Canna River’s Delta 8 Blue Dream Delivers a Pleasant, Subdued Consumption Experience

First developed in the mid-80s, delta-8-tetrahydrocannabinol, or Delta 8, has seen incremental growth over the past 20 years. Its most recent surge comes after federal lawmakers legalized hemp as part of the 2018 Farm Bill, though some still view it as a dubious compound.

By 2021, product popularity was soaring. The sales influx had numerous states imploring federal agencies on Delta 8 classification and regulation. In September, the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) stated that products containing .3% or less THC were not considered controlled substances. Therefore, sales could go forth.

In response, state lawmakers spent the past few years enacting anti-Delta 8 legislation. As of May 2022, 20 states have passed legislation regulating, restricting, or outright banning the products within its jurisdictions. Despite the ban, scores of companies remain in the market, offering an alternative to THC.

California’s Canna River has been in the CBD game since launching in October 2019. Billed as a CBD company without gimmicks, the company feels that each person’s cannabis consumption experience is unique and that its products are “just helping you live it.” The company offers a plethora of products featuring Delta 8, CBD, and hexahydrocannabinol (HHC), another hemp-derived cannabinoid making waves in recent years, all in a bid to satisfy various unique consumer preferences.

The company’s one-gram Delta 8 vape carts are a featured item. While Delta 8 isn’t for everyone, namely those seeking the potent effects of THC, Canna River’s Blue Dream cart does a commendable job offering up the best of the cannabinoid. Whether you’re a patient, someone looking for more minor psychoactive effects, or otherwise, this modestly priced option may hit the mark for you.

Courtesy of Canna River

The Canna River Brand

Canna River is a CBD company selling a range of consumer options. While carts will be the focus today, it would be an oversight not to mention the company’s broad line. In addition to vaped products, CBD staples like oils, topicals, and capsules are also available—including flavored CBD options ranging from Watermelon to Bacon. I’m glad we’re focusing on the Blue Dream this time around, truth be told. But hey, each person’s consumption preferences are different. If you want some bacon flavor in your CBD, Canna River has it for you.

The company’s brand is vibrant, bursting with color made evident on social media. Underneath the vibrance is a range of products that could appear in the aisles of a pharmacy or beauty store. That is the case with the Delta 8 cartridges. Blue Dream’s packaging is a mix of bright blueberries over clean black and white background and straightforward text. The combination is sure to attract the eye of various consumers, medical and personal use.

The company also offers its lab results via a QR code on its box, allowing customers to confirm product contents and lab results before buying. Whether picking up Canna River or any other cannabis line, do yourself a favor and check the lab results to verify the product’s plant profile and other critical tests.

Courtesy of Canna River

Blue Dream Delta 8 Cartridge Specs

Eye-catching packaging isn’t enough to keep customers coming back. Without a quality product inside, a sleek design won’t do much long-term. Canna River understands this quite well, offering consumers a line of Delta 8 distillate carts that live up to their billing as easy to use and enjoyable for various cannabis consumers.

Each one-gram cart is 510 thread battery compatible and Farm Bill compliant. Sourced from U.S. hemp, products contain some percentage of THC, totaling less than .3%. Each cart contains pharmaceutical-grade terpenes, with Blue Dream’s terp combination made to complement what the company calls “a superior head high.”

Canna River offers five additional Delta 8 cart strains alongside Blue Dream. They are:

Banana Split
Cherry AK
Hawaiian Snowcap
Sour GMO
Watermelon Zkittles

Each cart retails on Canna River’s website for $35. Packs of 10 are available for $175.

Courtesy of Canna River

Does The Delta 8 Cartridge Taste Like Blue Dream?

This cart lives up to the billing, tasting like Blue Dream. Still, its subtlety may leave some longing for more from their pulls.

The flavor notes were apparent, coming through more subtle than one might get with other carts that pump flavor in. The inhale tastes relatively flavorless, keeping the vapor as the focal point of the act. The subtle blueberry notes briefly came through on the exhale. The flavor cameo may not be enough for some consumers seeking an abundance of aroma or taste. But on the flip side, Canna River’s offering does not leave any unwanted lingering tastes in the mouth, as some terp pumped-up carts do.

What Are The Effects?

Canna River’s Blue Dream cart delivered what most expect from Delta 8: A consumption experience with subtlety.

The effects feel similar to consuming a 10:1 CBD:THC product. You may experience a bit of the heady sensations, but much of the results are felt in the body. The peak of the impact came around the one-hour mark, with additional pulls helping keep the momentum going. Overall, the effects seemed to last as they would with other vaped cannabis products, totaling about four to five hours.

With Blue Dream, I was able to get through the day seeing friends without feeling too high to socialize. At work, I stayed on track while feeling slightly more relaxed than usual. Throughout the day, I was able to stay creative and not lose track of my to-do list.

A bit of caution: Some vape restraint may be required, especially if the lessened effects leave you wanting more. Delta 8 may compel some regular consumers to take additional pulls for an elevated yet still subdued effect. Certainly possible to attain, consumers can find themselves overdoing it. Granted, it should take a significant amount to push that threshold on regular consumers. But newcomers may get tripped up. If you’re a newcomer, start with one or two small pulls, wait 30 to 60 minutes, and evaluate if you’d like another dose.

Delta 8
Courtesy of Canna River

In Review

Canna River’s Delta 8 carts offer consumers a subtle, pleasant consumption experience.

You won’t find an abundance of flavor or overwhelming effects from just a pull or two. Instead, you’re getting a consumption experience that should play a supporting role in your day. For personal use consumers, that may mean getting that type of high that makes the weekend much more enjoyable without locking you to the couch. For medical consumers, this type of experience can allow consumers to medicate using a cannabinoid-specific treatment that may help address their medical conditions.

Most Delta 8 carts tend to retail at around $25 to $35. Still, others on the market have gone higher, sometimes doubling the price per unit. The price point seems justifiable when considering the quality of the cannabis and the reliability of the cart used. At $35 per cart, Canna River keeps the wallet impact minimal without cutting costs via substandard materials. Retailing at this price should make Canna River’s carts accessible to newcomers and returning customers.

Delta 8 will continue to face scrutiny from lawmakers and within some pockets of the cannabis community. While true, there is clearly a market catering to various consumers. If you find yourself in this camp or are interested in finding out about Delta 8 first-hand, consider Canna River.

The post Canna River’s Delta 8 Blue Dream Delivers a Pleasant, Subdued Consumption Experience appeared first on High Times.

Oregon Cracks Down on Lab-Made Cannabinoids

Regulators in Oregon will enact a ban on cannabinoids produced through laboratory processes, making the state the first in the nation to restrict the sale of so-called synthesized cannabinoids at grocery stores and other general retailers. The ban from state cannabis regulators, which goes into effect on July 1, prohibits the sale of lab-made cannabinoids including delta-8 THC at supermarkets, drug stores, and other retailers that have not obtained a special license. The new regulations will go into effect only weeks after a federal appeals court ruled that delta-8 THC and other cannabinoids derived from hemp are legal under federal law.

Delta-8 THC and minor cannabinoids derived from hemp have become business across the country since the federal legalization of hemp agriculture and processing with the 2018 Farm Bill. Although these cannabinoids are generally found in hemp at very small concentrations if at all, many of the substances can be created in a lab through the chemical conversion of CBD. But the Oregon Liquor and Cannabis Commission (OLCC) is concerned about the safety of the process and the chemicals used to carry it out and more than a dozen states have instituted bans on delta-8 THC.

Steven Crowley, the hemp and processing compliance specialist with the OLCC, told Oregon Live that delta-8 THC and other cannabinoids became increasingly popular with hemp processors after a glut of CBD flooded the market.

