Christina P Knows the Secret to Dirty Humor

Comedian Christina Pazsitzky—known professionally as Christina P—is no stranger to the time management game. When we connect by phone, she’s juggling her obligations to her husband (fellow comedian, Tom Segura), her kids, the dogs, and her career—all of which require time, energy, and attention. Desiring some “mom” time, her son interrupts the beginning of the conversation, and Pazsitzky politely explains, “I have to do this interview. I’ll come talk to you, give me a half an hour.”

The interaction is just one example of how the co-host of the hugely successful podcast Your Mom’s House—which she hosts with Segura—is able to wear many hats and handle a variety of different responsibilities, all which can be managed with time. “Everything is planned, everything is on schedule, and you give everything time. You give marriage time. You give your children time, you give [your career] time. And then you give yourself time.”

With her new Netflix one-hour special Mom Genes which released on May 8, Pazsitzky is particularly enthused to be speaking with High Times—having grown up in Los Angeles, where the magazine played a huge role developing San Fernando Valley culture. Over the course of our conversation, Pazsitzky reveals her strategies for maintaining balance between work and home life, her back-in-the-day affinity for White Widow, and why true happiness is linked to not giving a fuck and carving your own path.

Christina Pazsitzky: Can I just say for the record how stoked I am to be giving an interview to High Times? One of the first boys I was obsessed with in high school had an issue of High Times in his room and I thought he was the absolute coolest. He also had a VHS tape of Howard Stern’s Butt Bongo Fiesta. I was in love.

High Times: A guy having High Times magazine gave him a lot of street cred in your eyes at that time.

Of course. Also, [he] was forbidden fruit because it was my friend’s older brother. And you know, you can’t make out with your friend’s older brother—and we never did—but back then, this was the early ’90s when weed wasn’t legal. I remember thinking, “This guy is a real renegade. Pictures of weed? What?” It kind of blew my mind.

Amidst enjoying the company of your friend’s older brother—in a PG way—did you ever think the comedic path was something you’d embark upon?

I never thought in my wildest dreams I would have the career that I do now, mostly because the internet and podcasting never existed—though I knew I wanted to make a living somehow being myself. I also knew I loved jokes.

My parents were Hungarian, and every Sunday my dad would have these barbeque parties and all of the old Hungarians would come around. Guys who were missing knuckles on their fingers—carpenters and hardcore blue-collar Eastern Europeans who would stand around and sling jokes. As a little girl, I was like, “Dude, there’s something magical in telling a joke.” These were heavy dudes who escaped a communist country, yet something powerful with humor was happening.

There were these joke books when I was a kid called Truly Tasteless Jokes, and I would memorize dead baby jokes, blonde jokes, Jew jokes—they were all categorized by race and were horribly inappropriate by today’s standards—and I would repeat those jokes at school in third grade. I didn’t even know what the racial stuff was—I had to ask my dad later—but I loved the timing and the power of knowing something that the grownups knew.

Hence my love for Howard Stern very early. I started listening to Howard because I worked at my dad’s shop—he was a forklift mechanic—and I started listening when I was 13 years old during the summer. To hear dirty humor—it was a secret of what the adults were talking about. Then when you get to an age when you start to understand it, it’s like, “I know the code, dude!”

It sounds like you had a fascination, curiosity, and understanding of comedy and how comedy can be a filament between you and the adult world.

I was also kind of a weirdo growing up. During recess, the kids would be playing and I would be laying across the monkey bars just kind of thinking about stuff. I think there was always an antisocial element to me—I was never a cheerleader, I was a goth—so I loved being on the outside. I just had to figure out how to put that into something creative.

Photo by JD Swiger

Was there a moment that served as a jumping-off point where you realized comedy was something you could pursue rather than simply participate in?

What happened was, instead of getting funny in high school and in college, I turned goth, and I got real dark. But with comedy, it’s tragedy plus time, right? So I was horribly tragic. From the time I was 13 to 21, I wore black and stayed out of the sun. I was so fucking depressed.

I had a degree in philosophy when I graduated from school, which was so fucking useless, and when I was 22, I went to go work for this lovely man named Chris Abrego. Chris goes, “Christina, you’re the worst employee I’ve ever had, but you’re also the funniest. Have you thought about doing comedy? Go to The Groundlings.” So I started at The Groundlings and was innately decent at comedy, but then thought to myself that I didn’t want to pretend to be in a fucking donut shop. All of those years of brooding, I had something to say. I started stand-up at 23 or 26 and then I never looked back.

What gave you the confidence and the awareness to lean into yourself, not give a fuck, and do what you had to do to have the career you’ve had?

Anything worth doing is awful. Awful and amazing. Just know that when you choose to create a path or you choose a path that your parents won’t approve of and people will talk shit to you—just know that that path will be harder. But it’s so worthwhile. It is so much better in the long run, and that’s mastery. It’s 10 years. It’s 10,000 hours. It’s The Beatles going to Hamburg and playing in a dump until they get good. And that’s the fun part.

