Friday, February 28, 2020 Headlines | Marijuana Today Daily News

Marijuana Today Daily Headlines
Friday, February 28, 2020 | Curated by host Shea Gunther

// USDA Announces Two Temporary Changes To Restrictive Hemp Rules (Marijuana Moment)

// In major shift, UN drug chief questions whether control treaties involving cannabis are out of date (Marijuana Business Daily)

// Vermont farmers concerned by cannabis bill provisions (WCAX 3 CBS)


These headlines are brought to you by MJToday Media, publishers of this podcast as well as our weekly show Marijuana Today and the most-excellent Green Rush Podcast. And check out our new show Weed Wonks!


// Mass. Cities And Towns Demand Large Payouts From Marijuana Companies (WGBH 89.7)

// What marijuana companies can learn from federal legalization of hemp (Marijuana Business Daily)

// Colorado’s First Marijuana Tasting Room to Open on 4/20 (Wikileaf)

// Alcohol is killing more Americans than ever. Here’s how to save them (Leafly)

// Marijuana and the NBA: Erasing the stigma and healing the league (NBC Sports)

// Massachusetts May Tax Black Market Weed Dealers Instead of Fining Them (Merry Jane)

// More Than 80% of Denver Teens Don’t Smoke Weed, New Study Says (Merry Jane)


Check out our other projects:
Marijuana Today— Our flagship title, a weekly podcast examining the world of marijuana business and activism with some of the smartest people in the industry and movement.
Marijuana Media Connect— A service that connects industry insiders in the legal marijuana industry with journalists, bloggers, and writers in need of expert sources for their stories.

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Friday, February 28, 2020 Headlines | Marijuana Today Daily NewsPhoto: Oregon Department of Agriculture/Flickr

The Complex Issue of Cannabis Business On Tribal Land

Throughout history, cannabis was regulated by federal law on reservations, so it was generally illegal. But after the 2013 Cole Memo, the topic of cannabis on tribal land and how it ties into the tribe’s government autonomy became increasingly prevalent.

Tribal land is considered sovereign territory, meaning that the land is independently governed by the tribe. They do have to adhere to many federal regulations but are independent from state control. That being said, there is a lot of flexibility when it comes to legalizing cannabis on tribal land, although some are still weary about doing it, especially those living in prohibition states.

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From Casinos to Cannabis

Since Indian gaming was legalized in 1988, there has been a massive expansion of Native American casinos in the United States. This has had a tremendous economical and societal impact on reservations across the country. It seems that cannabis entrepreneurship on tribal land may follow the same path.

As states continue to legalize cannabis to some extent, and federal laws become laxer on the subject, many tribes are considering the business opportunities that cannabis can bring them. Many tribes that live in legal states have begun growing, either medical/recreational cannabis or industrial hemp. They’re distributing, selling, and event producing some of their own oils and infused-products.

Because of the conflicts
that can arise when governing sovereign territory, there is often a lot of confusion
in this area. Many tribes are conducting extensive feasibility research to
determine whether cannabis could be a realistic option for them.

The Wilkinson Memo: A “Hands-Off” Approach to Tribal Cannabis Regulation

In October 2014, the Wilkinson Memorandum, a policy regarding how to regulate cannabis in native territory, was born out of inspiration from the Cole Memo.

”The eight priorities in the Cole Memorandum will guide United States Attorneys’ marijuana enforcement efforts in Indian Country, including in the event that sovereign Indian Nations seek to legalize the cultivation or use of marijuana in Indian Country,” the Wilkinson memo reads.

The CBD Flowers Business Newsletter

Just like the Cole Memo says that the Department of Justice should not interfere with state-regulated medical and recreational cannabis programs, the Wilkinson memo applies that same logic to sovereign tribal land. Federal attorneys have yet to comment directly about the Wilkinson memo, and they still aren’t too keen on the idea of tribes opening up to the industry. Cannabis-related events in particular seem to have the feds on edge.

Public Law 280

Public Law 280 was a transfer of legal jurisdiction from the federal government to state governments which gave some states authority over tribal land. In total, six states have enacted Public Law 280: California, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Nebraska, Oregon, and Alaska. Many other states also have partial authority over reservations, such as South Dakota, Idaho, Arizona, Iowa, Utah, Florida and North Dakota.