“The supply of CBD was outstripping the demand for CBD,” said Crowley. “And so, the people who had CBD on hand were looking for other ways that they could market it. People started working on different products that they could convert the CBD into. This is where you get the delta-8 THC products.”

FDA Issues Delta-8 THC Warning

Last month, the Food and Drug Administration and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention issued a warning about delta-8 THC, noting that more than 100 reports of adverse effects caused by products containing the cannabinoid were recorded over the span of 15 months. And the OLCC is concerned about the safety of the chemicals used to process CBD into other cannabinoids and whether trace amounts of the substances can be retained in finished products.

“We have testing for pesticides,” said Crowley. “We have testing for residual solvents from the extraction process. We don’t have any testing for any of the whole universe of chemical reagents that you could use to synthetically turn one cannabinoid into something else, or for any of the byproducts of that reaction.”

The new OLCC regulations prohibit the sale of products containing synthesized cannabinoids at general retailers beginning on July 1. At that time, the sale of such products will be allowed exclusively at retailers licensed by the OLCC, but only after they have undergone rigorous safety testing and receive approval from the  FDA.

The decision by the OLCC is opposed by companies that produce and market cannabinoids derived from hemp including Wyld, an Oregon firm that manufacturers gummies with the cannabinoid CBN, which can be processed from CBD and has been shown to promote sleep. Gabe Lee, general counsel at Wyld and Wyld CBD, said that the new regulation will help the company’s bottom line and have a negative impact on consumers, as well.

“The Wyld elderberry CBN gummy is the number one selling gummy on earth right now,” said Lee. “It’s 20%-30% of our revenue depending on the state. People love it.”

Instead of a complete ban, Lee said that Oregon should draft best practices to be followed in the production of hemp-derived cannabinoids.

“There are ways to regulate it and there are definitely ways that we can ensure that the end product that’s being sold is subject to enough safety testing and safety standards to ensure, to the degree possible, the safety of the product without any sort of larger federal research grants or anything like that,” Lee said.

The attorney also noted that with the ban, consumers who have already been using the products without problems will see higher prices at licensed retailers.

“They may not want to go shop at an OLCC retailer or pay the prices that are up there,” Lee said, “because they are definitely charging a higher price in the OLCC regulated market than they are at New Seasons,” referring to a chain of neighborhood grocery stores popular in the Pacific Northwest.

The new regulations go into effect only weeks after a federal appeals court ruled that delta-8 THC and other cannabinoids derived from hemp are legal under the 2018 Farm Bill. In an opinion from the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals released last month, Judge D. Michael Fisher wrote that products made with delta-8 THC are generally legal under federal law, which defines hemp as “any part of” the cannabis plant, including “all derivatives, extracts, [and] cannabinoids,” that contains less than 0.3 percent delta-9 THC by weight.

Federal statute “is silent with regard to delta-8 THC,” the court said in its 3-0 ruling.

“Regardless of the wisdom of legalizing delta-8 THC products, this Court will not substitute its own policy judgment for that of Congress,” Fisher wrote in the appeals court’s unanimous decision.

The post Oregon Cracks Down on Lab-Made Cannabinoids appeared first on High Times.

Recreation or Wellness? At Canna River, They’re the Same.

Canna River prioritizes both cannabis health and recreation with their unique approach to the plant.

When states began legalizing cannabis, it was a huge gain for everyone who consumes it—no matter the reason. The same can be said for the 2018 Farm Bill. However, the legalities of cannabis also created divisions that don’t exist beyond the law. For instance, hemp and marijuana are the same species of plant, except hemp contains less than .3% THC. Their names are a legal distinction, not a scientific one. 

Similarly, laws formalized the distinction between medical and recreational cannabis. Now the assumption is that if someone consumes it for fun, it is not supportive. Hemp wellness brand Canna River would argue this reasoning does not reflect the big picture, and they are doing their part to break down this division with their affordable selection of high quality Farm Bill compliant delta 8, delta 10, and HHC products.

Courtesy of Canna River

CBD Beginnings

Canna River started out with a handful of low-cost, high potency full spectrum and broad-spectrum CBD tinctures. Their goal was to make premium lab tested CBD affordable.

“During the initial mainstream CBD boom, it seemed like people had two choices: buy something of questionable quality cheap from a fly by night or buy expensive products with barely any CBD in them from vetted brands. I wanted to do things differently,” said Canna River co-founder Grant Boatman. “Instead of a few hundred milligrams a bottle for $75 to $200, our CBD tincture strengths start at 1000mg for $35. That’s full price, and we still do lots of sales.” 

The brand grew quickly, expanding tincture flavors and adding CBD products like topicals and capsules within the first few months of launching in 2019. Early adopters remember their rustic earth tones. These days, Canna River has colorful branding and over 100 SKUs, including hemp-derived alternative cannabinoids.

“Our messaging stayed the same, but our new look was huge for us. It helped make our vibe more reflective of the diverse products we carry,” said Boatman. 

Canna River
Courtesy of Canna River

High-Potency Delta 8  

The Canna River Delta 8 Tincture was the first alternative cannabinoid product to hit their site. They make it at their state-of-the-art facility in Southern California using the same premium materials in their CBD tinctures—organic MCT oil and food grade flavoring like berries, strawberry lemonade, guava, and their best-selling lemon raspberry. They are lab-tested, sugar-free, vegan, and non-GMO. 

At the time of the tincture’s release, they didn’t think of delta 8 in terms of recreational use. “We’re big proponents of the entourage effect, and delta 8 just felt like the latest and greatest in hemp support. But everyone who tried our tincture said ‘Whoa. This is strong!’ It was hilarious.”

For context, their premium delta 8 tinctures come in impressive 1500mg and 3000mg bottles for just $35 and $65, respectively. “We discovered when it comes to delta 8, our love of crafting high-potency products meant a powerful experience people weren’t getting elsewhere.”

For Canna River, this discovery also meant expanding product offerings to be more inclusive of their customers’ needs. “Some people want a mix of CBD and alternative cannabinoids, but others only want delta 8 or only want THC-free broad spectrum CBD. The same goes for the type of product. Some people love capsules but hate tinctures, don’t like to vape but love gummies. We say there’s no wrong way to get hemp support.” On a mission to let people do hemp their way, they added delta 8 gummies and cartridges. 

The Canna River Delta 8 Gummy comes in 20 piece 500mg bottles (25mg delta 8 per gummy). They are available in six delicious flavors, including Blue Razz, Dragon Berry, Hazy Apple, Caramel Pear, Island Splash, and Major Melonz. The edibles secured their place as a top stop for delta 8, but their Delta 8 Cartridges were the brand’s first real gamble on the expansion. “Even though our delta 8 tinctures are powerful, they’re still tinctures. The connotations are different from vape,” said Boatman. “Once we introduced carts, it was a new day.”

Their 1 gram cartridges come in classic strains like Blue Dream, Banana Split, Cherry AK, Hawaiian Snowcap, Sour GMO, and Watermelon Zkittles for just $35. They also sell them in discounted boxes of 10 and 60 units. Although the cartridges launched as faithful strain replications, they have evolved into proprietary terpene blends inspired by their namesakes. This transition is all thanks to Canna River’s latest leap into the alternative cannabinoid game—their ultra-popular Highlighter pens. 

Canna River
Courtesy of Canna River

Game-Changing Disposable Pens

In the hemp-derived alternative cannabinoid space, pens reign. “It isn’t easy to sell it and CBD under the same roof, just from a regulatory red tape aspect. CBD is in department stores, while laws and attitudes toward stuff like delta 8 or HHC are constantly changing,” said Boatman. “But despite our low prices, we spare no expense in manufacturing compliant goods. People can trust they are getting a quality product.” 