Even when you’re successful in stand-up, you have to keep at it. Everything requires work, so you have to figure out what you want to dedicate your energy to. Just make sure you really enjoy it. You’re going to fail, you’re going to succeed, you’re going to fail—so you might as well pick something that fires you up. Looking back, I kind of unconsciously sabotaged myself. I failed so hard at everything else.

I got into law school and then dropped out after two weeks. I got into graduate school for philosophy and then I quit after a semester. I had 22 jobs in four years in every field I’d been remotely interested in and had either been fired or quit. So I tried everything and then disappointed my parents and fucked my life up so much that there was no going back. There were no exits. So it was either [comedy] or nothing.

Thank God I married Tom Segura because Tommy really pushed me and kept me on the path, and we both did it at the same time. I’m so thankful for him and he and I going through it together. Having a partner to be poor with—we were so poor when we got married, we had $200. We were both broke-ass comics, but we were like, “Fuck it, we’re going to do it. We’re going to do this, dude, failure is not an option.” When your back’s against the wall, homie, you do it.

And thank God for pot, by the way. I know people don’t call it “pot” anymore, but seriously, shout-out to White Widow in 2009 [laughs]. That bitch kept me creative when I was so full of anxiety. If I didn’t have weed in ’08 or ’09, where would I be today?

Third grade was the first time I got high actually. I ate pot brownies by accident at a pool party. It was opening day at the ‘84 Olympics and I fell asleep, and when I woke up, my mom had made me all of these barbeque chicken wings. I was like, “These are the best wings ever, thank you!”

Did people know you were high?

This chick in our apartment complex brought pot brownies to the swimming pool party that everybody was at. I ate one and jumped in the pool. I ate two and jumped in the pool. I ate three—and by the third one, this lady was like, “Oh, you should tell your kid to stop eating those.” It was the ’80s, bro, it was the ’80s. So my mom just took me home. I remember laying on the couch, I watched the opening ceremony to the ’84 Olympics and then I guess I fell asleep. It wasn’t traumatic at all. I guess it must have been an indica.

Is there any strain that currently helps you with your creativity or creative process?

I take CBD at night to calm me down—I love CBD. For weed, I’ll take tinctures, and I’ll get so high because I’m very impatient. I’ll take a drop and be like, “Dude, nothing is happening.” Then four hours later, I’m like, “Oh my God, I’m having a stroke!”

Someone at The Comedy Store gave me some super powerful liquid and I thought it was just CBD without anything in it. I was like drippity drop, here’s another dose, and woke up at three in the morning like, “Tom, I’m having a stroke!” [Laughs] He’s like, “Well, did you take anything?” And I was like, “Just this CBD I got from The Comedy Store.” And he’s like, “Babe, that’s the most powerful stuff.” So I tend to take CBD without THC in it, and that really, really helps.

Speaking of Tom, what was the formula for successfully maintaining your relationship with him and putting in the necessary time and energy into your career?

For the career, I studied people I admired and I studied their path. I was obsessed with Phyllis Diller, I was obsessed with this book called “The Magic of Believing,” I was obsessed with Napoleon Hill, Tony Robbins, Deepak Chopra—you name it, I read it.

For Tom and I—and it sounds so obnoxious—it was never work for us. It’s never been work. We’re very compatible. I think comedy kept us together, a love for the same pursuit. The thing that kept us bonded was Your Mom’s House because we were both on the road grinding the weeks out, but then once a week, we had to meet and do the [podcast]. In that thing that we did together, we’d recap each other’s week and we found the lane that we both existed on, which was Your Mom’s House. Maybe that’s the thing—the glue. [Tom] and I are just wired similarly.

I think that’s the secret to a good relationship—find somebody whose priorities are similar and their wiring is similar. Like we’re psychotic, dude. We’ll do by any means necessary to get here, and we did.

It sounds like you guys understand and appreciate each other so you can help the other lean into who they are and who they need to be.

One-hundred percent. I’ve always been someone who is driven and credit to Tom—I was with boys before who were such fucking losers that they would be like, “I can’t be with you because you’re this or that.” I studied at Oxford and had a boyfriend who was like, “I can’t be with you because you’re too smart.” I was like, “Fuck you, dude.”

Tom is so special in that he’s always wanted me to achieve and he’s always helped and been behind that. That’s a really secure human being.

It’s funny, I know what makes Tommy laugh—he loves dicks. His humor is dick and balls stuff. But my humor is pooping. We’re just children. It’s such a great escape from being responsible adults.

Photo by JD Swiger

How do you balance raising kids with having your career?

You really have to be deliberate with your time. When you’re young, time— you just have it. You can sit around and read High Times and watch Butt Bongo Fiesta. And then you get married, you have kids and careers, and you just have to really, really guard your time.

Motherhood is heavy, I’m not going to lie. It’s so much responsibility, especially for me because my family life [growing up] was so wackadoodle. My mom was mentally ill and my parents divorced, so there’s been a lot of stuff I’ve had to work through in therapy for a decade before I had kids. So like, yeah dog, it’s heavy. Motherhood and parenthood is heavy and it should be a responsibility that you take seriously, and it’s really important to not let it get you down.

