New Record Set for 4/20 Sales, According to Data from Akerna

Sales data was released by Akerna on April 26 in a flash report, which shared that the industry collected a total of $154.4 million in combined recreational and medical cannabis sales. Akerna reports that 2021 sales records previously held the record for most cannabis sales on 4/20.

In the weekend following up to 4/20 (April 15-April 20), retail sales varied greatly. The highest sales day, other than 4/20, was Friday, April 15 at $94.3 million, and the lowest was Sunday, April 17 at $38.9 million. The entire weekend netted a total of $485.3 million.

Akerna originally released a prediction report on April 12, projecting that cannabis sales on 4/20 would hit $130 million, and that total weekend sales would rise up to $494 million. The company’s projections were very close to early sales data. “Using our historical Akerna data, we released a prediction report that the period around 420 would bring in a total of $494 million, only –1.79% variance from the actual sales of $485.3 million,” said Akerna Business Intelligence Architect James Ahrendt. “This is a testament to the power of our data analytics. By leveraging data-driven insights, cannabis businesses can make strategic predictions and decisions for their businesses.”

Akerna was formed when MJ Freeway and MTech merged in 2019, but it was initially founded in 2010 in response to the growing need for software to support “visibility, data and analytics, and robust inventory tracking that the cannabis industry requires to be successful.” Akerna’s most recent data is defined as a “flash report” that “looks at buying trends in the cannabis market as captured by Akerna’s flagship solution, MJ Platform,” Akerna shared in a press release.

The success of this year’s cannabis sales is impressive. Akerna mentions that the Iowa Alcoholic Beverages Division reported that it had the largest year for liquor sales, having surpassed $400 million for the first time, and in that perspective, showcases the strength of the cannabis industry.

More data is soon to come, it remains to be seen if Akerna’s other cannabis-related predictions were also accurate. The company projected that the hierarchy of product popularity, starting at the top with flower (48.11%), followed by cartridge/pens (31.66%), concentrates (11.63%), edibles (6.87%), infused non-edible (0.71%) and non-medicated (1.01%).

By demographic, the company predicted that 59.93% of consumers would be men, with 40.07% women. In age ranges, most consumers would be between 30-40 years old (30.43%), under 30 (28.38%), 40-50 (19.92%), 50-60 (11.49%), and over 60 (9.78%).

This data is echoed across the board with other data analytic companies, such as Headset, which shared that sales in U.S. cannabis dispensaries were up by 148% on 4/20 compared to other days leading up to the holiday. Canada sales grew as well, as the average cannabis stores increasing in sales by 65%. Headset also noted that cannabis-infused beverages rose considerably by 110% in Canada and by 176% in the U.S. as the top performing category. The “second place” product was attributed to edibles in Canada (with 83% sales growth) and concentrates in the U.S. (with 155% sales growth).

Although most states have not released any preliminary sales data, Michigan’s Cannabis Regulatory Agency Director Andrew Brisbo shared some information about the success of his state’s 4/20 sales on Twitter on April 21. “Consumers purchased over 2.3 tons of marijuana flower in MI retailers yesterday. Initial data shows overall sales of flower on 4/20 in 2022 were up 242% from the same day in 2021 (which were up 444% vs 2020).” He also followed with an estimation of pounds sold in the last three years in Michigan: 2022 (4,619 pounds), 2021 (1,912 pounds) and 2020 (430 pounds).

The post New Record Set for 4/20 Sales, According to Data from Akerna appeared first on High Times.

Rutgers University Report Examines Cannabis Consumption Data

A new study conducted by Rutgers University in New Jersey compiles data on cannabis consumption in relation to gender, age, and race.

On February 14, Rutgers New Jersey State Policy Lab released a public study that examined various cannabis consumption trends of state residents. Entitled “Cannabis Legalization in New Jersey: A Baseline Study,” this nearly 100-page document spans a wide variety of observations.

“In this report, we examine education, health, and law enforcement factors as they relate to youth and adults with respect to marijuana usage directly and indirectly. That is, we include variables that could be impacted by the legalization of recreational marijuana,” the study states in its executive summary. Although it claims to be the first study of its kind in New Jersey, it also points out that other states with more mature cannabis legalization industries produce similar data on an annual basis. It also shares that the data was pulled from multiple secondary sources, and cautions readers when considering the presented information.

