obtain their cannabis.

As of right now in Georgia, while it might be legal to have and use, there is no actual legal way of obtaining it, creating, essentially, a reverse loophole. What this also means is that while Georgia is now technically a legalized country (sort of), there is no structured or regulated market to speak of, and no law to support one right now. As of right now, the new legalization is most applicable to citizens with little to no information released about exportation.

What punishments are there?

As mentioned, having and using cannabis are now legal in Georgia, but where it is done makes a difference. A person cannot smoke in any public place whether it be a bus, a café, a park, a school, or a workplace. If caught smoking in a public place, the fine is for 800-1,200 lari (approximately $300-450).

The age of consent for using marijuana in Georgia is 21 years of age, and those found using or possessing below that age are subject to a fine of 500-1,500 lari (approximately $190-560). If a person over 21 years of age encourages cannabis use in someone under 21 years of age, they can be subject to a prison sentence of 6-10 years. Plus, simply being under the influence of cannabis while around minors can incur a fine of 1,000-1,500 lari (approximately $375-560).

Not only is it illegal to use cannabis in a workplace since it’s a public place, using in a workplace is considered a separate violation in and of itself. Regardless of the kind of work, whether its public or private sector, and whether other people are around or not, being caught using during work can incur a fine of up to 1,500 lari (approximately $560). With some professions its considered even more dangerous – like doctors – and not only can a user incur a fine, but they’re also subject to losing whatever license they have to practice their vocation.

Anyone caught driving while under the influence is subject to criminal prosecution, and will likely pay a fine or serve a year in prison. If a driver under the influence injures another party, the sentence will be significantly steeper.

Macedonian Company Finally Wins EU-GMP Certification

The promotion and advertising of cannabis are also illegal, and those caught marketing products can pay between 5,000-10,000 lari (approximately $1,800-3,700).

While simple possession is no longer illegal, acquisition, storage, and transport are illegal in excess of 70 grams. No jail time is served for the acquisition of up to 70 grams (dried flower), or 100 grams (fresh flower).

A final word on cultivation and the reverse loophole: while personal cultivation is still illegal, there is a little gray area that allows a person to obtain cannabis. According to the law, a person can cultivate up to 151 grams without threat of a prison sentence, but not without any penalty. What this means is that while a person won’t be sent to jail, they will suffer some sort of punishment, even if that punishment is not standardized. In this way there is a bit of leeway, but cultivation still remains illegal.

Conclusion

One could certainly ask the question ‘why legalize a substance if obtaining that substance is still illegal?’ and it’s a very sound point. By Georgian law it’s permissible to smoke, but not permissible to obtain the smokable product. This means that if Georgians want to practice their now constitutionally backed right to smoke marijuana, they have to break the law to do so.

Perhaps this law is simply the beginning and in the next few years some of this mess will be cleaned up. As confusing, and backwards as it is, it’s also a breakthrough that should not be discounted, as Georgia is, after all, the very first former Eastern Bloc country to take such a liberal stance with cannabis. In the fight to legalize, laws are not always passed in the most sensical ways, and it often takes time to iron out the creases. It will be interesting to see where Georgia stands in another couple years from now.

Thanks for stopping by CBD TESTERS, your hub for all things medical cannabis. Stop by regularly and make sure to subscribe to the Medical Cannabis Weekly Newsletter to keep up-to-date on all the most interesting industry topics.

Resources:

The Endocannabinoid System Explained (Why Cannabis Is Good for Our Bodies)
Everything You Need To Know About CBD Isolate (a deep look into hemp extracts)
Cannabinoids 101 – Spotlight on CBN (Cannabinol)
EU GMP Extracts: CBD Isolate, CBD Distillate and CBG Isolate

Your Complete Guide to EU GMP-Certified CBD Isolate and Distillate – Spotlight on the regulated EU market
Everything You Need To Know About CBG Isolate