In Mom Genes, my [latest] one-hour Netflix special, I wanted to make something to get out of the worldwide heaviness of COVID and even now with Russia blowing up Ukraine. Like, you must fight the fight and you must resist what the world wants you to think and feel. I think with social media, we’re so bombarded by negative shit right now that we need to find places to laugh and be juvenile. Sing and dance and be stupid and be silly—this is your life.

Mom Genes isn’t just about motherhood and stuff, it’s meant to be silly and fun and an escape for people. I dressed very glamorously for this special for a reason—I wanted to be transcendent. I want people to watch and feel relief from this world for an hour.

So Mom Genes is meant to give people some fuel to endure and preserve.

I talk about how I love the ’80s because they were about resilience. I believe in resilience. Feelings are important, yes, and it’s nice that we’re honoring everybody’s feelings, but now what? I think it’s such an important thing as I raise my kids to be like, “Yeah dude, life is this, life can suck, things are hard. But guess what, motherfucker? You’re gonna get up and you’re gonna do it again!”

It’s what I learned doing stand-up. You’re gonna fail, things are hard, yes the world is bleak, but get the fuck up and do it again and get better and get stronger. Just keep going. Don’t let this world get you down. Don’t let anybody dictate how you go about in this world.

Pilot your own ship.

Yeah, bro! That’s it, that’s the secret.

Like I said, I’m happy people are discovering narratives that are false. I’ll use women, for instance, because I am one. The whole thing on fat-shaming or women are oppressed and this and that… When I started stand-up, nobody wanted to hear women. It’s guys with their arms folded in the front row, and I could have been like, “Woe is me, this is terrible,” but I was like, “Fuck you, I’m going to make this work.” Just sing your own song and let them come along, bro. Don’t let them tell you who you are. You tell them.

@thechristinap 

christinaponline.com

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Squier’s Specialty Edibles: Real Fruit, Real Flower, No Funny Business

Squier’s Specialty edibles is all about the real and the authentic. Take a peek into their process.

The world of edibles has undergone colossal growth since the days when consumers were buying their brownies from their dealer down the street with complete disregard as to the quality and quantity of cannabis they put in them.

This often raised the question of, “Was this store-bought brownie mix infused with some poorly ‘homemade’ cannabutter so potent it was about to blast you into another dimension, or so low-grade that you would need a whole tray just to feel the effects?”

Courtesy of Squier’s

Zack Squier remembers those days well, and aims to continue on the path of growth and innovation that the industry has seen over the past decade, leaving the uncertainty, stigmas, and lack of quality behind.

Squier’s goal is to raise the bar on our priorities when it comes to consuming edibles, bringing the ingredients to the forefront, and leveling their importance to the same standard as the top shelf cannabis extracts he uses in his products. He wants to raise the question, “Why are we consuming cannabis edibles that we would not otherwise be consuming if they didn’t contain cannabis?” 

Entering an era where individuals are increasingly more health-conscious than the days of TV dinners and soda pop, as consumers we tend to steer clear of products pumped full of artificial flavorings, sweeteners, and food colorings in our everyday lives. Why should we have to renounce our values if we want to consume an edible, and why are our values around food suddenly neglected in order to accommodate our cannabis consumption?

Squire's
Courtesy of Squier’s

“Our goal is to give people a product that they can feel good about consuming, guilt free. We start from scratch with all of our products, no pre-made purées or artificial flavorings, just real ingredients and cannabis. You’ll taste and feel the difference,” says Squier.

Unlike your neighbor’s brownies, Squier’s utilizes the highest quality full-spectrum cannabis extract, allowing consumers to reap the benefits of the whole cannabis plant. The decision to use full-spectrum extract over distillate was a simple one. The most natural of all cannabis concentrates, full-spectrum expresses all elements of the plant, including all of the cannabinoids, terpenes, and flavonoids. Full body and balanced are two effects you can expect. 

Squier’s flagship product is their beverage enhancing Elixirs, made from 100% real fruit, fresh-squeezed citrus, and organic sweetener. Suggested for optimal enjoyment of flavor and effect is mixing directly into seltzer water, essentially creating one’s own fruit-based THC soda.

The options do not end there, however. In addition to mixing with sparkling water or any beverage of one’s choosing, Squier’s Elixirs can moonlight as a food enhancer as well. With a background as an executive chef and years in the culinary world, Zack Squier strongly encourages creativity and innovation with his products. Offered in an array of flavors and dosages, they can be used as an ice cream topper, added to baked goods to personalize your own edibles, or mixed into sauces, marinades, and dressings—anything that could use a little ‘fruit’ punch! 

Squire's
Courtesy of Squier’s

Being that they are pocket-sized makes them an ideal choice for dosing discreetly and on the go, and giving consumers the ability to completely customize their preferred dose from micro to macro. The ingredients and portability are just a few perks to Squier’s Elixirs. Users can expect to feel effects within 15 minutes of consumption. The company’s signature emulsion process creates an incredibly fast-acting, water soluble product without any additives or stabilizers. 

In addition to the beverage enhancing concentrates that Squier’s Specialty Edibles offers, is the anticipated launch of their new ready-to-drink beverage line. Offering a refreshing, sophisticated, and complex flavor profile—This ready-to-drink Elixir is the ideal substitute for alcoholic beverages.