Canna River Highlighters are disposable rechargeable neon-colored 2.5 gram vape pens. They cost $40 and are currently available in HHC and a delta blend. The HHC Highlighter comes in Blue Dream, Mango, Lemon Raspberry, Green Crack, Dragon Berry and Watermelon Zkittles. The Delta 8 + Delta 10 Highlighter comes in Blue Dream, Cherry AK, Green Crack, Hawaiian Snowcap, Sour GMO, and Watermelon Zkittles.

While the effects are notable, the flavors also set them apart. These are not direct strain copies. The Green Crack is a bold caramel apple. The Hawaiian Snowcap? It tastes like a slushie. “How it tastes is part of the experience,” said Boatman. “I wanted our terpene profiles to be memorable and stand out from the crowd, even if that meant straying from tradition.” 

Canna River
Courtesy of Canna River

Why Not Both?

With so many recreation-friendly products, it may be hard for some to believe that Canna River is still the same support-centric brand it was when it first launched with a few CBD tinctures. They are, and they are proud of it.

“Our mission hasn’t changed. We believe in the power of hemp and craft everything we carry using the highest quality materials then sell them at low prices. We don’t take shortcuts, no matter which cannabinoids we’re working with,” said Boatman. 

So how does a company that sells Broad Spectrum CBD Multivitamin and Immunity gummies also sell powerful delta 8 edibles with ease? “Our slogan is: Hemp Wellness Redefined. It is about taking care of yourself and feeling good, not just physical support. Many people enjoy cannabis recreationally as a form of self-care in a chaotic and stressful modern world. How is that not wellness?”

Experience your own float down the river. Browse Canna River’s full suite of premium lab tested hemp products at CannaRiver.com, and be sure to join their loyalty program for even deeper discounts on their already low prices. 

The post Recreation or Wellness? At Canna River, They’re the Same. appeared first on High Times.

What Does Federal Appeals Court Ruling Mean for Delta-8 THC?

Delta-8 THC gets a lot of attention as an intoxicating cannabis agent, that’s separate from the delta-9 we know and love. Now this attention has expanded to a federal court, which may, or may not, push Congress to do something to clarify. So, what’s the deal with the recent federal appeals court ruling, and what does it mean for the future of delta-8 THC?

New federal appeals court ruling on delta-8 THC creates even more confusion over the legality of this compound. How will Congress react to this? Keep watching life to find out! We’re an independent news publication focusing on the cannabis and psychedelics industries. To stay current on everything important happening, subscribe to The THC Weekly Newsletter. Also, it’ll get you premium access to deals on cannabis flowers, vapes, edibles, and much more! We’ve also got standout offers on cannabinoids, like HHC-O, Delta 8Delta 9 THCDelta-10 THCTHCOTHCVTHCP HHC, which won’t kill your bank account. Head over to our “Best-of” lists to get these deals, and remember to enjoy responsibly!


The ruling

First and foremost, when getting into a lawsuit, it’s important to know what the lawsuit is about. Not everything is a criminal trial, or involves someone getting busted for using a drug. Though court cases often spawn inflammatory headlines, the actual case doesn’t always match the hype of the headlines. If the goal is to understand the world around, then these discrepancies are wildly important.

That said, the reason this came up, is because the company AK Futures took the company Boyd Street Distro to court on trademark infringement charges, saying Boyd Street Distro was selling counterfeit versions of AK Futures’ delta-8 “Cake” vape carts.

Why does this matter to the rest of us? Because you can’t trademark an illegal product. Therefore, a federal appeals court ruling of 3-0 by the The Ninth Circuit panel in San Francisco, that AK Futures can trademark the delta-8 vapes, means that it’s saying those vape carts are legal. However, this is still only a trademark case, not a case meant to set case law for the use of delta-8 products, which it most certainly did not do. The FDA regulates all consumable products, so though it might be legal to have and produce these vape carts according to the judgment, the ruling makes no decision on the legality of using them.

If this sounds weird, or even a bit silly and backwards, it most certainly is! But it’s also not uncommon, and highlights the contradictory nature of many laws. For example, magic mushroom spores are legal to buy and sell in most places because they don’t have psilocybin and psilocin in them, yet it’s illegal to grow them into mushrooms. Or check out the country Georgia, where cannabis is legal for use, but not to buy, sell, or grow. A similar issue to the latter shows up in tons of places, like Italy, where possession of cannabis is illegal, but use is not.

Technically, the court is saying that because the 2018 Farm Bill opened the door to hemp derivatives, that delta-8 is therefore a legal, and trademarkable product. This does go in contrast to recent actions taken by the FDA, in which letters were sent out specifically to delta-8 companies, telling them to stop illegal operations. But there are some things to consider when looking at a news story like this, because when it comes to the biggest issue regarding whether delta-8 products should be considered legal, it doesn’t touch the subject, because it wasn’t a part of the case.

What the ruling DOESN’T do

The ruling in no way legalizes use of delta-8 THC on a federal level, or on any specific state level. In fact, it makes no mention of this at all, as this was not what the suit was about. Lawsuits are specific, and generally geared to one particular point. The suit was only about one company’s ability to trademark a product, with the implications of what a trademark means for product legality as a corresponding aspect.

The other thing it most certainly didn’t do, is attack the idea of synthetically-made vs directly-extracted. When dealing with delta-8 THC, there are some basic things that should be understood, but which get incredibly confused in the press. The term ‘hemp-derived’, should mean ‘naturally-derived’, and that’s what’s it’s being sold as, as a way to say that delta-8 THC can come from a direct extraction of the hemp plant.

But the reality is that delta-8 is naturally produced in such tiny amounts that no delta-8 product sold is extracted from hemp directly. Instead they are all synthesized, making them ‘synthetically-derived’.

This is an important clarification, because whether or not you want to argue that delta-8 is legal under the Farm Bill, this would never account for synthetic versions. Synthetics are not a part of the Farm Bill, as the definition of ‘hemp’ only accounts for that which is derived directly from the plant. The moment synthetic processing comes in to create the compound, it’s no longer a product of hemp, and does not fall under the definition of hemp. Analogues of Schedule I substances are automatically Schedule I as well under the Federal Analogue Act.

hemp-derived delta-8 vs synthetic

The ruling made no mention of this, because it wasn’t a court case meant to examine the specifics of delta-8 production, or anything that goes with that. It therefore wasn’t important to this specific court if either company was making a real delta-8 product or a synthetic one, and since both sides can only be selling synthetics, it wasn’t a point either would want to enter into the argument, as it’s a reason for both sides to lose.

The court ruled on the idea of naturally-occurring delta-8 THC, but went no further to verify that the products were indeed direct extractions of the hemp plant. Which is partly because there’s no system of regulation set up to do so. No testing requirements exist, since apart from this ruling, it’s never been considered a trademarked, or officially legal, product before.

Does the ruling change anything?

Depends how you look at it. Delta-8 products are being sold regardless. They have been for a while now, and will continue to be. In fact, this will probably go on as long as consumers want to buy the products, and recent moves through Shopify and outgoing FDA letters haven’t stopped anything, even if losing Shopify did hurt sales a little (this is speculation as almost no sales data exists). The biggest thing the delta-8 industry has to deal with is the standard weed industry, whether legal or illegal, as most prefer the real thing. But that has nothing to do with the circus going on right now.