When talking cannabis, Public Law 280 can greatly complicate things for
tribes considering implementing a program if they’re within a prohibition
state. Only local enforcement will be something to consider though, law
enforcement from neighboring states won’t be an issue, even if they’re right on
the border of an anti-weed state.

List of Tribes that already have, or plan to in the future, update their
cannabis laws

Flandreau Santee Sioux (South Dakota): This is quite possibly the most outspoken tribe in the US. The tribe announced their plans to build an “Adult Playground”, basically America’s very first, all-inclusive, cannabis resort. It would have really made South Dakota a much more appealing vacation spot, but sadly those plans went up in smoke. Shortly after a large raid on another tribe’s (Menominee) land, the Flandreau Santee Sioux destroyed all their crops and decided to hold off on the idea for the time being.

The Menominee Indian Tribe (Wisconsin): A well-publicized 2015 raid left the Menominee Indian reservation sans 30,000 cannabis plants they were using for hemp research after feds stated the THC levels were above 0.3%. A federal judge also stated that since marijuana was illegal in Wisconsin, the tribe wasn’t allowed to grow it and authorities were within their rights. That’s Public Law 280 in action.

The Passamaquoddy Tribe (Maine): The tribe now has a permit to grow industrial hemp in Maine. According to Diana Nelson, spokeswoman for Quoddy Hemp Manufacturing LLC, “ the company has obtained seeds from Kentucky and the Passamaquoddy Tribe is researching what kinds of hemp might grow best in northern New England.”

The Paiute Tribe (Nevada): The Paiutes have partnered with a company called Ultra Health to build some sort of medical marijuana conglomerate on their land. It’s to include two dispensaries, a production building, three greenhouses each larger than a football field, and a huge storage warehouse.

Shoshone Tribe (Oregon): The Fort McDermitt Paiute and Shoshone Tribe of Nevada and Oregon will be growing cannabis on its reservation specifically for medical use and research.

Suquamish Tribe (Washington): Cannabis has been legalized on Suquamish land and they are working out the final details.

The Squaxin Island Tribe (Washington): Squaxin Island Tribe’s reservation in Mason County owns the first tribal-owned recreational  cannabis store in the country.

The Navajo Tribe (New Mexico, Arizona, Utah): The Navajo are partnering with CannaNative to grow industrial hemp on their lands. They plan on the hemp farm being in New Mexico, where industrial hemp production is not yet legal. They can grow it on their lands regardless, but it would be much less complicated if it wasn’t prohibited.

Final Thoughts

Just like anywhere, cannabis is a very lucrative financial option tribes.
Not only does it create many new jobs, but it could possibly be one of the last
remaining options for tribes that are on land with scarce resources or unable
to open a casino and host tourists.

In this industry, the unexpected is to be expected, so tribes need to be patient and prepared if they’re going to launch themselves into the business. They will be facing many of the same issues state-licensed cannabis businesses are currently dealing with due to state, federal, and now tribal, law discrepancies.

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Wednesday, February 26, 2020 Headlines | Marijuana Today Daily News

Marijuana Today Daily Headlines
Wednesday, February 26, 2020 | Curated by host Shea Gunther

// Presidential Candidates Clash Over Marijuana Legalization At Democratic Debate (Marijuana Moment)

// Massachusetts Regulators Warn That More Pot Shops Mean More Weed on the Streets (Merry Jane)

// Smokable Hemp Bill Heads To Virginia Governor’s Desk And Lawmakers Approve Legal Marijuana Study (Marijuana Moment)


These headlines are brought to you by MJToday Media, publishers of this podcast as well as our weekly show Marijuana Today and the most-excellent Green Rush Podcast. And check out our new show Weed Wonks!