“We know the detrimental effects that alcohol has on both the body and brain, and that’s not to mention the dreaded hangover felt the next day. Our products encourage the same inclusivity and social aspect as alcohol, but with hangovers not included,” mentions Squier. Unique fruit pairings, fresh citrus, carefully selected botanical flower blends, organic raw blue agave, and top shelf full-spectrum cannabis are the components of Squier’s new ready-to-drink beverages.

The company plans to launch a few new lines over 2022 and 2023, including a micro-dosed cold brew coffee line, brewed from sustainably grown and sourced beans hailing from a farm in Peru, and a vegan gummy line made from 100% real fruit and organic ingredients. Wherever you see an edible with the Squier’s stamp, one thing is certain, it was made with the highest quality ingredients and integrity when it comes to both the food and cannabis.

Courtesy of Squier’s

With plans to expand into Massachusetts, Vermont, New York, New Jersey, and some West Coast states the following year, soon, everyone will have access to chef-crafted cannabis infused food and beverages made with the highest quality ingredients. Squier’s plans to produce the bases for all of their products at their headquarters in Portland, Maine, creating an easy transition into other markets without sacrificing any quality whatsoever. “Essentially creating a ‘plug and play’ set up,” says Squier.

Squier’s Edibles will be looking for co-packing partnerships in new states. If your brand is interested in bringing Squier’s Specialty Edibles into your state, please contact zack@squiersedibles.com.

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Opening the Curtain on Cannabis in the Opera

Before getting started, I need to confess; my only exposure to the opera was back in the early 90s when I watched Bugs Bunny play maestro Leopold Stokowski.

Regardless of my lack of experience with and attendance at the opera, with cannabis’ popularity apparent in the theatre, I couldn’t imagine a world in which cannabis wouldn’t make opera better.

The opera house lights dim, the curtains open, and the music starts. A fluttering flute followed by a single, boisterous voice echoing Italian or German, neither of which I speak, but I can understand the emotion behind the words more intimately.

This is my romanticized vision of attending the opera, and I might not be that far off.

But does cannabis play a role in the lives of opera singers? And if so, what are the risks and benefits of consuming as it relates to their career?

Anonymous Opera Singers on Cannabis Consumption

Some opera singers prefer to go off the record when speaking about cannabis consumption. That being said, several anonymous opera singers on Reddit weighed in on the conversation.

One elusively elevated opera enthusiast on Reddit claimed that singers perform while high in top opera houses throughout the world.

A second nameless Redditor said, “Weed made long tech rehearsals bearable.”

According to another unknown Redditor, “From my experience, older generation of singers drink vodka and cognac, younger guys smoke, but not tenors.”

Another unnamed Redditor said, “Soprano here, just sang the Brahms Requiem stoned out of my f*cking mind on Sunday.”

And, my personal favorite anonymous statement on the increasingly apparent: “Only tenors and sopranos get high.”

Michael Mayes / Photo by Michael Yeshion

The Self-Proclaimed “Willie Nelson of Opera Singers”

Michael Mayes, a professional opera singer and the self-proclaimed “Willie Nelson of opera singers,” discussed his experience with cannabis in the opera.

“There’s a boatload of opera singers who use cannabis,” Mayes said. “I don’t think I’d have gotten to where I am in the industry without it.”

“Cannabis really helped me get through a traumatic time in my life and was much less devastating to my health than my old vices that just weren’t working anymore, and were in fact taking a real toll on my health,” he added. “It also provided me with much needed relief from my chronic pain, which had become a real barrier to my expression on stage, without the side effects that a lot of pain relievers have that can be detrimental to the voice.”

But like others performing in the opera houses, he and his wife, Megan Marino, a Mezzo-Soprano, didn’t advertise their cannabis use early on.

“It used to be such a taboo thing in our industry. People were really cagey about it, and it definitely had a real sort of insider stoner kind of vibe—like a weird fraternity of pot smokers who could sniff each other out,” Mayes reminisced. “We definitely didn’t advertise the fact that we used cannabis early on—but once legalization hit Colorado, that all changed.”

Edibles & The Opera

Edibles seemingly brought cannabis use into the mainstream of opera; performers then had an accessible way to consume without damaging their vocal folds.

“Singers could get the benefits of the plant without having to pull smoke across our vocal folds, which for a lot of singers is just too harsh a delivery system,” Mayes explained. “The demands that we make of our voices are so heavy (think elite athletes) that inhaling smoke was just a non-starter for a lot of singers.”

“I find edibles to be the best for me,” Marino added. “Though I do partake in flower when I’m on a long enough stretch between jobs. I barely notice the effects smoking has, but I don’t want to push my luck. I’ve been making my own edibles, butter in particular, since 2005.”

As a benefit of union membership, Megan has access to free online college courses and is pursuing a cannabis concentration as part of her degree. Cannabis justice reform is important to her, and she hopes that by continuing her education, she’ll play a role in changing it.

“‘Reefer Madness’ propaganda and Nixon’s drug war is no longer popular in American culture,” Marino explained. “We’ve seen the dangerous effects of alcoholism and the opioid epidemic. Let’s give folks, especially those dealing with chronic pain or stressful jobs, legal access to the safer option of cannabis.”