EU GMP-Certified Cannabinoid Isolates and Distillates Explained
Newest Cannabinoid Powerhouse – CBC – What Can It Do for You?
DELTA 8 THC Newsletter (The DELTA 8 THC Weekly Newsletter)
The CBD Flowers Weekly newsletter (your top resource for all things smokable hemp flowers)
The Medical Cannabis Weekly newsletter (International medical cannabis business report)
The Legal Landscape Of CBD Hemp Flower In Europe

Effective Immediately – Most Delta 8 THC Is Now ILLEGAL in The United States (Understanding the latest announcement by the DEA)
Hemp-Derived DELTA 8 THC Products Now Available Online (Understanding the difference between hemp-derived Delta 8 products, to isolate-made products)
Synthetic Cannabinoids (Are they synthetic cannabinoids safe?)Regulators Go After Smokable Hemp Flower – What Does The Future Hold?The Complex Issue of Cannabis and Hemp Business On Tribal Land
Government Assistance Options for U.S. Hemp Farmers Affected By COVID-19

EU Novel Food and The Legal Status of CBD Oil

The post Recreational Cannabis is Legal in Georgia – But Who Knew? appeared first on CBD Testers.

Thailand is 1st Asian Country to Legalize Medicinal Cannabis and Enter Global Market

Asian countries have not been known for their acceptance of cannabis either as a recreational drug, or for its medicinal value. Thailand is the first Asian country to break stride, legalizing medicinal cannabis, and opening up a global export market.

Change doesn’t always come quick, and Asian countries like China and Japan have been notoriously tough with their drug laws, even cannabis. This is true as well for countries like Singapore, Malaysia and Indonesia. In fact, getting caught with minor possession in such countries can earn a person a lifetime in prison, or even a death sentence.

So it’s no small feat that in 2018, Thailand’s military appointed National Legislative Assembly voted 166-0 to legalize medicinal marijuana. Before a law goes into force in Thailand, it also must be approved by Thailand’s reigning monarch, King Maha Vajiralongkorn. The legislation went into effect in 2019.

To learn more about cannabis, subscribe to the Medical Cannabis Weekly Newsletter


Thailand and cannabis

The legalization of medicinal cannabis, and the opening of a global export market did nothing to change the laws around recreational cannabis in Thailand. Cannabis still remains a category 5 narcotic under Thai drug laws and illegal possession of the plant can garner a person up to 15 years in prison, and approximately a 1.5 million baht fine (about $48,000). If a person is caught trafficking, they could face life in prison, or even the death sentence. The change in laws was covered under the Narcotics Act of 2019, which is a modified version of the Narcotics Act of 1979.

The medicinal legalization is strictly for those authorized by the government to cultivate and use the plant. Users are required to have a doctor’s prescription and a marijuana identification card.

The laws that originally legalized medical cannabis in 2018, are likely to be updated in 2020. The cabinet approved a Public Health Ministry proposal to expand the existing laws to allow patients, medical practitioners, and traditional medicine healers to cultivate cannabis. This authorization, should it pass, would allow a greater number of people to legally grow, including folk healers.

It is this amendment that would also allow for product producers to import and export as well as manufacture their own products. As it currently stands, production, import, and export are only for state agencies or those who work with them, this amendment would open up industry even further. The hope of the amendment is to help local manufacturers compete in the global market.

Right now, the amendment is just draft legislation. It’ll go to the Office of the Council of State to be examined, after that it will go to the House panel for further consideration. The panel will then forward it to the lower House.

How can a marijuana market help?

When it comes to estimating the value of markets, its easy to find many different numbers. Often, it simply suffices to say that a lot of money can be made. One estimate, for example, puts the possible Thailand legal marijuana market at about $150 billion.

Part of the purpose of the amendment is to boost wellness, travel, and agricultural sectors, with the first two showing a predilection for Thailand to become a hotspot for medical cannabis tourism. In fact, prior to the amendment being drafted, the Health Ministry had already created a facility to offer free cannabis medicine to patients, which is a separate entity from the other authorized clinics in the country that can prescribe cannabis – which number about 147.