// Mexican Senate Committees Meeting This Week To Finalize Marijuana Legalization Plan (Marijuana Moment)

// Eaze Raises $35 Million As Company Pivots To Plant Touching (Green Market Report)

// Paraguay issues first 12 medical cannabis production licenses (Marijuana Business Daily)

// Chart: Montana medical marijuana patient count continues rapid growth (Marijuana Business Daily)

// How old do you need to be to legally sell cannabis? In Canada it depends on where you live (Growth Op)

// Pennsylvania approves four firms to grow cannabis for research (Marijuana Business Daily)

// GW Pharma Generates $109 Million Revenue in Q4 (New Cannabis Ventures)


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Marijuana Today— Our flagship title, a weekly podcast examining the world of marijuana business and activism with some of the smartest people in the industry and movement.
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Photo: CBS News

Prepackaged Hemp and Cannabis Flower – Safer For Consumers, Business, and the Environment

When it comes to the cannabis and hemp
industries, anything that can help make things safer and more legitimate is
always welcomed and frankly, necessary.

Aside from appealing to your consumer
base, proper packaging is also a major factor in staying complaint with local
regulations. Regardless of where you’re selling your hemp or cannabis flowers, whether
it’s in the U.S., Canada, Europe, etc.; it’s highly likely your intended market
will have some type of packaging and distribution laws you need to abide by.

Plus, this doesn’t mean your packaging
has to be boring. On the contrary, these new regulations have led to an upswing
in creative and stylish, high-quality packaging. Many companies are crafting child-resistant
jars out of glass, wood, and metal, in a variety of shapes, sizes and colors. They’re
actually a great marketing too – Honestly, there’s been quite a few times that
cool packaging was the deciding factor for me when I couldn’t choose between
dispensaries.

That said, let’s take a closer look at the importance of properly prepackaged cannabis and hemp flowers.

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Safer for Consumers, Businesses, and
The Environment

First, we’ll cover patient safety, as that’s always the most important aspect of offering any medicinal product. It goes without saying that if a product (hemp or cannabis flowers in this case) is prepackaged immediately following harvest, or right after being tested in a lab, there is a much smaller chance of it becoming contaminated by the time it reaches the patient.

While you may not think this is a
rampant issue in our industry, you’d be surprised to learn otherwise. Mold is a
very common problem with buds that aren’t properly packaged, and some of these
mold spores are dangerous to human health and undetectable by the naked eye.

At the end of last year, lab results
from 25 randomly selected Denver-area dispensaries were released. Out of the 25
stores, 20 of them (or 80 percent) were selling flower that was contaminated
with mold or yeast. “There are many different reasons why products may
show up on the sale shelf contaminated,” said Abby Davidson, the food and
marijuana safety manager at the Denver Department of Public Health and
Environment (DDPHE).

“It’s not that the dispensary that it
was sent to had any hand, possibly, in contaminating the product. Or it could
be that there were processes that happened after cultivation that maybe
would’ve led to contamination. It’s really hard to point any fingers until
we’re able to do our investigation and backtrack to how that product got to
that dispensary.”

Issues with liability (for dispensary and shop owners at least) are less likely to arise should a patient fall ill after smoking flower from your inventory. The seller can simply point to the fact that they bought their hemp or cannabis flower in prepackaged, tamper-proof containers and investigators will back off and look further down the supply chain.

And last but certainly not least, this
packaging craze is also serving the environment well. I can’t tell you how many
small plastic, pop-top jars I accumulated before California upgraded their
cannabis packaging laws (hundreds). I collected and recycled mine, but many
people were more careless, and these ended up as plastic waste. High-quality,
reusable jars made from glass, metal, or wood are a vast improvement in my
book.

Golden State Regulations

The California cannabis market is the
largest in the world, and they have some of the most stringent packaging laws
as well. In January of last year, the California Department of Public Health fully
implemented these new regulations that they had been working on for a year prior.

The law is extremely detailed and, of
course, open for updates in this constantly-changing industry. But here are the
basic guidelines that cannabis and hemp companies will need to follow:

  • Smokable cannabis
    and hemp flower must be prepackaged at the lab where it was tested for
    cannabinoids and contaminants.
  • As a product that
    has age-requirements and is still federally illegal, cannabis and hemp flower
    must be prepackaged in child resistant jars.
  • For consumer
    safety and peace of mind, cannabis and hemp flower must be sold in tamper-proof
    packaging.
  • If the product
    can be used multiple times, it must be sold in resealable packaging.

Most legal markets have their own packaging
laws on the books, and although they might vary slightly, the over gist is the
same across the board: lab tested, child resistant, and tamper proof.