Megan is continuing with her education and shares her infused foods with her friends and colleagues.

“I used to make lots of confections (from the traditional brownie or cookie to pies & patisserie) to share with friends and colleagues in almost all corners of the biz—from my fellow singers to rehearsal pianists, stage managers, directors, administrators, artist managers—at ALL levels of the business and nationalities,” Marino said. “Now that it’s so readily available and legalized for medical, adult-use, or decriminalized in so many of the places I work, that part of my sharing is less frequent.”

“Anecdotally, I would say that I know more administrators now who use/have used cannabis that don’t, and they will often pick my brain about making their own edibles and extracts,” Mayes added. “This is something I would never have dreamed of contemplating 10 years ago.”

Marino as Rosina in Rossini’s Il barbiere di Siviglia with Opera Colorado / Photo by Matthew Staver

Other Consumption Methods in the Opera House

Those in the limelight of this genre are also familiar with other consumption methods, but the preferences among opera singers vary.

“Once the cartridges came out, a lot of folks found that they could use them without much stress on their cords, but the way inhalable cannabis affects the voice really varies by the individual; a lot of singers just won’t inhale smoke of any kind, while others don’t seem to suffer any fatigue or negative effect on their singing whatsoever,” Mayes explained.

Tinctures are popular, too. While living in Colorado, Mayes and Marino grew cannabis and made tinctures. After recreational cannabis became available in the Centennial State, there was a shift in the attitude surrounding it in the opera house.

“As more singers began to use cannabis—and spoke freely about using it—administrators’ attitudes began to shift toward acceptance, and now acceptance has become almost ubiquitous among admins—especially in legal states,” Mayes said. “They’re the ones who do the hiring and the firing, so this was a welcome development for those of us who partake.”

Mayes also cleared the air around his own consumption.

“I’m never high before or during a performance when I’m singing opera … just too many moving parts and things that could go wrong,” Mayes explained. “But when we’re playing with our bluegrass/Americana band, that’s a different story…”

Cannabis Smoke & the Voice: What Does Science Say?

So, we’ve heard how opera singers feel about cannabis consumption. But data-backed insights are essential to pair with anecdotal evidence, especially in the cannabis industry.

Research published in The Journal of Voice and reported on in PsyPost highlights how smoking cannabis affects the voice.

“Marijuana use has been common among rock and popular singers for decades, but it also occurs among other professional voice users including classical singers, teachers, politicians, clergy and many others,” study author Robert T. Sataloff, a professor and chairman of the Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery at Drexel University, explained.

“Until very recently, it was not possible to study the effects of marijuana on voice prospectively because the substance was illegal. It still is in many states. Nevertheless, anecdotally laryngologists have seen adverse effects from marijuana,” Sataloff added.

The researchers surveyed 42 adult patients from Sataloff’s clinical voice center. Around 77% of the study’s participants reported that they’d tried cannabis during their lifetime.

Those who’d tried it reported on their beliefs about perceived changes to their voices that resulted from cannabis consumption. Around 42% of the cannabis users believed that smoking cannabis immediately altered their voice, and 29% reported that they think their consumption had a long-term impact, including vocal weakness and hoarseness.

“Smoking marijuana can cause voice dysfunction. For high-level voice users such as opera singers, intoxication or alteration in cognitive function from any cause can alter fine motor control and result in voice injury. This is true of marijuana, as it is of alcohol,” Sataloff told PsyPost.

One other study published in 1980 showcased how cannabis use can affect the voice. This research offers some evidence highlighting the darkened vocal folds of cannabis smokers. However, researchers still must conduct other studies to learn how cannabis impacts the voice.

The opera community has spoken. And it makes sense that the opera house is becoming more cannabis-friendly, especially with legality budding in states throughout the country.

The post Opening the Curtain on Cannabis in the Opera appeared first on High Times.

Mac ‘n’ Weed? Celeb Chef Touts New Line of Cannabis-Infused Foods

The world of cannabis-infused dining keeps getting more delicious, thanks in part to contributions from world-renowned chef Todd English.

English is the master chef behind LastLeaf, a new brand of food designed to satisfy your appetite and get you high.

LastLeaf’s first two products center on an American staple: macaroni and cheese.

There’s two flavors of the mac: pasta shells with white cheddar and classic elbow macaroni with cheddar, both of which come infused with ten milligrams of THC isolate.

English told ABC News in a recent interview that the products have been “getting a great response.”

For English, preparing meals with cannabis is personal.

“I saw my sister and a number of my relatives go through horrible cancer,” English told ABC News. “My sister passed away, unfortunately, but during the time she was in remission, I would prepare things with cannabis and it seemed to really help her get through the struggles of how she felt after chemo.”

Cannabis-infused food has exploded in popularity in the last decade, with more than a dozen states and multiple cities throughout the U.S. legalizing cannabis use for adults.

For now, LastLeaf’s mac and cheese products are only available in California, where adult-use cannabis has been legal since 2016, but ABC News reported that English “hopes to expand the line to more cities that have legalized marijuana for recreational use” later this year.