One of the study’s key findings includes the breakdown of consumption by sex and age. The overall percentage of men (45.2 percent in New Jersey) and women (35.8 percent in New Jersey, and 39.6 percent in the US) who consume cannabis is slightly lower than the national average (48.6 percent and 39.6 percent respectively), according to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Data Archives 2021. Between 2016-2019, data also reflects that the male/female breakdown was divided by 49.3 percent and 50.7 percent.

In terms of age ranges between 2016-2019, data showed that consumption for adults over age 26 increased, whereas usage decreased for the 18-25 age range. Youth consumption, including anyone between 12-17 years of age, also rose between 2017-2019 (about 70,000-78,000 individuals), which matched the overall national average.

According to Dean of Rutgers University-Newark School of Public Affairs and Administration Charles Menifield, one of the main goals of the study is also to identify if the New Jersey Cannabis Regulatory, Enforcement Assistance and Marketplace Modernization Act is being followed effectively. “This report is critical to New Jersey setting a model similar to other states in recognizing that all people in the state are not the same, and by legalizing cannabis, its impact on different communities is going to vary,” Menifield said. “[People] should care about this study because it’s going to have ramifications on healthcare outcomes, educational outcomes, and public safety.”

Menifield also shared that this data, as well as information gathered in the future, could help Rutgers University better understand the effects of cannabis consumption on students. “The argument we are making is that graduation rates could change based on cannabis use,” said Menifield. “If students start smoking and selling marijuana, they may drop out. Then the question becomes, who is dropping out? Where do they live? What city are they in? What county are they in? What’s their race? What’s the income level of their parents? So in order to ameliorate those situations, you need to know all of that other information.”

Additionally, Vandeen Campbell, assistant research professor with the Rutgers-Newark Department of Urban Education and Joseph C. Cornwall Center for Metropolitan Studies, explained that study should start now so that the data can be examined as the cannabis industry matures. “The disparities in exclusionary discipline practices are really important to highlight for students of color,” said Vandeen Campbell, an assistant research professor with the Rutgers-Newark Department of Urban Education and Joseph C. Cornwall Center for Metropolitan Studies, who also worked on the study. “We don’t know if legalization will be related to these rates in any way—we’ll have to study it—but that is certainly something that needs to be changed and needs to be monitored.”

The post Rutgers University Report Examines Cannabis Consumption Data appeared first on High Times.

Cannabis Companies Target Teens on Social Media, Study Claims

A new study with a modest sampling pool found that cannabis retail companies are not adhering to state restrictions on social media, and are targeting teens.

The study was published in the Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs recently and online on January 19, and found that many recreational cannabis companies market their products in a way that appeals to children and teens, “flouting state regulations.” A press release was released the following day.

The study, “A Content Analysis of Cannabis Company Adherence to Marketing Requirements in Four States,” provided an analysis of social media posts from cannabis companies in a handful of legal states. 

A team of researchers evaluated one year of publicly displayed posts on Facebook and Instagram by retail cannabis companies in four states—Alaska, Colorado, Oregon and Washington—and evaluated if companies adhered to restrictions on social media. 

Researchers looked for content that goes against restrictions, including branded promotions or discounts, modeling overconsumption, youth-focused messaging and health benefits. They also took a look at various state requirements.

They checked to see if companies displayed required warnings, including stating that cannabis is limited to people ages 21 and older, avoiding impaired driving and listing health risks.

But in the study, only 14 businesses were evaluated. Researchers evaluated 2,660 posts from those 14 businesses, to be exact. 

“I had expected that cannabis companies were unlikely to fully adhere to existing guidelines,” said lead author Megan Moreno, M.D., M.S.Ed., M.P.H., division chief of general pediatrics and adolescent medicine at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. “Some cannabis companies generated dozens of social media posts per day, and there is no current system in place to monitor or enforce these regulations. However, it was surprising to see how the presence of guidelines made a difference between states.”

What the Findings Show

Discounts or promotions were found in approximately 35 percent of the posts, researchers said. “Overconsumption” was found in 12 percent percent of all posts. Content containing warnings, “despite being required,” researchers said, were evident in less than half of all posts.