Why They’re Good For Business

Why are prepackaged buds in high-quality glass jars an important
addition to your dispensary or online shop? Well there are numerous reasons for
that, starting with product freshness and safety. As mentioned above, with prepackaged
flowers coming directly from a farm or lab, the risk of moldy, contaminated,
imperfect product is greatly diminished.  

These buds will also be fresher, as most of these prepackaged hemp and cannabis buds are stored in jars or pouches that can regulate the humidity to an extent. If your product arrives in a prepackaged and airtight container, the buds will be intact and won’t get smashed and deformed during shipment either.

Another major reason is, of course,
aesthetics. Glass jars look good, they last long, and they’re what the
sophisticated hemp consumer of today is searching for. It’s been proven that
nice packaging can improve your brand and boost sales. As a consumer myself,
I’m a sucker for cool packaging and I’d be lying if I said that I never chose
certain dispensaries over others because I liked the jars they were selling.

And
last but definitely not least important, ease and convenience. Instead of
having to source the packaging yourself, compare prices, make sure everything
is compliant and has all the important features, and jump through any other
hoops – why not just buy the flowers already packaged, slap a nice label on the
jar and call it a day?

Our Deal For You

This week, we have an excellent deal for prepackaged jars of hemp flowers. For access to this deal, subscribe to the CBD Flowers Business Newsletter and check your inbox Thursday, at 11am EST. You can also contact us directly at info@cbdtesters.co if you have any questions.

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DOT Not Taking CBD as Excuse for Failed Drug Test

On Feb. 19 the U.S. Department of Transportation clarified its stance that it does not test for CBD, but stated it will continue to penalize workers for THC.

Within a noticeDOT, which sets regulations for safety-sensitive employees such as transit vehicle operators and aircraft maintenance personnel, noted that while the Farm Bill removed hemp from the Controlled Substances Act, it did not except marijuana. This means hemp-derived CBD products with a THC concentration of less than 0.3% are not controlled substances. But any product, including those labeled as CBD, that breaks that THC limit is still a controlled substance.

With the legalization of hemp, DOT said they have received multiple inquiries about whether DOT-regulated safety-sensitive employees can use CBD products. They don’t want to get caught up in the testing protocols structures established after the 1991 Omnibus Transportation Employee Testing Act. The bill required all of the agencies under DOT’s regulatory umbrella to come up with a plan for drug and alcohol testing for safety-sensitive transportation employees.

“This includes pilots, school bus drivers, truck drivers, train engineers, transit vehicle operators, aircraft maintenance personnel, fire-armed transit security personnel, ship captains, and pipeline emergency response personnel, among others,” DOT noted in the announcement.

There were three main points DOT emphasized. The first is that they require testing for “marijuana and not CBD.” While CBD is present in both marijuana and hemp, what defines a plant as hemp is the presence of less than .3% of CBD. The second point was about the actual quality of the CBD marketplace right now.

“The labeling of many CBD products may be misleading because the products could contain higher levels of THC than what the product label states,” The notice reads. “The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) does not currently certify the levels of THC in CBD products, so there is no Federal oversight to ensure that the labels are accurate.

“The FDA has cautioned the public that: ‘Consumers should beware purchasing and using any [CBD] products.’ The FDA has stated: ‘It is currently illegal to market CBD by adding it to a food or labeling it as a dietary supplement.’ Also, the FDA has issued several warning letters to companies because their products contained more CBD than indicated on the product label.”

DOT’s final point was that CBD use is not a legitimate medical explanation for a laboratory-confirmed THC positive result.

“Therefore, Medical Review Officers will verify a drug test confirmed at the appropriate cutoffs as positive, even if an employee claims they only used a CBD product.” CBD products could lead to all the problems that would come with a failed drug test and DOT recommends people exercise caution when considering whether to use CBD products. DOT also said the announcement was meant to provide clarity to the public on existing requirements under the law or agency policies.

The DOT set its policies on recreational marijuana in the wake of the first states legalizing in December 2012. Back then, they wanted to make sure everyone knew what happened in Colorado and Washington had zero impact on the agency.