“Consumers are ready for it, but it’s going to take a little bit of time to get embedded into the marketplace,” LastLeaf founder and CEO Keith Burkard told ABC News.

“The cannabis industry started out with a lot of secondary food groups like drinks, chips, snacks, chocolates, candies,” Burkhard added. “We’re introducing primary food group edibles.”

LastLeaf says it’s taking a different approach to cannabis-infused food, with its emphasis on “savory flavors and micro-dosing.” 

“We work with top-rated, creative chefs to provide culinary products for the American at-home chef,” the company says on its website. “Cooking, just like cannabis, can be adventurous and fun, but we deeply believe in the healing powers of food and the cannabis plant, individually and together. Now we get to share the best of both worlds with you.”

It’s in California where another famed chef plies his trade with cannabis-infused meals.

In late February, Chris Sayegh opened The Herbal Chef in Santa Monica, California.

“Cannabis deserves to be recognized as the superfood it is and plated with other foods,” Sayegh told High Times in an interview earlier this year. “It’s way past time for diners to be enlightened to this point. In my mind, cannabis is just another food at the table with the added bonus of inducing happiness. My team and I witness this every time we feed our guests. It’s not rocket science, it’s the science of foods that uplift and heal.”

That line of work is nothing new for Sayegh, who is also the brains behind Nostalgia Bar & Lounge in Santa Monica.

The bar offers customers a chance to catch a buzz in a cozy, intimate space.

Its website bills the experience thusly: “Creature comforts from back in the day are reimagined utilizing Sayegh’s technical culinary background, paired with expertise from THC’s team- Chef and Partner Jared Ventura, Services Director Jack Goldberg, and Beverage Director Bradley Fry, to create playful New American bites and a quality bar program at Nostalgia. Guest can sip inventive CBD- and terpene-infused cocktails that draw inspiration from nostalgic delights like Otter-Pops, Orange Julius, and Capri Suns, play old-school board games like Operation and Battleship in the lounge, or kick back on the numerous picnic tables situated on the expansive outdoor patio.”

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To suck or swallow? The pharmacology of THC edibles

There are a lot of ways to take cannabis from smoking to brownies. A dichotomy even exists in some edibles. In other words, it will produce a different experience to suck on or swallow a cannabis-infused candy, for example. To understand the different consumption methods, we have to look into the pharmacology of cannabis and […]

The post To suck or swallow? The pharmacology of THC edibles appeared first on Cannabis News, Lifestyle – Headlines, Videos & Cooking.

FDA Sounds Alarm About Cereal and Candy Edibles that Appeal to Children

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) once again cautioned people to keep their edibles out of reach from children, especially the ones with sketchy, colorful packaging that might appeal to children.

On May 13, the FDA issued a warning, sounding the alarm about lookalike products that mimic candy and more recently—children’s cereal.

Copycat products that were highlighted in the warning mimic Cap’n Crunch, Cocoa Pebbles, Cocoa Puffs, Froot Loops, Fruity Pebbles, Nerds Ropes, Starbursts, Sour Patch Kids, and Trix, among others.

There are two reasons not to support gray area cannabis products like these: the potential appeal to children being one, and the other being the ethical violation of blatantly ripping off the intellectual property of mainstream food companies. But the FDA was mainly concerned about the physical symptoms that could occur in children.

“The FDA is aware of multiple media reports describing children and adults who accidentally consumed copycat edible products containing THC and experienced adverse events,” the organization wrote. “Additionally, from January 2021 through April 24, 2022, the FDA received over 100 adverse event reports related to children and adults who consumed edible products containing THC.”

Symptoms to look out for include “hallucinations” and “vomiting.”

“Some individuals who ate these edible products reportedly experienced adverse events such as hallucinations, increased heart rate and vomiting, and many required medical intervention or hospital admission,” the warning continues. “Seven of the reports specifically mention the edible product to be a copycat of popular foods, such as Cocoa Pebbles, Nerds Rope, Skittles, Sour Patch Kids, and Starburst.”

Separating Dangers from Myth

Both CBD and THC show promise in pediatrics for mental and physical conditions in controlled doses, such as intractable epilepsy, but children’s small bodies usually can’t withstand THC like an adult. If a small child (or pet) consumes them by accident, it can quickly become “a situation.” All adults carry the responsibility of keeping their edibles out of reach, and most do.

But sometimes, hysteria makes these warnings seem less credible. For children and adults, a “whiteout” can be a scary experience, but “overdoses solely by marijuana are unlikely,” even the CDC admits. At the crack of October 1, we receive our annual warning about supposed cannabis-infused candy being passed out to children on Halloween, but sometimes said stories are debunked.

The FDA gave three recommendations in the event that a child consumes an edible:

  • Call 9-1-1 or get emergency medical help right away if you or someone in your care has serious side effects from these products. Always keep these products in a safe place out of reach of children.
  • Call the local poison control center (1-800-222-1222) if a child has consumed these products. Do not wait for symptoms to call.
  • Contact your healthcare provider if you or someone in your care recently ingested these products and you have health concerns.