In terms of use, nothing was changed or legalized, so on a formal legal front, nothing is different for consumers. What the vape carts are expected to be for, if not for consumable use, is a great question, but their existence and ability for trademark does nothing to allow their legal use internally. In that sense, the industry trucks on how it’s been, and nothing is different at all.

But it does do something… The main line from federal government agencies is that delta-8 THC is illegal, hence the letters just sent out. And this ruling is a chink in the armor of that argument because it’s saying the products themselves are legal, and so is the ability to trademark them.

Much like inconsistent weed laws that allow use and not possession or sale, this judgement now does the same, saying delta-8 THC products are legal, even if you can’t consume them legally. Of course, we could then ask, ‘why would anyone want them?’, but I guess that becomes a question for another time.

delta-8 THC products

How the federal government will react presents an interesting story to follow. If it does nothing, it knows that chink in the armor will grow bigger. And if it fights it outwardly and publicly, it might have a big old losing battle on its hands. Perhaps that was even incentive for the federal appeals court ruling, in that the judges are probably aware of the difficultly of this situation for the federal government, and that their trademark case law for delta-8, could therefore stand.

For whatever reason they ruled, they made this statement, which sounds a bit taunting to me, “Regardless of the wisdom of legalizing delta-8 THC products, this court will not substitute its own policy judgment for that of Congress.” And that if there’s an issue with this, “then it is for Congress to fix its mistake.” If nothing else, it makes a statement that the court system does not feel the need to uphold Congress’ desires, which given the controversial nature of the subject, could make for some interesting cases in the future.

Conclusion

Most headlines make this story seem like more than it is, but it’s not nothing. Often change comes in small increments, and this ruling might represent one of those increments. The federal appeals court ruling did not legalize the consumable use of delta-8 THC, but it did rule that it’s a legal product, and one that can be trademarked.

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HHC, THC-O, and THC-P: New Compounds in Cannabis

Remember when the only compound we associated with the hemp plant was cannabidiol (CBD)? While CBD remains a mainstay of countless people’s daily routines, the industry has evolved exponentially in the last several years, and the result has been a market and brands such as Binoid that now offers a wide array of cannabinoids that are both federally legal and rich in must-try properties, with many of them being delightfully psychoactive.

Binoid is one of the best brands in the new Delta 8 cannabinoid space. Make sure to check them out and use our code HIGHTIMES25 for 25% off your order and fast, free shipping to the entire United States. Now, let’s shed light on some of these newer cannabinoids and what they can offer.

Courtesy of Binoid

Where do all of These Awesomely New Cannabinoids Keep Coming From?

We have a tendency to forget that there are, in fact, well over 100 individual cannabinoids found in any given sample of hemp. The majority of these cannabinoids are classified as minor, meaning that they exist in such trace levels that they seemingly have little impact on the plant’s properties and characteristics as a whole. But, to gloss over them would be a mistake, especially since we now have the technology to isolate and analyze them more thoroughly than ever before.

It’s because of today’s top brands such as Binoid as well as analysis methods, which largely revolve around liquid chromatography, that we’re able to both examine cannabinoids more effectively, and discover ones that up until now, we never knew existed. Pair that with the high demand for psychoactive hemp compounds that happen to be protected by federal law, and you can understand why we’re seeing one new cannabinoid enter the market after another.

Premium Hemp brands such as Binoid are known for having a large selection of cannabinoids such as Delta 8/10, Delta 9, HHC, HHC-O, THC-O, THC-P, and more! In fact, Binoid is one of the best brands to try these new compounds because of their amazing product selection, over 15,000 five star reviews, great customer service with 24/7 phone, email, and chat support as well as low prices on products and bundles. Binoid carries vape cartridges, gummies, tinctures, wax dabs, softgel capsules, and more that their loyal customers love.

HHC
Courtesy of Binoid

HHC

HHC (Hexahydrocannabinol) is one of those more recent discoveries, found in the pollen and seeds of the hemp plant. It’s a hydrogenated cannabinoid that’s phenomenally stable, but what hemp enthusiasts find more exciting is the fact that it behaves as almost a mirror image of delta 9 because of striking similarities in its chemical structure.

HHC is a psychoactive cannabinoid that many say is just a little milder than delta 9 in terms of its high, and it seems to offer all of the other effects that we associate with delta 9 which have to do with nausea, mood, physical discomfort, appetite, and the like.

HHC
Courtesy of Binoid

HHC-O

To make HHC a little more potent to better match the psychoactive nature of delta 9, it can be combined with acetic anhydride, a reagent that can reconfigure the cannabinoid’s structure to enhance, in this case, the cannabinoid’s intoxicating qualities and create HHC-O (HHC-O-Acetate).  HHC-O products are about 1.5 times more intoxicating than HHC, which doesn’t sound like much, but it in fact noticeably improves the high for more customer satisfaction. HHC-O is thought to be the closest you can get to real Delta 9 THC. 

HHC
Courtesy of Binoid

THC-O

THC-O (THC-O acetate) is one of the better-known newer cannabinoids on the market, but in reality, it’s not actually new at all. Developed by the military in the mid-20th century, it was the original compound to be produced by combining a naturally occurring cannabinoid—in this case, THC—with acetic anhydride. THC-O products are three times as intoxicating as regular old delta 9, and that’s pretty potent, to say the least. Its high is extremely euphoric, and many say that the body high is out of this world. THC-O is known as the “psychedelic cannabinoid,” and its effects usually take 30 to 45 minutes to kick in. 

HHC
Courtesy of Binoid

THC-P

If you thought THC-O was a powerful psychoactive, wait until you get your hands on THC-P (tetrahydrocannabiphorol). This is a naturally occurring cannabinoid found in extremely trace amounts in the hemp plant—so trace that it was only discovered a little over two years ago thanks to more advanced analysis methods. THC-P products are about 10 times as psychoactive as delta 9 THC, making it the strongest intoxicating cannabinoid that we know of so far. Like THC-O, its high seems to promise phenomenal levels of euphoria.

THCV

THCV (Tetrahydrocannabivarin) has actually been steadily researched since its discovery in 1973, but it’s only become a subgenre of the hemp market recently. THCV products are tricky because their high is only achievable after consuming a somewhat heavy dosage amount, and even then, the intoxicating effects are only mild.  But THCV has other tricks up its sleeve—primarily, it has been shown in studies to potentially regulate blood sugar, fat metabolization, and other metabolic processes.

Delta 8/Delta 10

Delta 8 and delta 10 THC have both been on the market for longer than the rest of these newer cannabinoids, but they remain big favorites among hemp enthusiasts as the cannabinoid market continues to grow and evolve. Delta 8 and delta 10 products are both about 70% as psychoactive as delta 9 THC. Delta 8 is known for its more relaxing effects, making it a great cannabinoid for evening. Delta 10, meanwhile, offers something of the opposite kind of high, offering an uplifting buzz that can give people a boost of motivation, focus, and even creativity.  

Delta 9 THC

Delta 9 THC has arrived on the legal hemp market, being fully federally compliant by containing a maximum of 0.3% delta 9 per dry weight, which is exactly what the law allows. But, don’t be fooled by that low percentage—federally compliant delta 9 comes in the form of gummies and edibles that contain large enough portion sizes that the 0.3% comes out to a meaningful amount, which in our case is 10 milligrams per piece—plenty to give you the high that you’re looking for. Legal delta 9 gummies such as Binoid’s come with a full spectrum entourage of compounds such as CBC, CBG, CBN, and more.