The researchers noted that Washington State, for example, prohibits displaying branded products, such as T-shirts with a company logo. But they found that about one percent of the posts on social media from Washington state cannabis companies ignored this restriction.

The research team did admit that “in states without this regulation, these types of posts appeared between five and 10 times more frequently. So while regulation did not guarantee compliance, it seemed to have an impact on how often companies shared content that may or may not be restricted.”

“As a pediatrician, I know that marketing and advertisements have a strong influence on kids and teens,” said Moreno. “Previous studies have shown how alcohol and tobacco companies’ marketing is associated with youth using these products.”

She continued, “Parents should talk with their kids about how cannabis companies seek to influence them by using youth-friendly approaches, like using cartoon characters and memes.”

The study was picked up by FOX23 News and ABC10 in New York at the time of writing.

Both Facebook and Instagram fall under the Meta umbrella, and we can’t help but wonder if studies such as this impact Meta policy. “I don’t think the results of this study have any impact on Meta censoring cannabis brands because they justify their actions by saying cannabis is federally illegal in the U.S. and therefore not allowed anywhere in the world, even in countries where it’s federally legal, like Canada,” ADCANN CEO Cody Hicks told High Times. ADCANN provides cannabis marketing tools, such as how to restore an Instagram account if it’s been disabled because of cannabis.

We Have Questions

If legal cannabis companies are targeting teens, it doesn’t appear to be working. A separate, broad study published in the JAMA Pediatrics—using data from national and state Youth Risk Behavior Surveys from 1993 to 2017, researchers from Montana State University, University of Oregon, University of Colorado–Denver and San Diego State University—examined states that had legalized medical and adult use cannabis and the likelihood of teen use (during the past 30 days).

The study analyzed data from 27 states and the District of Columbia, and seven states where adult use of cannabis is legal, during a 25-year time period. Adult-use cannabis laws were associated with a eight percent decrease in the likelihood of teens trying cannabis, as well as a nine percent reduction in the odds of frequent cannabis use, the study found. They found medical cannabis laws had no significant effect on teen cannabis use.

Usually, headlines about children and cannabis tend to pop up around Halloween, yearly. Bias focused on the harm (or benefits) of cannabis abounds in both clinical and nonclinical cannabis-related research.

The post Cannabis Companies Target Teens on Social Media, Study Claims appeared first on High Times.

Commercial Drivers Consume Cannabis More than Any Other Drug, Data Shows

Cannabis consumers who are aspiring to receive a commercial driver’s license (CDL) to drive trucks and other commercial vehicles should seriously consider the pros and cons of their career outlook. Data shows that commercial drivers are consuming cannabis more than any other drug, even if it can ruin their career.

Commercial drivers test positive for cannabis more often these days than any other drug, according to the latest data from the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA).

As you can imagine—federal restrictions on drugs for CDL holders are quite strict. With this in mind, drivers can face heavy punishments if they fail a drug test.

The most recent data shows that 98 percent of all positive drug screens in the first half of 2020 were for drugs and not alcohol. Only 892 CDL holders failed drug tests due to alcohol. That’s probably because alcohol detection tests can only measure alcohol in the blood for up to six hours, on the breath for 12-24 hours or in urine for 12-24 hours, while cannabis is detectable for weeks, or months in some cases.

The DOT mandates drug tests use urine samples only for typical pre-employment tests—so if you’re drunk one day, you can pass it the next. Cannabis on the other hand, lingers in fatty tissues and can trigger a positive result for much longer.

Over half, or 52 percent of the 40,433 tests came up positive for cannabis, which is currently legal in one form or another in most states. 

But the FMCSA doesn’t care about state laws. “The bottom line for CDL holders is you can’t use marijuana, even though you have states that allow people to use marijuana on a recreational basis,” said Larry Minor, the associate administrator for policy at the FMCSA.

If a CDL holder tests positive for cannabis on the first drug screen, they usually don’t lose their license, but repeat offenses are another story, or when an injury is involved. But failing a drug test for cannabis automatically ignites a long return-to-work process that is still considered to be a “career nightmare.” There are stories of drivers who still have their CDL but cannot find work over a brownie and a stain on their record.

Around half of the failed drug tests took place during the pre-employment drug screen. An additional 13,340 failed drug tests were randoms, and only about 1,700 failed drug screens were found following an accident.