The FDA also gave three ways to file a complaint in a dark warning to people with nosy neighbors, living in fear of people dropping the dime and calling Child Protective Services. It’s unclear if the complaint avenues are intended for parents themselves or others.

“Health care professionals, patients and consumers are encouraged to report complaints and cases of exposure and adverse events to the FDA’s MedWatch Safety Information and Adverse Event Reporting Program,” the warning reads.

Last year, over 100 people dialed in.

Copycat Edibles Are a Problem, Not Only for Children

As it turns out, mainstream food companies essentially want the same thing, but mostly for a different reason. On April 27, a group of a dozen major food companies called on Congress to crack down on the growing number of THC-infused copycat knockoffs.

“Children are increasingly threatened by the unscrupulous use of famous brand logos, characters, trademarks, and trade dress on THC-laced edible products. While cannabis (and incidental amounts of THC) may be legal in some states, the use of these famous marks, clearly without approval of the brand owners, on food products has created serious health and safety risks for consumers, particularly children, who cannot tell the difference between these brands’ true products and copycat THC products that leverage the brand’s fame for profit,” the companies wrote in the letter.

Parents with small children and teens are advised to double check that their edibles are out of reach from children.

The post FDA Sounds Alarm About Cereal and Candy Edibles that Appeal to Children appeared first on High Times.

FDA Sounds Alarm About Cereal and Candy Edibles that Appeal to Children

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) once again cautioned people to keep their edibles out of reach from children, especially the ones with sketchy, colorful packaging that might appeal to children.

On May 13, the FDA issued a warning, sounding the alarm about lookalike products that mimic candy and more recently—children’s cereal.

Copycat products that were highlighted in the warning mimic Cap’n Crunch, Cocoa Pebbles, Cocoa Puffs, Froot Loops, Fruity Pebbles, Nerds Ropes, Starbursts, Sour Patch Kids, and Trix, among others.

There are two reasons not to support gray area cannabis products like these: the potential appeal to children being one, and the other being the ethical violation of blatantly ripping off the intellectual property of mainstream food companies. But the FDA was mainly concerned about the physical symptoms that could occur in children.

“The FDA is aware of multiple media reports describing children and adults who accidentally consumed copycat edible products containing THC and experienced adverse events,” the organization wrote. “Additionally, from January 2021 through April 24, 2022, the FDA received over 100 adverse event reports related to children and adults who consumed edible products containing THC.”

Symptoms to look out for include “hallucinations” and “vomiting.”

“Some individuals who ate these edible products reportedly experienced adverse events such as hallucinations, increased heart rate and vomiting, and many required medical intervention or hospital admission,” the warning continues. “Seven of the reports specifically mention the edible product to be a copycat of popular foods, such as Cocoa Pebbles, Nerds Rope, Skittles, Sour Patch Kids, and Starburst.”

Separating Dangers from Myth

Both CBD and THC show promise in pediatrics for mental and physical conditions in controlled doses, such as intractable epilepsy, but children’s small bodies usually can’t withstand THC like an adult. If a small child (or pet) consumes them by accident, it can quickly become “a situation.” All adults carry the responsibility of keeping their edibles out of reach, and most do.

But sometimes, hysteria makes these warnings seem less credible. For children and adults, a “whiteout” can be a scary experience, but “overdoses solely by marijuana are unlikely,” even the CDC admits. At the crack of October 1, we receive our annual warning about supposed cannabis-infused candy being passed out to children on Halloween, but sometimes said stories are debunked.

The FDA gave three recommendations in the event that a child consumes an edible:

  • Call 9-1-1 or get emergency medical help right away if you or someone in your care has serious side effects from these products. Always keep these products in a safe place out of reach of children.
  • Call the local poison control center (1-800-222-1222) if a child has consumed these products. Do not wait for symptoms to call.
  • Contact your healthcare provider if you or someone in your care recently ingested these products and you have health concerns.

The FDA also gave three ways to file a complaint in a dark warning to people with nosy neighbors, living in fear of people dropping the dime and calling Child Protective Services. It’s unclear if the complaint avenues are intended for parents themselves or others.

“Health care professionals, patients and consumers are encouraged to report complaints and cases of exposure and adverse events to the FDA’s MedWatch Safety Information and Adverse Event Reporting Program,” the warning reads.

Last year, over 100 people dialed in.

Copycat Edibles Are a Problem, Not Only for Children

As it turns out, mainstream food companies essentially want the same thing, but mostly for a different reason. On April 27, a group of a dozen major food companies called on Congress to crack down on the growing number of THC-infused copycat knockoffs.

“Children are increasingly threatened by the unscrupulous use of famous brand logos, characters, trademarks, and trade dress on THC-laced edible products. While cannabis (and incidental amounts of THC) may be legal in some states, the use of these famous marks, clearly without approval of the brand owners, on food products has created serious health and safety risks for consumers, particularly children, who cannot tell the difference between these brands’ true products and copycat THC products that leverage the brand’s fame for profit,” the companies wrote in the letter.

Parents with small children and teens are advised to double check that their edibles are out of reach from children.

The post FDA Sounds Alarm About Cereal and Candy Edibles that Appeal to Children appeared first on High Times.