CBDA/CBGA

Then, we have the non-psychoactive cannabinoids—CBDA and CBGA, or cannabidiolic acid and cannabigerolic acid, respectively. These cannabinoids are actually CBD and CBG in their raw, pre-decarboxylated forms—in other words, they’re what you’d consume if you were to eat the raw flowers of hemp rather than smoking or vaporizing them. These raw cannabinoids have been shown to offer a lot of value, which is fascinating, since we’ve always been told that cannabinoids aren’t worth much until they’ve been heated to a certain temperature, which “activates” their key properties.

CBDA and CBGA have been researched to a surprising extent over the years, and they’re seeing a huge surge in demand thanks to a recent study, done only in January of this year, showing that when taken together, they can bond to virus spike proteins and restructure it to prevent it from absorbing into cells of the body, giving it the stunning potential to prevent the virus from entering the lung tissue.

Binoid: Your One-Stop Resource for the Latest Cannabinoid-Based Products

All of these cannabinoids are completely accessible to anyone who wants to dive into them—not to mention federally legal. And Binoid is at the cutting edge of the latest cannabinoids to come from the hemp plant, offering a generous variety of formulas that are developed to ensure maximum absorption into the body for incredibly satisfying effects.

You can get your hands on any of these amazing cannabinoids above at Binoid, and use them with the confidence that you have nothing but the highest quality possible. That’s because we have all of our cannabinoid extracts tested by a third-party, state-licensed laboratory, where they’re analyzed for purity levels, potency, and more. Not only that, but we make a point to share every ingredient we use in our formulas with our customers, so you can see for yourself that we choose to stick to natural, plant-based ingredients whenever possible.

Best of all, you have your pick of a huge selection of product types, including vape cartridges, disposable vapes, tinctures, gummies, capsules, and even dabs/concentrates.

More and more hemp enthusiasts are opting for Binoid delta 8 products, not only for their exceptional quality but also because of their price. We produce everything in-house, and this allows us to save quite a bit on manufacturing. This way, our prices are some of the most affordable on the market. At the same time, we offer free, discreet shipping that’s faster than the competition, and 24/7 customer service to address any and all of your needs as a customer.

If you’re ready to explore some of these newer cannabinoids, choose Binoid as your retailer of choice with our unique code HIGHTIMES25 for 25% off. With these Binoid products, you know you’re getting the full capabilities of these compounds at some of the best prices around. 

The post HHC, THC-O, and THC-P: New Compounds in Cannabis appeared first on High Times.

Does Delta 8 THC Get You High? Unicorn Brands Says Yes

Long story short, yes, according to Unicorn Brands. Short story long, also yes, but with a longer explanation. The battle of the cannabinoids that surfaced with the legalization of the farm bill in 2017 has played out in many arenas and across many different platforms. The explosion of interest in both traditional cannabis and CBD has pushed growers from the traditional side to hit potency numbers only Evil Kenevial himself would dare to try. With the correlation between potency numbers and price tags, THC growers have found themselves between a rock and hard place: Continue to pump up numbers, or risk being labeled as “overpriced.” Enter stage left: Delta 8 THC.

Delta 8 THC is the new kid on the block, the trust fund kid who never had to work, the guy who seems to have it all. No doubt the Delta 8 market has piggybacked off of the traditional market, but in doing so, it exposed something, a crack in the armor. Delta 8 THC gets you high (kinda); it gets you juuuuust high enough to soothe you off to sleep, to help with that sore back, to chill you out before your next big test (enter your favorite acronym here) and is gone just in time for you to slip silently into the night, leaving you refreshed, fulfilled, and craving more.

So Why Delta 8?

In general, Delta 8 THC is known for hitting all the rights and very little of the wrongs. Most agree it won’t make you groggy or “couch locked,” and it generally doesn’t have the hungry, hungry hippo effect. All this is starting to sound like a fantasy and made up so…

Where Is The Best Place To Buy Delta 8?

Enter stage left—I mean right, Unicorn Brand. Unicorn Brand is an Emerald Triangle-based company that specializes in High. Quality. Fun. Delta 8 THC, HHC, and THCO. Unicorn’s product selection ranges from Delta 8-infused flower to Delta 8 gummies that will rock your world. There is something available for everyone’s style.

Courtesy of Unicorn Brands

Delta 8 Flower

For the consumers looking for the most effective way to consume not only Delta 8 THC, but any cannabinoid, nothing beats the good ole’ farm fresh Delta 8 THC flower in your favorite smoking apparatus. While there are many options, Unicorn Brand carries a wide variety of strains that fit almost anyone’s needs including smalls, bigs, mids, and the coveted new strains every harvest year. Each of the cultivars produced and sold by Unicorn Brand come with our distinct flavor profile and experience. And with the brand focusing on High. Quality. Fun, it is almost certain that you will start to feel the magic as soon as you open the box.

Unicorn Brands
Courtesy of Unicorn Brands

Delta 8 Smalls

A derivative of the bigs, the Delta 8 THC smalls offered by the brand deliver a powerful punch of the elevating cannabinoid, which also hits at a lower price point and is perfect for those Sunday Funday smoke sessions or to purchase a product that is super easy to roll up and enjoy with the “at home” style pre-rolls.

Delta 8 Pre-Rolls

For those of us who are on the go or do not want to roll up the Js, Unicorn Brand’s wide variety of Delta 8 THC pre-rolls deliver an intoxicating combination of Delta 8 THC, your favorite strain, and in some cases, a premium coat of keif. Delta 8 THC pre-rolls are that perfect combination of High. Quality. Fun. that everyone is searching for right now. These will have anyone flying with the unicorns in no time!

Courtesy of Unicorn Brands

Delta 8 Gummies

Ah yes, the age-old true warrior test, the infamous edibles. Will they work? Did I eat too much? Not enough? Who the F%*& knows! Welcome to the world of delta 8 THC gummies. Unicorn Brand offers tantalizing flavors, packed with a unicorn level of delta 8 THC. Each gummy has 25mg of the secret sauce that will leave you wondering what planet you are on. Gummies are an excellent option for folks who are looking for that smooth and powerful climb up the mountain. Who’s ready to play roulette? Time to spin the wheel and see where we end up!

The post Does Delta 8 THC Get You High? Unicorn Brands Says Yes appeared first on High Times.

FDA Going After Delta-8 Companies

It was coming. We knew it by Shopify. And whatever happened is probably just the beginning of the story. We know the government isn’t thrilled about the cannabinoid industry, and now its making its first big, direct move, by using the FDA to go after delta-8 THC companies.

The FDA going after delta-8 companies is a predictable move, but who knows how this will end. We specialize in cannabis and psychedelics reporting, which you can follow along with by signing up for the THC Weekly Newsletter. You’ll also get prime access to deals on an array of cannabis products like vapes, edibles, and smoking paraphernalia. Plus, we’ve got tons of cannabinoid compounds like delta-8 THC as well. Please remember, *cannabinoid compounds are not preferred by everyone. We only support people buy products they are comfortable with.


What’s the news?

The CBD industry is already aware of how much the FDA doesn’t like it. The FDA has sent out letters to tons of companies over the years, reminding them about federal laws, and to stop producing and selling products that go against them. For the most part, this hasn’t had the biggest impact, and CBD, which is now cleared for medical use by the UN via updates to the Single Convention, is found pretty much everywhere.

On May 4th, 2022, the FDA made its first big, direct move in the cannabinoid space, by sending out warning letters to delta-8 companies, warning them that the products they are producing and selling, violate federal law. Five companies were targeted thus far, but perhaps more will receive letters in the future. After all, Shopify had to remove a lot of products, and the very same vendors are the targets of such letters.