The data matches existing data on drivers in general. Non-commercial drivers are also consuming cannabis at a faster pace.

Even CBD Is an Issue for Commercial Drivers

The FMCSA issued a Clearinghouse Update on May 27, reminding commercial motor vehicle drivers—who are regulated by the FMCSA—that they should exert caution when considering whether to consume even hemp and cannabidiol (CBD) products.

JD Supra reports on the critical updates that CDL drivers should know:

  1. The U.S. DOT requires testing for marijuana and not CBD.
  2. CBD product labeling is often misleading because the products could contain higher levels of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) than what’s stated on the product label.
  3. The U.S. DOT’s Drug and Alcohol Testing Regulation, 49 CFR Part 40, does not authorize the use of Schedule I drugs, including marijuana, for any reason.
  4. CBD use is not a legitimate medical explanation for a laboratory-confirmed cannabis positive result. Therefore, Medical Review Officers will verify a drug test confirmed at the appropriate cutoffs as positive, even if an employee claims they only used a CBD product.
  5. Since the use of CBD products could lead to a positive drug test result, U.S. DOT-regulated CDL drivers should exercise caution when considering whether to use CBD products.

Knowledge is power, especially when weighing the risks of consuming cannabis when a career is at stake.

The post Commercial Drivers Consume Cannabis More than Any Other Drug, Data Shows appeared first on High Times.

Thursday, January 30, 2020 Headlines | Marijuana Today Daily News

Marijuana Today Daily Headlines
Thursday, January 30, 2020 | Curated by host Shea Gunther

// Colorado Marijuana And Beer Companies Will Partner To Boost Energy Efficiency, Governor Announces (Marijuana Moment)

// Marijuana Regulatory Agency releases marijuana event rules (Huron Daily Tribune)

// Oklahoma Cannabis Market Outpaces That of Most States (New Cannabis Ventures)


These headlines are brought to you by Curaleaf, one of the leading vertically-integrated cannabis operators in the U.S. With legal medical marijuana dispensaries, cultivation sites, and processing facilities all over the United States, Curaleaf has served more than 165,000 medical cannabis patients and looks forward to helping many more long into the future. Swing over to Curaleaf.com to learn more about this very cool company!


// Marijuana law firm that helped Parnas and Fruman’s political rise cuts its ties (McClatchy DC)

// Eaze Insights- 2019 State of Cannabis report is here (Eaze)

// Berkeley Will Be the Next City in California to Allow Pot Consumption Lounges (Merry Jane)

// Santa Cruz Just Decriminalized All Natural Psychedelics (Merry Jane)

// Marijuana Tourism Will Boost Tax Revenue Illinois Governor Says In State Of The State Speech (Marijuana Moment)

// High Times Ditches Dreams of NASDAQ Listing (New Cannabis Ventures)

// MJBizDaily acquires The Emerald Conference to boost science reach (Marijuana Business Daily)


Check out our other projects:
Marijuana Today— Our flagship title, a weekly podcast examining the world of marijuana business and activism with some of the smartest people in the industry and movement.
Marijuana Media Connect— A service that connects industry insiders in the legal marijuana industry with journalists, bloggers, and writers in need of expert sources for their stories.

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Photo: Daniel Spiess/Flickr

Thursday, January 30, 2020 Headlines | Marijuana Today Daily News

Marijuana Today Daily Headlines
Thursday, January 30, 2020 | Curated by host Shea Gunther

// Colorado Marijuana And Beer Companies Will Partner To Boost Energy Efficiency, Governor Announces (Marijuana Moment)

// Marijuana Regulatory Agency releases marijuana event rules (Huron Daily Tribune)

// Oklahoma Cannabis Market Outpaces That of Most States (New Cannabis Ventures)


These headlines are brought to you by Curaleaf, one of the leading vertically-integrated cannabis operators in the U.S. With legal medical marijuana dispensaries, cultivation sites, and processing facilities all over the United States, Curaleaf has served more than 165,000 medical cannabis patients and looks forward to helping many more long into the future. Swing over to Curaleaf.com to learn more about this very cool company!