“Therefore, Medical Review Officers (MROs) will not verify a drug test as negative based upon learning that the employee used ‘recreational marijuana’ when states have passed ‘recreational marijuana’ initiatives,” the compliance notice reads. “We also firmly reiterate that an MRO will not verify a drug test negative based upon information that a physician recommended that the employee use ‘medical marijuana’ when states have passed ‘medical marijuana’ initiatives.”

In September 2019 at the Montreal Council on Foreign Relations, U.S. Secretary of Transportation Elaine L. Chao noted the new rift between the U.S. and Canada when it came to pot during her speech.

“Traditionally, our two countries’ approach to road and automobile safety have been aligned,” Chao said. “Let me note an emerging challenge, however. As safety advocates know so well, alcohol and drugs play a disproportionate role in auto fatalities. Canada has legalized the recreational use of marijuana, while the United States has not. It is still illegal under U.S. federal law, although nine states have decriminalized it. While there is still much research to be done, data from states that have legalized is already pointing to the dangers of driving under the influence of both illicit and legal drugs.”

Chao did confuse legalization and decriminalization though as 25 states have some form of marijuana decriminalization on the books.

TELL US, have you ever had to take a drug test for work?

The post DOT Not Taking CBD as Excuse for Failed Drug Test appeared first on Cannabis Now.

Monday, February 24, 2020 Headlines | Marijuana Today Daily News

Marijuana Today Daily Headlines
Monday, February 24, 2020 | Curated by host Shea Gunther

// Elizabeth Warren Has A New Plan For Legalizing Marijuana (Marijuana Moment)

// Licensing appeals overwhelm Missouri’s medical marijuana program, point to widespread MJ industry concern about scoring fairness (Marijuana Business Daily)

// Vape crisis forced cannabis sector to increase focus on technology, testing, and transparency (Marijuana Business Daily)


These headlines are brought to you by Green Worx Consults, a company specializing in project management, workflow mapping and design, and Lean & 6 Sigma process. If you could use help making your business better at business, get in touch with Green Worx Consults.


// House Candidate Gives Marijuana To Voters At ‘First-Ever Congressional Weed Party’ (Marijuana Moment)

// Guidance issued for advertising marijuana products in Maine (Portland Press Herald)

// Legal Pot Sales in Canada Rise 8% in December (Motley Fool)

// Reynolds says she’s comfortable with board recs on medical marijuana (Radio Iowa)

// Secret U.S. document shows Canadians who use legal cannabis ‘not eligible’ for Nexus program (Growth Op)

// Medical Schools Aren’t Teaching Their Students About Cannabis, Survey Finds (Merry Jane)

// Federal Reserve Sends Reminder That Hemp Businesses Can Get Bank Accounts (Marijuana Moment)


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Marijuana Today— Our flagship title, a weekly podcast examining the world of marijuana business and activism with some of the smartest people in the industry and movement.
Marijuana Media Connect— A service that connects industry insiders in the legal marijuana industry with journalists, bloggers, and writers in need of expert sources for their stories.

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Photo: Gage Skidmore/Flickr

Hemp, Cannabis, and the United States Postal Service

During the middle of last year, the
United States Postal Service (USPS) updated its “Hazardous, Restricted, and
Perishable Mail” policy to include new standards for mailing cannabis and hemp-based
products, following the passage of the 2018 Farm Bill.

It’s one of the best and most reliable ways to ship products, but many people still aren’t sure if shipping hemp and cannabis is legal, and quite frankly, it makes some business owners nervous. Luckily, the USPS has updated its long-standing policies against hemp and cannabis products, and since June 2019, they will gladly ship these products across the U.S. (and internationally in some cases) as long as the proper paperwork is included.

According to their website, “Over the past several months, the Postal Service has received numerous inquiries from commercial entities and individuals wishing to use the mail to transport cannabidiol (CBD) oil and various other products derived from the cannabis plant.”

“In response,” the memo continued, “The Postal Service recently circulated an internal policy outlining specific acceptance criteria for CBD and cannabis-based products. In order to provide more clarity for mailers, the Postal Service is now issuing external guidelines, which clarify the circumstances under which hemp and hemp-based products can be mailed in domestic mail.”