The companies targeted by the FDA for their delta-8 products, are ATLRx Inc., BioMD Plus LLC, Delta 8 Hemp, Kingdom Harvest LLC, and M Six Labs Inc. These warning letters don’t leave CBD out, making mention of the company violations on that front too. According to Jonathan Havens, co-chair of Saul Ewing Arnstein & Lehr’s Cannabis Law Practice and the Food and Beverage Practice, “the five warning letters represent the first enforcement actions taken by FDA against delta-8 marketers.”

Part of the issue has to do with medical claims. According to the government agency, there are no approved drugs that contain delta-8, and so using delta-8 to make any claim for a medication, means making an unapproved claim, for a drug which is also unapproved. The FDA also attacked the idea of the mis-branding of products, with the complaints of not giving good enough instructions, as well as putting delta-8 in food products.

Said FDA Principal Deputy Commissioner, Janet Woodcock, “The FDA is very concerned about the growing popularity of delta-8 THC products being sold online and in stores nationwide… These products often include claims that they treat or alleviate the side effects related to a wide variety of diseases or medical disorders, such as cancer, multiple sclerosis, chronic pain, nausea and anxiety. It is extremely troubling that some of the food products are packaged and labeled in ways that may appeal to children. We will continue to safeguard Americans’ health and safety by monitoring the marketplace and taking action when companies illegally sell products that pose a risk to public health.”

Of course, delta-8 THC has, indeed, been found useful for all the conditions mentioned, which does beg the question of why the government is trying so hard to protect its population from these compounds, especially in light of the no-death count attached. It has repeatedly been shown that additive products are the real main issue, and that cannabis compounds have yet to be associated with death. This is important because another government agency, the CDC, just requested to lower prescribing guidelines for opioids, which already kill as many as 70,000+ a year, even as other non-addictive, no death-toll measures like ketamine and cannabis, exist.

How did this come about?

This newer issue is a counterpart to the CBD issue, which has been going on for awhile now. The cannabinoid industry, led by delta-8 THC, is based on the idea of extracting cannabinoids from the hemp plant for use in products. But there’s a problem with this. Though some of the compounds can technically be extracted from hemp, like delta-8, they can only be extracted in tiny amounts, so that for product production, synthetic processes must be used. This takes these products out from under the definition of hemp, making them federally illegal.

CBD on the other hand, can be extracted in large enough quantities that the same issue of synthetics isn’t relevant. However, neither is cleared by the US federal government for internal use, and the only reason there’s a conversation, is as a result of the 2018 US Farm Bill. The bill instituted a new definition for hemp, in order to promote the industrial hemp industry. In so doing, it separated high-THC cannabis from low-THC cannabis, and defined ‘hemp’ as only certain parts of the actual plant, without including synthetics. It should be noted, however, that even though the US government says CBD is not legal in this way, it did approve epidiolex, a big-pharma synthetic version of CBD. It has also approved synthetic versions of THC (dronabinol).

Synthetics of any Schedule I substance (which are not big-pharma made and approved), are also Schedule I under the Federal Analogue Act. When compounds are made using synthetic processes, or that don’t exist in nature (delta-10), they are not covered under the definition of hemp. Nor is anything (plant or product) that has over .3% delta-9 THC.

hemp

Two of the many issues with the cannabinoid market, are that large amounts of delta-9 THC are often found in products, and that synthetic processing is used to make them. Though the industry uses the term ‘hemp-derived’, this only means that some aspect of it came from the hemp plant, although in reality, even this isn’t necessarily true. As the industry is not regulated, we simply don’t know what we’re buying, and that presents its own problem.

Though regulating the market could settle much of this, the federal government doesn’t want to do that. But it also doesn’t want to lose tax revenue, and that creates a conundrum. The government tends to take money from big pharma, not little mom-and-pop, so anything that can’t be transformed into pharmaceutical profits easily, isn’t desired by the government. It’s just like with Quaaludes, which were too easily made outside of pharma companies, making for a black market that the US couldn’t control.

What else has been done?

The FDA sending warning letters to delta-8 companies is the first big, above-board move by a government agency to try to stop this industry, but it wasn’t the first move made. A couple months ago, the biggest shopping sales platform, Shopify, started sending out its own similar letters, telling vendors they could not sell products with more than .3% delta-9 THC, and that they had to be in general compliance with federal law, which also rules out synthetics. Thus, tons of companies were affected.

Shopify didn’t stop with letters, and immediately forced companies to drop products from their online catalogues, that don’t meet regulation. This most certainly was a hit to the industry, though the lack of overall sales figures in general, makes it hard to know how much. Cannabinoid products are sold all over the place, and show up in a lot of small roadside stores. How much the industry relied on on-line sales, particularly from Shopify, is not clear.

Shopify didn’t make a statement about the US government making it do this. Nor did the US government make a statement about being involved in the Shopify issue. But most companies won’t shoot themselves in the foot if they don’t have to, and it’s hard to believe that Shopify would all of a sudden care about something it never cared about before. This was not an ongoing fight, but a directive that came out of nowhere. It suffices to say there was likely pressure from higher up, and that Shopify itself could have been shut down if it didn’t comply.

Are these products dangerous?

The US government hasn’t legalized cannabis yet, but we already know that that specific legalization is not what determines the safety of the plant. So regardless of whether something is federally illegal or not, whether it’s dangerous or not is an entirely different question. It’s almost joke level funny that Ms. Woodcock would speak about the dangers of compounds with no death toll, while close to 100,000 people die a year from government sanctioned opioids.

opioids

On top of that idea, the US government is getting close to passing a bill to legalize cannabis, whether it wants to call it a ‘legalization’, or a ‘decriminalization’. The MORE Act already passed the House and is now up for the Senate. And if that doesn’t make it, Senate Majority leader Chuck Schumer has his own baby, the Cannabis Administration and Opportunity Act, which he’s carefully shopping around for support, and which hasn’t been officially offered, so as not to run out the clock prematurely.

Though a lot of reasons could be given for why the federal government is working hard now to pass something, one of the biggest reasons is that it must play catch-up with its states, so as not to seem powerless. Legalization measures are moving in only one direction, and its away from federal mandate. Soon enough, more and bigger publications, will point out how few people actually live under federal law concerning cannabis at this point. And as the government can no longer stop this train, it must now get on it, and pretend that was always the goal.

Conclusion

How much of an effect these FDA letters will have on the delta-8 industry is not known, and it might take some time to see results. The US government is obviously frustrated, but it’s also not in a position of power considering failed drug wars, and the lack of danger associated with this particular drug.

Maybe the delt-8 market isn’t the most savory. Maybe there are problems associated. But if the government really wanted to protect its people, it would do something substantial about the opioid epidemic, instead of railing against a plant (or its synthetic counterparts) which doesn’t realistically hurt anyone.

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The post FDA Going After Delta-8 Companies appeared first on CBD Testers.

Georgia’s War on Delta-8 THC

Leigh Ann LaDuke was picking up her kids from school on the afternoon of Friday, March 4, when she heard the police had paid her business a visit while she was out. LaDuke is the sales manager of The Shoppe, a vape-supply and CBD store in Fort Oglethorpe, GA. In addition to CBD oil and tinctures, vaporizer batteries and e-juices, The Shoppe also stocked products containing Delta-8 THC.

An increasingly common and somewhat controversial cannabinoid, Delta-8 THC is derived from source material originating in the federally legal hemp plant. However, since Delta-8 produces a high similar to federally illegal cannabis’ Delta-9 THC—and since you can buy it online, at smoke shops, gas stations or anywhere else a merchant stocks it on shelves—Delta-8 products are popular in states where cannabis is still illegal, such as Georgia

This also means Delta-8 is very unpopular with law enforcement. And in at least three jurisdictions in Georgia, local sheriff’s offices and district attorneys appear to have launched an all-out assault on Delta-8 THC—despite state and federal laws allowing the drug, advocates and attorneys told Cannabis Now. 