Grey Market and Black Market in the World of Cannabis

Marut Jirasrattasiri, the director of the Department of Thai Traditional and Alternative Medicine stated in an interview, “Thailand is already a tourist destination for many foreigners, and marijuana will be another attraction for the country and for medical tourists.” Although he went on to say that priority would be given to Thai investors, this is not certain, and other sources have indicated the usefulness of outside investment.

While expanding business opportunities within a country is generally good for the economy, it’s even more important this year. Due to Covid, Thailand’s general economy is expected to shrink by approximately 8.5%, as of yet the biggest projected decline in Asia. Perhaps this is why the government has been acting so quickly to change laws and open new financial opportunities.

Medical marijuana clinic?

In the first week of 2020, Thailand opened its very first medical marijuana clinic in Bangkok. The clinic offers free cannabis oil treatments and general care to patients with different medical disorders like Parkinson’s, cancer, or even insomnia. On the very first day it was opened, the clinic brought in hundreds of patients with upwards of 3,700 more showing interest via the mobile application.

Four different drugs with different combinations and amounts of CBD and THC were given out. Most of the crowd was elderly, and patients were given vials of 5-10 milligrams. This is the first clinic to open where cannabis is a specialization, the staff are specifically trained in handling it, and its open full time, unlike other similar clinics across the country.

Medical marijuana tourism

While the clinics open in Thailand are for the Thai people, there is a push towards opening up Thailand’s medical benefits to people outside the country, thus creating a hotspot for medical marijuana tourism. There is currently draft legislation to allow foreign visitors to actually bring their own medicinal cannabis into Thailand so long as they have existing prescriptions.

While this wouldn’t be finalized until at least February 2021, it would possibly allow visitors to come in with as much as 90 days worth of cannabis medication. No further information was given as to whether this would involve only low-THC preparations or not, or how this would be reconciled with airlines which have their own laws about what substances can be brought on board.

Medical Cannabis Tourism Rising: Virgin Islands, Jamaica, and Thailand Set to Cash In

Pipat Ratchakitprakan, Thailand’s minister for Sports and Tourism, stated, “We would like to provide medical tour packages, such as detox, Thai massage and other wellness courses that use marijuana substances.” This was supported by Thailand’s governor of The Tourism Authority – Yuthasak Supasorn – who said he wanted to build high quality tourism into Thailand, which essentially means bringing in Americans and Europeans who will spend more money.

According to managing director for Prohibition Partners (a leading cannabis research firm), Daragh Anglim, “From a financial standpoint, as the world’s most populous region, the legalization of cannabis could encourage robust economic growth across the region, buoyed by both local and international demand.”

Conclusion

One thing for sure is that Thailand is jumping right in. Just a few years ago it was illegal to do anything at all with cannabis, and in that general region it mostly still remains that way. In fact, even in Thailand, no decriminalization or legalization measures have been taken for recreational cannabis (though it is being spoken about). So the idea of going from 0 to about 75 is actually pretty impressive, pushed onward, no doubt, by a lagging economy and the economic horror of the Coronavirus pandemic.

It seems Thailand should have no problem pushing through this new amendment and opening up for a greater level of international trade. Whether licenses really will be preferentially given to the Thai over foreign investors still remains to be seen, as does the actual passing of the amendment. Interested investors should keep abreast of legislative changes in the country, and specifications for licensing as they are made clear. It’s hard to say exactly how it’ll go, but Thailand certainly seems to be moving full speed ahead, and in another few years it could even be yet another completely legal country.

Thanks for stopping by CBDtesters.co, where we’re covering everything related to medical cannabis and legal cannabis business. Stop back frequently and subscribe to the Medical Cannabis Weekly Newsletter to keep yourself up-to-date.