Cannabis Substitution Project Raided by Vancouver Police – Charges Laid

On Tuesday, May 10th, 2022, The Cannabis Substitution Program (CSP) was raided by Vancouver police, and charges have been laid. An unexpected blow from the province, many are concerned about this heavy-handed approach. Here are the details about this developing situation.  What is the Cannabis Substitution Program? Set up on the downtown eastside, the Cannabis […]

The post Cannabis Substitution Project Raided by Vancouver Police – Charges Laid appeared first on Cannabis News, Lifestyle – Headlines, Videos & Cooking.

Simply Crafted CBD’s Potent Promise

Simply Crafted is on a mission to provide the best possible hemp-derived products at an affordable price. The Minnesota-based company is home to the state’s largest selection of high-quality smokable hemp flower and a range of other hemp-derived CBD products that focus on supporting customers through every step of their wellness journey.

Simply Crafted believes that the healing power of hemp should be accessible to everyone. To that end, the company was founded in 2019 to provide natural remedies to help with an array of ailments. They focus on developing products that are full-spectrum and contain minor cannabinoids while maximizing terpene retention during the extraction process.

“We believe hemp flower, CBD and other industrial hemp-derived products should be sold responsibly and ethically,” Amanda Stead, founder of Simply Crafted said in a press release.

 “That’s why we rigorously test all of our flower and hemp products to ensure they’re in full compliance with the 2018 Farm Bill.”

Simply Crafted CBD Products

Simply Crafted works with local sustainable and organic farms to ensure only premium hemp flower is used to create its range of THC and CBD products, including gummies, pre-rolls, vape pens and water-soluble syrups all designed to meet your health and wellness needs.

The brand also offers a wide range of some of the most potent delta-8 edibles currently on the market. The 2018 Farm Bill made hemp and hemp-derived cannabinoids like delta-9 and delta-8 THC legal in all 50 states as long as the product contains at or below 0.3% THC.

High Spectrum CBD + THC Hemp Gummies

Simply Crafted CBD and THC gummies will satisfy your cravings for sweets and potent highs. These candies are unique in that each one contains a hefty dose of 10 mg of hemp-derived THC.

You might be wondering how the gummies can be so potent while pertaining to the aforementioned legal THC amounts. It’s simple math, really. Simply Crafted infuses THC from locally sourced organic hemp into its gummies that weigh in at 4500 mg each (10mg of THC in a gummy that weighs 4500 mg means that there’s far less than 0.3% THC content per gummy). And they didn’t stop there—each gummy is also infused with 10mg of CBD to round out the efficacy of the gummy and provide added therapeutic benefits.

Each pack of delta-9 THC and CBD High Spectrum Hemp Gummies contains 10 gummies with varying delicious and all-natural flavors, such as blackberry, peach and watermelon.

Delta-8 THC Syrup

Cannabis aficionados and the canna-curious alike will love this game-changing syrup. Packing a potent 1000 mg of THC, this all-natural syrup is infused with nano-encapsulated and water-soluble delta-8 THC, making it perfect for mixing into any drink, or for creating your own cannabis cocktails.

Delta-8 products have taken the cannabis industry by storm. The naturally occurring cannabinoid is produced as a byproduct of “regular” THC, also known as delta-9 THC. When delta-9 THC is destroyed or degraded by the sun or the passage of time, it might transform into delta-8 THC. The key distinction between delta-8 and delta-9 THC is that delta-8 feels more like THC light. That is, it has the same effects of THC—euphoria, relaxation and overall mood enhancer—but on a more pared-back level.

The customizable dosage of the Simply Crafted Delta-8 THC Syrup makes it perfect for all levels of cannabis experience. Note that high bioavailability and rapid absorption will have you feeling the effects quicker, reducing the risk of over-consumption. The syrup is available in four flavors, including raspberrylemonmango and sugar-free.

Giving Back

One of the Simply Crafted brand pillars is educating customers and the wider community, and advocating for cannabis law reform. The company proudly supports NORML and the Last Prisoner Project in their endeavors to change US cannabis policies and is a member of the National Cannabis Industry Association and the Hemp Industries Association.

Simply Crafted is your one-stop shop for vapes, glass, accessories and a huge selection of unique CBD, CBG, CBN, delta-8 and hemp-derived delta-9 THC products. All products are rigorously third-party tested in federally regulated, ISO certified labs to give customers complete peace of mind. Simply Crafted also offers a 100% money-back guarantee. This means you can buy delta-8 edibles and more from its Minnesota store, or online if you are out state.

“Our passion for excellence has driven us from the beginning, and continues to drive us into the future,” Stead said.

Use promo code CANNABISNOW to save 30% on your Simply Crafted products.

The post Simply Crafted CBD’s Potent Promise appeared first on Cannabis Now.

Flower is King: Sales Breakdown

Flower is king in the cannabis world. It is the dominant category in every market, requiring little-to-no processing; it is often the cheapest category of cannabis. And flower is versatile. It can be smoked, vaped or used to make edibles or oil. From a business standpoint, flower is also susceptible to price fluctuations. The price […]

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