It all adds up to what increasingly looks like a desperate, last-ditch War on Drugs battle in the final years before nationwide legalization, waged by what even a state judge worries are “rogue” law enforcement officials.

The Letter and the Law

Upon her return to work, LaDuke discovered a letter left from a detective from the local Catoosa County Sheriff’s Office. The communication, signed by Catoosa County Sheriff Gary R. Sisk, informed her that sheriff’s representatives had “purchased items from your store and had them tested,” and that they contained a “significate [sic] level of Delta 9.”

“It’s your responsibility to know what you are selling and what it contains especially when I’m telling you it’s a violation of Georgia law,” Sisk’s letter continued, adding that The Shoppe had until April 30 to remove “these illegal items” and if they didn’t, “We already have the evidence needed to move forward with prosecutions and seizures.” 

Puzzled and upset, LaDuke and Joe King, owner of The Shoppe, went to the sheriff’s office to sort things out. They had certificates of authentication showing their products were well within state limits, which say anything derived from hemp, cannabis with 0.3% Delta-9 THC or less, is legal to sell.

They were told that the county has an ongoing problem with “people actively overdosing on cannabis.” The sheriff’s office had purchased products from The Shoppe and sent them off for their own testing, and “they tested higher than the Georgia law allowed,” said LaDuke, who didn’t believe a word of what she heard.  

“We asked for proof and what was purchased that day, and we were refused,” she said. “We also offered COAs for our products and were told that ours do not matter because they tested our products.” 

The Catoosa Sheriff’s Office didn’t  return a call for comment to Cannabis Now. But according to Ryan Ralston, the executive director of Peachtree NORML, the Georgia branch of the organization, The Shoppe is one of several stores in at least three Georgia jurisdictions to be subjected to a Delta-8 crackdown: Gwinnett County, east of Atlanta; and Madison County, in northeast Georgia, in addition to Catoosa County, in the northwest of the state on the border with Tennessee.

In these places, local law enforcement seem to be waging a sort of war of choice, a last stand of the War on Drugs.

Rogue DAs and a Rearguard Action

“The vast majority, if not 99 percent, of the DAs and sheriffs and chiefs of police have recognized that Delta-8 is, in fact, lawful,” Ralston said. What’s happening, he says, is that “a couple of rogue DAs or sheriffs have taken it upon themselves to declare Delta-8 unlawful and then [move to] take enforcement action.”

Ralston has a theory on why this is ramping up now.

“You have the reinvention of Reefer Madness here in Georgia,” he said.

Ralston noted that 2022 is an election year, and conservative sheriffs up for re-election (such as Sisk) may be trolling for a wedge issue. In several instances, law enforcement officials have claimed—so far, without showing any proof—that children have been accessing Delta-8 products. 

Others speculated that Sisk may also have encouragement from a local multi-jurisidictional drug task force. But what he doesn’t have is support from the state of Georgia itself. 

After Patsy Austin-Gatson, the district attorney in Gwinnett County, declared in January that selling Delta-8 was a felony offense and tried to enforce a county-wide ban—staging at least two raids, filing felony charges against at least one individual and seizing millions of dollars’ worth of product, according to estimates—two local vape shops sued to stop her. 

In response, a state judge imposed a monthlong restraining order, staying Austin-Gatson’s hand.

“I have concerns that this may or may not be a rogue DA,” said Judge Craig Schwall, according to the Atlanta Journal Constitution.

Austin-Gatson’s office didn’t return a telephone message to Cannabis Now seeking comment. 

Tom Church, one of the attorneys handling the cases on behalf of the offended vape shops, confirmed on April 22 that the monthlong temporary restraining orders imposed on Austin-Gatson, have been appealed by the state attorney general’s office. 

That means the legality of Delta-8 in Georgia may ultimately hinge on a judge’s order. In the meantime, Austin-Gatson has declared Delta-8 products OK if they’re not food products—meaning anyone selling Delta-8 gummies, possibly the drug’s most popular form, is still at risk, Church said.

“A lot of people are paying attention to this lawsuit, which is good—we need clarity in the law,” he said. “Of course, we think it’s unambiguous that Delta 8, Delta-10 and other cannabinoids as long as it’s not Delta-9 can be put in all types of products.”

The War on Drugs Continues in Georgia

In the meantime, The Shoppe is teetering on the brink of viability. Though the letter was the only warning LaDuke received, that was enough.

Rightly fearful of a raid, LaDuke and King pulled all their Delta-8 products, severely reducing their sales, but even that hasn’t ended their problems with the law. The Shoppe’s remaining customers “are getting pulled over” on their way in or out of the store, she said, further discouraging business. 

According to Peachtree NORML’s Ralston, the Delta-8 campaign could be a politically motivated distraction. All the areas where the crackdowns have occurred have something in common: violent crime rates “3% to 5% higher” than statewide rates, he said, plus the ever-worsening opioid overdose crisis. 

Looking decisive or tough on something easy—such as federally legal products sitting on a shelf in a store—might be a good way to direct attention elsewhere. The same week LaDuke received her letter, a neighboring county recorded five fentanyl overdoses, she said. 

“Yet, we’re the issue,” she said. “Busting several prominent businesses wouldn’t only make them look good, but fund them.”

“I feel like we’re all in a movie or a dream.”

The post Georgia’s War on Delta-8 THC appeared first on Cannabis Now.

FDA Sends Warning Letters to Businesses Improperly Selling Delta-8

The FDA recently sent letters with a new emphasis towards companies selling delta-8 THC products with purported benefits. 

Some of the companies sold pet products containing CBD, the announcement highlighted hemp-derived delta-8 products, marketed for human consumption. This marks the first time individual companies have received such a letter warning about delta-8 THC.

Specifically, the FDA says the products are marketed in ways that violate the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FD&C Act), and most of the concern surrounds medical claims on the labeling. Per the announcement, any delta-8 THC product claiming to “diagnose, cure, mitigate, treat, or prevent diseases” is considered an unapproved new drug. 

The FDA sends continual reminders that it has not evaluated whether unapproved delta-8 THC products are effective for medical claims, which involves dosages, interactions, or whether they have potentially dangerous side effects. These products can be found just about everywhere including gas stations and CBD shops.

“The FDA is very concerned about the growing popularity of delta-8 THC products being sold online and in stores nationwide. These products often include claims that they treat or alleviate the side effects related to a wide variety of diseases or medical disorders, such as cancer, multiple sclerosis, chronic pain, nausea, and anxiety,” said FDA Principal Deputy Commissioner Janet Woodcock, M.D. 

“It is extremely troubling that some of the food products are packaged and labeled in ways that may appeal to children. We will continue to safeguard Americans’ health and safety by monitoring the marketplace and taking action when companies illegally sell products that pose a risk to public health.” 

The FDA recently published a consumer update giving a general warning to consumers about the potential health hazards of delta-8 THC products. 

“Several months ago, they came out with questions regarding delta-8 and made it clear that it was their opinion that ‘buyer beware,’ and that there are many unsafe delta-8 products here in the marketplace that are injuring people,” U.S. Hemp Roundtable’s General Counsel Jonathan Miller told High Times on the phone. “This is now step two in terms of sending out warning letters.” 

The U.S. Hemp Roundtable is a coalition of dozens of leading hemp companies and organizations committed to safer practices. The organization receives questions swirling around the murky topic of delta-8 THC regularly.