RESOURCES:

Synthetic Cannabinoids (Are they synthetic cannabinoids safe?)
The Endocannabinoid System Explained (Why Cannabis Is Good for Our Bodies)
Everything You Need To Know About CBD Isolate (a deep look into hemp extracts)

Cannabinoids 101 – Spotlight on CBN (Cannabinol)
Your Complete Guide to EU GMP-Certified CBD Isolate and Distillate – Spotlight on the regulated EU market

Everything You Need To Know About CBG Isolate
Newest Cannabinoid Powerhouse – CBC – What Can It Do for You?
What is DELTA 8 THC (FAQ: Great resource to learn about DELTA 8THC)
The CBD Flowers Weekly newsletter (your top resource for all things smokable hemp flowers)
The Medical Cannabis Weekly newsletter (International medical cannabis business report)
The Legal Landscape Of CBD Hemp Flower In Europe

The Delta 8 Weekly Newsletter (All you need to know about Delta 8 thc)
Regulators Go After Smokable Hemp Flower – What Does The Future Hold?
The Complex Issue of Marijuana and Hemp Business and Legalization On Tribal Land
Government Assistance Options for U.S. Hemp Farmers Affected By COVID-19

The post Thailand is 1st Asian Country to Legalize Medicinal Cannabis and Enter Global Market appeared first on CBD Testers.

How to choose the best CBD Products to sell in your shop

CBD products are a dime a dozen these days. If you plan to sell these items in your shop, the products you stock will need to be at a certain level of quality to differentiate you from the competition.  

Consumers are tired of mislabeled, snake oil products with crappy ingredients from questionable sources. They are spending their hard-earned money on (often expensive) cannabidiol products, and as a reputable retailer, you intend to provide them with safe, high-quality brands. But what are the criteria here? What do you need to look for when shopping for CBD products to sell in your shop?

To learn more about cannabis, subscribe to the Medical Cannabis Weekly Newsletter


Ingredients

Ingredients are incredibly important. When most people think of CBD products, they are thinking of wellness, and ingredients that don’t reflect that typically don’t bode over well. For example, when sampling some CBD gummies recently, they contained things like high fructose corn syrup, artificial food coloring, and ridiculous amounts of sugar. The only healthy thing about them was the CBD, so basically, it was CBD candy – not a CBD vitamin gummy which is more along the lines of what I was expecting.

Not everyone feels this way, but for me personally, nasty ingredients are a deal breaker, and a growing number of consumers are becoming increasingly concerned with the quality of ingredients in the products they are consuming. And rightfully so; after all, what goes into our bodies is at the root of our overall health and wellness.

Organic is a word that gets thrown around frequently, and although it’s a bit arbitrary considering that organic farming standards vary worldwide, but it highlights an important market need – the need for standardized and regulated, high-quality produce. Organic farming practices include utilizing natural resources while promoting ecological balance and conserving biodiversity.

Another factor to consider is where the ingredients come from. When you’re narrowing down the brands you’re interesting in working with, find out if the company puts importance on ingredient sourcing. In order to prevent time consuming and costly issues, there needs to be some dedication to determining the right ingredient, from the right supplier, at the right cost.

Is it FDA or EMA approved?

This is pretty unlikely, unless you’re working with Epidiolex/Epidyolex. This medication, the very first to be approved by the FDA (Food and Drug Administration) is used to treat seizures due to certain medical conditions (such as Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, Dravet syndrome, tuberous sclerosis complex – TSC). It is not known how this medication works for these seizures. Cannabidiol belongs to a class of drugs known as cannabinoids.

Epidiolex Launch in U.S. Prompts GW Pharmaceuticals Sales Surge

This medication was first approved in the United States under the name Epidiolex. A few years later, it was approved by the EMA (European Medical Agency) under the name Epidyolex – same name slightly different spelling. It is now undergoing clinical trials in Japan.

In the future, we can expect more products to undergo FDA and EMA approval. Especially as big-pharma begins to hone in on the medicinal aspect of the CBD Industry. For example, products sold at major pharmacies such as Walgreens and CVS will likely need to be approved by the FDA.

Research and Clinical Trials

If you want consumers to feel comfortable buying products from your company, you’ll want those that have the research to back up their claims. Although limited, more and more research is becoming available these days and many CBD products are being tested for safety and efficiency. Additionally, you can find market research on many products by companies, like CBD Testers, who conduct thorough product reviews for numerous companies. And this includes physically testing the products.