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Hemp vs. Cannabis

Although these plants both come from the plant species, there hare some significant difference between hemp and cannabis. Hemp, on the other hand, is classified as having less than 0.3 percent THC (tetrahydocannabinol) content and often used for more industrial purposes. Some hemp plants grow flowers similar to cannabis, but they contain only trace amounts of THC and no other psychoactive compounds. Most hemp plants are CBD-dominant, although an increasingly popular alternative is CBG-dominant buds.

Cannabis flowers, on the other hand, have all the cannabinoids including THC, and is what you will often what you’d find in a medical cannabis dispensaries and recreational stores. Because they have THC, they do produce psychoactive effects and thus, are illegal. The intensity of these effects varies based on how much is consumed, the THC content in the strain that’s being used, and individual tolerance levels.

What You Need to Know About Shipping Hemp and Cannabis

So let’s take a look at some of these guidelines. First and foremost, any business that wants to ship hemp and cannabis products through the USPS must have a license from their respective state’s Department of Agriculture. Second, any product shipped must have less than 0.3 percent THC, and there needs to be correct paperwork included to verify the cannabinoid content.

It’s up to the individual company or business owner to make
sure they’re complying with all the laws and regulations that govern U.S. mail.
If these rules aren’t followed, the USPS can seize your shipment. It’s also a
federal crime to mail illegal products, so criminal prosecution is also a
possibility.

According to Lex Pelger, director of education at cannabis-production
company CV Sciences, this move by USPS is on par with the normalization of the
hemp and cannabis industries. As these plants and the products manufactured
with their compounds become increasingly mainstream, government entities have to
find ways to compromise and adapt.

“I think this is a big deal,” Pelger said in an interview with Cannabis Business Times. “That’s really important, to have these kinds of clarifications, to have the USPS say, ‘This is completely legal.’ It does matter, and you see other agencies following suit in their various departments.”

A Closer Look at the Text

These updates to mailable products cover everything from oil to topicals, and even smokable flowers, granted all these products fall into the guidelines listed above. More specifically, this is what the USPS has to say about shipping hemp and cannabis products:

“Hemp and hemp-based products, including cannabidiol (CBD) with
the tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) concentration of such hemp (or its derivatives)
not exceeding a 0.3 percent limit are permitted to be mailed only when:

  • The mailer complies with all applicable federal, state, and local laws (such as the Agricultural Act of 2014 and the Agricultural Improvement Act of 2018) pertaining to hemp production, processing, distribution, and sales; and
  • The mailer retains records establishing compliance with such laws, including laboratory test results, licenses, or compliance reports, for no less than 2 years after the date of mailing.”

Government Agencies Adopting New Policies

Also last year, the Transportation Security Administration (TSA), changed its policies and now allows travelers to fly with certain types of cannabis and hemp-based products. Keep in mind though, you always want to present your item at the security gate to make sure everything is on the level, but now let’s get back to the topic at hand.

“Because they’re such a normalized product and they just simply look like another plant extract, in general, it doesn’t seem like it’s raising red flags,” Pelger mentioned in regards to mailing CBD oil. “Often, I would suspect people don’t even know or care what’s in there. It doesn’t seem like they’re looking for it.”

But some people still aren’t
convinced, and it’s not just companies and those doing the shipping that have worries,
many consumers are fearful of having these types of products shipped to their
homes.

“When I’m out on the road, I hear a lot of elderly folks, especially, being worried about this being shipped to their house, being worried about legality, being worried about their insurance companies,” Pelger said.

“To have a statement like this to let them rest easy … means there are going to be a lot more grandmothers or parents around the country who are finally going to feel safe enough to buy a hemp extract online and have it shipped to their house. And that could be a really important thing for their health.”

Facing Challenges

While this is obviously a good thing, there are still some issues arising for certain companies that will hopefully be addressed in the near future. “What the USPS actually said is kind of confusing and doesn’t quite make sense with how some of the industry works because for some companies, like ours,” says Pelger.

“We don’t have a license from any local department of agriculture because none of our hemp is grown in the United States. We’re using only Dutch hemp, and so we don’t need to deal with the USDA for growing hemp. So, we wouldn’t have a license from them, and it’s something that’s required,” he continued.