Should businesses that deal with delta-8 THC products be concerned? That depends. “I would not be surprised to see actual enforcement actions in the not-so-distant future. We’re seeing a tide of action right now at the state level, and I think that’s going to continue,” Miller said, but added that he expects the delta-8 THC market to continue to thrive in places such as adult-use markets. 

“The general consensus—maybe not from everybody—is that D8 products that use good manufacturing practices in adult-use marketplaces have a future,” Miller added. “I don’t think anyone’s talking about a ban of delta-8 products in the sense that delta-9 is banned, but I think those folks who are selling poorly manufactured products at gas stations without any controls should be forewarned that public policy is moving strongly against them.”

This applies to questionable psychoactive products that are sold in stores that are generally not authorized to do so. “Stop making medical claims, use good manufacturing practices and sell them in adult-use marketplaces,” he said.

Regarding hemp products, the FDA went on to remind that Epidiolex alone has been fully approved at all levels for medical claims. Even Charlotte’s Web full-spectrum CBD extract was denied FDA approval as a dietary extract. 

The FDA issued individual warning letters to the following companies:

ATLRx Inc.
BioMD Plus LLC
Delta 8 Hemp
Kingdom Harvest LLC
M Six Labs Inc.

Businesses involved with delta-8 THC products should take note about the pattern the FDA is taking.

The post FDA Sends Warning Letters to Businesses Improperly Selling Delta-8 appeared first on High Times.

Georgia’s War on Delta-8 THC

Leigh Ann LaDuke was picking up her kids from school on the afternoon of Friday, March 4, when she heard the police had paid her business a visit while she was out. LaDuke is the sales manager of The Shoppe, a vape-supply and CBD store in Fort Oglethorpe, GA. In addition to CBD oil and tinctures, vaporizer batteries and e-juices, The Shoppe also stocked products containing Delta-8 THC.

An increasingly common and somewhat controversial cannabinoid, Delta-8 THC is derived from source material originating in the federally legal hemp plant. However, since Delta-8 produces a high similar to federally illegal cannabis’ Delta-9 THC—and since you can buy it online, at smoke shops, gas stations or anywhere else a merchant stocks it on shelves—Delta-8 products are popular in states where cannabis is still illegal, such as Georgia

This also means Delta-8 is very unpopular with law enforcement. And in at least three jurisdictions in Georgia, local sheriff’s offices and district attorneys appear to have launched an all-out assault on Delta-8 THC—despite state and federal laws allowing the drug, advocates and attorneys told Cannabis Now. 

It all adds up to what increasingly looks like a desperate, last-ditch War on Drugs battle in the final years before nationwide legalization, waged by what even a state judge worries are “rogue” law enforcement officials.

The Letter and the Law

Upon her return to work, LaDuke discovered a letter left from a detective from the local Catoosa County Sheriff’s Office. The communication, signed by Catoosa County Sheriff Gary R. Sisk, informed her that sheriff’s representatives had “purchased items from your store and had them tested,” and that they contained a “significate [sic] level of Delta 9.”

“It’s your responsibility to know what you are selling and what it contains especially when I’m telling you it’s a violation of Georgia law,” Sisk’s letter continued, adding that The Shoppe had until April 30 to remove “these illegal items” and if they didn’t, “We already have the evidence needed to move forward with prosecutions and seizures.” 

Puzzled and upset, LaDuke and Joe King, owner of The Shoppe, went to the sheriff’s office to sort things out. They had certificates of authentication showing their products were well within state limits, which say anything derived from hemp, cannabis with 0.3% Delta-9 THC or less, is legal to sell.

They were told that the county has an ongoing problem with “people actively overdosing on cannabis.” The sheriff’s office had purchased products from The Shoppe and sent them off for their own testing, and “they tested higher than the Georgia law allowed,” said LaDuke, who didn’t believe a word of what she heard.  

“We asked for proof and what was purchased that day, and we were refused,” she said. “We also offered COAs for our products and were told that ours do not matter because they tested our products.” 

The Catoosa Sheriff’s Office didn’t  return a call for comment to Cannabis Now. But according to Ryan Ralston, the executive director of Peachtree NORML, the Georgia branch of the organization, The Shoppe is one of several stores in at least three Georgia jurisdictions to be subjected to a Delta-8 crackdown: Gwinnett County, east of Atlanta; and Madison County, in northeast Georgia, in addition to Catoosa County, in the northwest of the state on the border with Tennessee.

In these places, local law enforcement seem to be waging a sort of war of choice, a last stand of the War on Drugs.

Rogue DAs and a Rearguard Action

“The vast majority, if not 99 percent, of the DAs and sheriffs and chiefs of police have recognized that Delta-8 is, in fact, lawful,” Ralston said. What’s happening, he says, is that “a couple of rogue DAs or sheriffs have taken it upon themselves to declare Delta-8 unlawful and then [move to] take enforcement action.”

Ralston has a theory on why this is ramping up now.

“You have the reinvention of Reefer Madness here in Georgia,” he said.

Ralston noted that 2022 is an election year, and conservative sheriffs up for re-election (such as Sisk) may be trolling for a wedge issue. In several instances, law enforcement officials have claimed—so far, without showing any proof—that children have been accessing Delta-8 products. 

Others speculated that Sisk may also have encouragement from a local multi-jurisidictional drug task force. But what he doesn’t have is support from the state of Georgia itself. 

After Patsy Austin-Gatson, the district attorney in Gwinnett County, declared in January that selling Delta-8 was a felony offense and tried to enforce a county-wide ban—staging at least two raids, filing felony charges against at least one individual and seizing millions of dollars’ worth of product, according to estimates—two local vape shops sued to stop her. 

In response, a state judge imposed a monthlong restraining order, staying Austin-Gatson’s hand.

“I have concerns that this may or may not be a rogue DA,” said Judge Craig Schwall, according to the Atlanta Journal Constitution.

Austin-Gatson’s office didn’t return a telephone message to Cannabis Now seeking comment. 

Tom Church, one of the attorneys handling the cases on behalf of the offended vape shops, confirmed on April 22 that the monthlong temporary restraining orders imposed on Austin-Gatson, have been appealed by the state attorney general’s office. 

That means the legality of Delta-8 in Georgia may ultimately hinge on a judge’s order. In the meantime, Austin-Gatson has declared Delta-8 products OK if they’re not food products—meaning anyone selling Delta-8 gummies, possibly the drug’s most popular form, is still at risk, Church said.

“A lot of people are paying attention to this lawsuit, which is good—we need clarity in the law,” he said. “Of course, we think it’s unambiguous that Delta 8, Delta-10 and other cannabinoids as long as it’s not Delta-9 can be put in all types of products.”

The War on Drugs Continues in Georgia

In the meantime, The Shoppe is teetering on the brink of viability. Though the letter was the only warning LaDuke received, that was enough.

Rightly fearful of a raid, LaDuke and King pulled all their Delta-8 products, severely reducing their sales, but even that hasn’t ended their problems with the law. The Shoppe’s remaining customers “are getting pulled over” on their way in or out of the store, she said, further discouraging business. 

According to Peachtree NORML’s Ralston, the Delta-8 campaign could be a politically motivated distraction. All the areas where the crackdowns have occurred have something in common: violent crime rates “3% to 5% higher” than statewide rates, he said, plus the ever-worsening opioid overdose crisis. 

Looking decisive or tough on something easy—such as federally legal products sitting on a shelf in a store—might be a good way to direct attention elsewhere. The same week LaDuke received her letter, a neighboring county recorded five fentanyl overdoses, she said. 

“Yet, we’re the issue,” she said. “Busting several prominent businesses wouldn’t only make them look good, but fund them.”

“I feel like we’re all in a movie or a dream.”

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