// Marijuana law firm that helped Parnas and Fruman’s political rise cuts its ties (McClatchy DC)

// Eaze Insights- 2019 State of Cannabis report is here (Eaze)

// Berkeley Will Be the Next City in California to Allow Pot Consumption Lounges (Merry Jane)

// Santa Cruz Just Decriminalized All Natural Psychedelics (Merry Jane)

// Marijuana Tourism Will Boost Tax Revenue Illinois Governor Says In State Of The State Speech (Marijuana Moment)

// High Times Ditches Dreams of NASDAQ Listing (New Cannabis Ventures)

// MJBizDaily acquires The Emerald Conference to boost science reach (Marijuana Business Daily)


Check out our other projects:
Marijuana Today— Our flagship title, a weekly podcast examining the world of marijuana business and activism with some of the smartest people in the industry and movement.
Marijuana Media Connect— A service that connects industry insiders in the legal marijuana industry with journalists, bloggers, and writers in need of expert sources for their stories.

Love these headlines? Love our podcast? Support our work with a financial contribution and become a patron.

Photo: Daniel Spiess/Flickr

Youth Marijuana Use Doesn’t Rise When it’s Legal. Federal Data Prove It.

Despite prohibitionists’ often-expressed fears that legalization would lead more young people to use marijuana, new federal data released on Aug. 20, 2019, show no such trend.

Reports of past-month cannabis use among those 12-17 remained stable from 2017 to 2018 — and they’re significantly lower than in the years prior to when the first states began legalizing for adult use.

That’s according to the 2018 National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH), an annual report produced by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA).

“The percentage of adolescents in 2018 who used marijuana in the past year was lower than the percentages in 2002 to 2004 and in 2009 to 2013, but it was similar to the percentages in 2005 to 2008 and in 2014 to 2017,” the SAMHSA said.

Source: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)

Recent studies that have used NSDUH data and other sources also demonstrate that youth marijuana use is not increasing post-legalization. In fact, research published in the Journal of the American Medical Association’s JAMA Pediatrics in July 2019 found that states with recreational cannabis experience a decline in underage marijuana use, with the study authors stating that regulated markets appear to deter illicit use.

Indeed, on a national scale, the percentage of adolescents who reported using marijuana began declining at a greater rate in the years after states started implementing legal cannabis systems. In 2018, 12.5% of youths 12-17 said they used cannabis in the last month, compared with 13.5% in 2012, according to the NSDUH results.

Colorado and Washington became the first U.S. states to vote to legalize marijuana for recreational use in late 2012, with legal sales commencing in 2014.

Between 2002 and 2018, the highest rate of adolescent marijuana use took place in 2002, when 15.8% reported past-month consumption.

“The survey results suggest that marijuana use among youth has remained stable and low in recent years, even as more states legalize medical and adult use,” Sheila Vakharia, Ph.D., Deputy Director of the Drug Policy Alliance’s Department of Research and Academic Engagement, told Marijuana Moment. “Rather than encouraging increased use, it is possible that legalization has limited access and deterred youth use. We find that these results strengthen the case for legalization in the interest of public health and protecting our nation’s young people.”

What’s more, the report found that cases of cannabis use disorder declined again for the 12-17 group in 2018, marking the seventh year in a row that fewer young people seem to be misusing the plant.

Source: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA).

Interestingly, these trends are developing even as people’s perceptions of the risks of casual marijuana consumption are dropping. That seems to contradict an argument from reform opponents who claimed that legalizing cannabis would normalize it in such a way that underage individuals would feel more emboldened to experiment with marijuana.

Source:Via Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA).

Overall, marijuana consumption increased across age groups by about 1 percentage point over the past year, the survey found, with the bulk of that rise being attributable to those older than 26. Past-month cannabis use for that demographic increased from 12.2% in 2017 to 13.3% in 2018.


Featured Image: Marijuana use is rising, according to federal data, but not among adolescents. The 2018 National Survey on Drug Use and Health found that the rate of past-month cannabis consumption by respondents ages 12-17 remained stable from 2017 to 2018, and lower than the years before states began legalizing marijuana. (Photo by Gina Coleman/Weedmaps News)

This article has been republished from Marijuana Moment under a content syndication agreement. Read the original article here. 

The post Youth Marijuana Use Doesn’t Rise When it’s Legal. Federal Data Prove It. appeared first on Weedmaps News.