You can find quite a few legitimate studies from across the globe and the effectiveness of CBD as an individual compound. As you likely already know, CBD can safely and efficiently treat many different conditions including but not limited to: pain, anxiety, depression, epilepsy, insomnia, gastrointestinal issues, and inflammation.

While most of these studies don’t look at specific products (by brand), they do look at different methods of consumption and application. For instance, one study looked at the effects of topically applied CBD on chronic pain management. Many use tinctures and sublingual mixtures in their research. Either way, it gives you an idea of what products are actually good, and why.

GMP (Good Manufacturing Practices)

When a consumer goes to the grocery store and buys a can of soup or box of crackers, there’s an expectation that one they’re buying today is identical to the ones they’ve bought before. This is the idea behind assembly lines and product labels – that each item will have the same amount of component ingredients, in the exact same measurements… every, single, time.

Global GMPs in the World of Legal Cannabis

Of course this doesn’t guarantee quality, but it does ensure uniformity. And in the world of mass production, uniformity is important because it creates a measurable standard for the product. This is what Good Manufacturing Practices (GMPs) refers to.

This concept is becoming increasingly relevant in the cannabis industry, especially when it comes to global products. If you’re trying to appeal to the European market, chances are, you’ll need to ensure that products you sell meet GMP standards. Although the U.S. is lagging in this area (for the time being), this is likely the future of the cannabis industry as a whole.

Brand and Company Info

It may not always matter, it’s not uncommon to find that many investors or business owners are only willing to work with certain brands. And it makes sense. You wouldn’t want your name and reputation linked to a company that has a questionable and unethical history. It looks bad, and ultimately, it’s bad for business.

That’s especially important today, when consumers have access to internet and social media; tools that allow them to discover much more about a brand or company than ever before. Make sure you work with brands that have a good name in the industry.

Final Thoughts

Your exact criteria will vary based on your country. For example, in the United States, you’ll be more inclined to on ingredients and brand awareness over GMPs. Regardless, at the root of it all is quality. When stocking CBD products for your shop, you need to make sure that whatever you’re buying is safe for your consumers – a product they can trust time and time again.

Thanks for stopping by CBD TESTERS, your hub for all things medical cannabis. Stop by regularly and make sure to subscribe to the Medical Cannabis Weekly Newsletter to keep up-to-date on all the most interesting industry topics.

Resources:

The Endocannabinoid System Explained (Why Cannabis Is Good for Our Bodies)
Everything You Need To Know About CBD Isolate (a deep look into hemp extracts)
Cannabinoids 101 – Spotlight on CBN (Cannabinol)
EU GMP Extracts: CBD Isolate, CBD Distillate and CBG IsolateYour Complete Guide to EU GMP-Certified CBD Isolate and Distillate – Spotlight on the regulated EU market
Everything You Need To Know About CBG Isolate

EU GMP-Certified Cannabinoid Isolates and Distillates ExplainedNewest Cannabinoid Powerhouse – CBC – What Can It Do for You?
DELTA 8 THC Newsletter (The DELTA 8 THC Weekly Newsletter)
The CBD Flowers Weekly newsletter (your top resource for all things smokable hemp flowers)
The Medical Cannabis Weekly newsletter (International medical cannabis business report)
The Legal Landscape Of CBD Hemp Flower In Europe

Effective Immediately – Most Delta 8 THC Is Now ILLEGAL in The United States (Understanding the latest announcement by the DEA)
Hemp-Derived DELTA 8 THC Products Now Available Online (Understanding the difference between hemp-derived Delta 8 products, to isolate-made products)
Synthetic Cannabinoids (Are they synthetic cannabinoids safe?)Regulators Go After Smokable Hemp Flower – What Does The Future Hold?The Complex Issue of Cannabis and Hemp Business On Tribal Land
Government Assistance Options for U.S. Hemp Farmers Affected By COVID-19

EU Novel Food and The Legal Status of CBD Oil

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