Another problem is that some of the states that have harsh regulations against cannabis and hemp products will often seize perfectly legal packages that come through their states. What should be a simple mishap once the lab results are reviewed usually ends up being a months long back-and-forth between the police department and the business owner who is trying to get their products back.

Final Thoughts

Despite the challenges with shipping hemp and cannabis, this USPS memo provides some much needed clarity where there has historically been no valuable information to go on. It’s definitely a step in the right direction, and if cannabis is legalized nationwide in the coming years, it will eliminate many of the issues that arise when shipping legal cannabinoid-based products.

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The post Hemp, Cannabis, and the United States Postal Service appeared first on CBD Testers.

Friday, February 21, 2020 Headlines | Marijuana Today Daily News

Marijuana Today Daily Headlines
Friday, February 21, 2020 | Curated by host Shea Gunther

// New Hampshire House Approves Marijuana Legalization Bill (Marijuana Moment)

// Kentucky House Approves Medical Marijuana Legalization Bill (Marijuana Moment)

// USDA Approves Hemp Plans For Washington State And Wyoming (Marijuana Moment)


These headlines are brought to you by Green Worx Consults, a company specializing in project management, workflow mapping and design, and Lean & 6 Sigma process. If you could use help making your business better at business, get in touch with Green Worx Consults.


// Missouri faces complaints over how it licensed marijuana businesses. So who won? (St. Louis Today)

// NFL Would End Marijuana Suspensions In Deal Circulated By Players Union (Forbes)

// Harvest expands medical cannabis market reach by buying Arizona rival (Marijuana Business Daily)

// Peru sells out of medical cannabis (Marijuana Business Daily)

// Australia claims it has enough cannabis flower to meet demand, but industry says otherwise (Marijuana Business Daily)

// Australis ends purchase of Colorado CBD firm after lurid charges emerge (Marijuana Business Daily)

// New York Governor Will Visit Legal Marijuana States To Take Lessons Back Home (Marijuana Moment)


Check out our other projects:
Marijuana Today— Our flagship title, a weekly podcast examining the world of marijuana business and activism with some of the smartest people in the industry and movement.
Marijuana Media Connect— A service that connects industry insiders in the legal marijuana industry with journalists, bloggers, and writers in need of expert sources for their stories.

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Photo: Coleen Danger/Flickr

Thursday, February 20, 2020 Headlines | Marijuana Today Daily News

Marijuana Today Daily Headlines
Thursday, February 20, 2020 | Curated by host Shea Gunther

// Colorado Sold $1.75 Billion in Weed Last Year Exceeding All Expectations (Merry Jane)

// USDA Touts Hemp Industry’s Growth But Says Challenges Remain (Marijuana Moment)

// Alabama Lawmakers Approve Medical Marijuana Legalization Bill (Marijuana Moment)


These headlines are brought to you by Curaleaf, one of the leading vertically-integrated cannabis operators in the U.S. With legal medical marijuana dispensaries, cultivation sites, and processing facilities all over the United States, Curaleaf has served more than 165,000 medical cannabis patients and looks forward to helping many more long into the future. Swing over to Curaleaf.com to learn more about this very cool company!


// Virginia Marijuana Decriminalization Gets Closer To Governor’s Desk With New Amendments (Marijuana Moment)

// Most of Pennsylvania’s Medical Cannabis Patients Pay Over $200 a Month for Weed (Merry Jane)

// Is the Price of Legal Weed Going to Be Way Too Expensive in 2020? (Merry Jane)

// Legal marijuana use still costs people jobs. A new California bill takes on the issue (LA Times)

// New Utah Bill Lets Employers Discriminate Against Medical Marijuana Patients (Merry Jane)

// The buzz on Utah’s fledgling medical cannabis program (Leafly)

// At this high school apparently weed is okay- but only if you’re white (Leafly)


Check out our other projects:
Marijuana Today— Our flagship title, a weekly podcast examining the world of marijuana business and activism with some of the smartest people in the industry and movement.
Marijuana Media Connect— A service that connects industry insiders in the legal marijuana industry with journalists, bloggers, and writers in need of expert sources for their stories.

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Photo: mrBunin/Flickr