Infusing Marijuana With Data: Cannabis Industry Vets Aim to Clear the Haze in a Booming Industry

Cy Scott, Brian Wansolich, and Scott Vickers had just sold their popular cannabis directory Leafly to Privateer Holdings. As they plotted their next endeavor, one word kept coming up in almost every conversation: data. The legal pot trade was starving for it. Brands were coming on the scene in droves. Investors were pouring in millions of dollars. And there were any number of ways to deliver pot to consumers — plant strains, oils, tinctures, vape…

Monday, July 29, 2019 Headlines | Marijuana Today Daily News

Marijuana Today Daily Headlines
Monday, July 29, 2019 | Curated by host Shea Gunther

// Data Analytics Company Nielsen Projects American Cannabis Market to Reach $40 Billion by 2025 (New Cannabis Ventures)

// Police Traffic Searches Dropped 70 Percent In Vermont City After Marijuana Legalization (Marijuana Moment)

// Congressional Bill Would Let Some Students With Marijuana Convictions Keep Financial Aid (Marijuana Moment)


Today’s headlines are brought to you by our friends over at Eaze.com, California’s top one stop website for legal marijuana delivery. If you live in the golden state, swing over to Eaze.com to see if they are active in your area. With deliveries taking place in less than an hour, it’s never been easier to get legal California marijuana delivery. And of course, if you don’t live where Eaze delivers, you can still benefit from all the useful bits of industry insight and analysis they’ve developed using their properly aggregate and anonymized sales data stream.


// CannTrust shares spike after CEO chair forced out amid unlicensed grow probe (Red Deer Advocate (Canadian Press))

// Cannabis to be ‘fully legal in UK within years’ (Independent)

// Oregon Marijuana Tax Revenue Crosses $100 Million Mark (Bloomberg Tax)

// Is cannabis use the same as off-duty drinking by workers? Many companies still say no (CNBC)

// Grading the Democratic Presidential Candidates on Marijuana: Pete Buttigieg (Canna Law Blog)

// California marijuana track-and-trace data to remain confidential (Marijuana Business Daily)

// A Second Bipartisan Marijuana Insurance Bill Was Filed In Congress This Week (Marijuana Moment)


Check out our other projects:
Marijuana Today— Our flagship title, a weekly podcast examining the world of marijuana business and activism with some of the smartest people in the industry and movement.
Marijuana Media Connect— A service that connects industry insiders in the legal marijuana industry with journalists, bloggers, and writers in need of expert sources for their stories.

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Photo: Brian Shamblen/Flickr

Friday, February 1, 2019 Headlines | Marijuana Today Daily News

Marijuana Today Daily Headlines
Friday, February 1, 2019 | Curated by host Shea Gunther

// World Health Organization Recommends Rescheduling Marijuana Under International Treaties (Forbes)

// Baltimore Prosecutor Files Rare Petition to Erase Cannabis Convictions (Leafly (AP))

// Attorney General backs legal cannabis market in Vermont (VT Digger)


Today’s headlines are brought to you by our friends over at Mason Jar Event Group, which believes in bringing people together and creating community through shared experiences and joyous occasions! Check out all their upcoming events at MasonJarEventGroup.com and get in touch about having them produce your own special cannabis corporate event.


// Oregon Is Producing Twice As Much Cannabis As People Are Using (Oregon Public Radio)

// Oregon’s Cannabis Lab Testing System Flunks State Audit (Leafly)

// History Of Alcohol Prohibition Suggests Advantage For States That Legalize Marijuana Early (Marijuana Moment)

// Feds local police launch raids on up to 50 black-market marijuana grow houses in Denver area (Denver Post)

// Organigram Surpasses One Million Pre-Rolls Production (New Cannabis Ventures)

// A cannabis producer just topped Apple as the favorite stock among millennials (Business Insider)

// Lack of cannabis tracking data in WA sparks confusion, missed business opportunities (Marijuana Business Daily)


Check out our other projects:
Marijuana Today— Our flagship title, a weekly podcast examining the world of marijuana business and activism with some of the smartest people in the industry and movement.
Marijuana Media Connect— A service that connects industry insiders in the legal marijuana industry with journalists, bloggers, and writers in need of expert sources for their stories.

Love these headlines? Love our podcast? Support our work with a financial contribution and become a patron.

Photo: Vaping Three Sixty/Flickr