Maryland Court: Cops Can Stop, Question Someone Who Smells of Pot

Officers in Maryland may stop and question an individual who smells of cannabis, a court ruled last week.

In a divided ruling, the state’s Court of Appeals said “the drug’s aroma provides police with ‘reasonable suspicion’ that the person may have 10 grams or more, thus permitting the officers to conduct a brief ‘investigatory’ stop,” the Daily Record reported.

But the ruling does not give law enforcement carte blanche in those circumstances. According to the outlet, those officers “must end the stop if they do not quickly obtain information that gives them probable cause to believe the person has at least 10 grams or has committed another criminal offense.”

And the Daily Record noted that, despite the ruling, “possession of less than 10 grams of the drug is not a crime in the state.”

The ruling stems from a case involving a 15-year-old who was found to have a handgun in his possession. Officers found the weapon on the juvenile’s waist after conducting a frisk that was prompted by the odor of cannabis.

Last year, the Maryland Court of Special Appeals––an intermediate appellate court––took up the case and ruled that the smell of weed does not justify a cop to conduct a search, citing the decriminalization of possessing 10 grams or less of cannabis in Maryland.

“Because possession of less than 10 grams of marijuana is no longer a crime, the suspicion required to support a stop for the crime of possession of marijuana, therefore, is that the person is in possession of more than 10 grams of marijuana,” Judge Kathryn Grill Graeff wrote in her opinion, as quoted by local news outlet WTOP. “And because the ‘odor of marijuana alone does not indicate the quantity, if any, of marijuana in someone’s possession,’ [citing a previous case], it cannot, by itself, provide reasonable suspicion that the person is in possession of a criminal amount of marijuana or otherwise involved in criminal activity.”

But last week’s ruling from the state’s Court of Appeals undoes that opinion.

In a 4-3 decision, the majority “public interest in investigating and prosecuting criminal offenses, balanced against an individual’s freedom of movement and reasonable expectation of privacy in their person, leads us to conclude that the odor of marijuana by itself justifies a brief investigatory detention,” according to the Daily Record.

“Given the important governmental interest in detecting, preventing, and prosecuting crime, the Fourth Amendment allows a brief seizure, based on reasonable suspicion, to attempt to determine if criminal activity is afoot,” Judge Jonathan Biran wrote in the majority opinion, as quoted by the Daily Record. “An officer who lacks probable cause to arrest is not required ‘to simply shrug his shoulders and allow a crime to occur or a criminal to escape.’”

Judge Michele D. Hotten, writing for the minority, said that the “smell of odor on a person, alone, makes it impossible for law enforcement to determine whether the person has engaged in a wholly innocent activity, a civil offense, or a crime.”

“While reasonable suspicion is a relatively low barrier, law enforcement may not rely on a hunch that a person may possess 10 grams of (marijuana) odor in a non-medicinal capacity to form a basis of reasonable suspicion,” Hotten wrote in the dissenting opinion, according to the Daily Record.

Another judge in the majority addressed the particulars of the stop involving the 15-year-old, saying that the “officer in this case was justified in stopping [the juvenile] because police were responding to a call that a males [sic] were smoking a controlled dangerous substance in the basement of an apartment complex, which would indicate an amount of marijuana of at least 10 grams,” according to the Daily Record.

The post Maryland Court: Cops Can Stop, Question Someone Who Smells of Pot appeared first on High Times.

California Bill Would Require Warning Labels on Cannabis

California licensed cannabis companies would be required to put additional warnings on regulated marijuana products under a bill currently making its way through the state legislature. SB 1097, the Cannabis Right to Know Act, was passed by the California state Senate by a vote of 23-3 on May 25. On June 22, the measure was approved unanimously by the Assembly Business and Professions Committee before being referred to the Assembly Appropriations Committee.

SB 1097 would require large warning messages similar to those found on cigarettes and other tobacco products to be included on packaging for all licensed cannabis products. The labels would include messages about the potential risks cannabis poses including impaired driving, effects on adolescent brain development, impacts on pregnancy and associations with mental health issues including schizophrenia. The bill also requires retailers to provide a brochure outlining the health risks of cannabis to new customers and to display the brochures for other customers at the point of service.

Some of the warning messages for marijuana products mandated by the Cannabis Right to Know Act include:

  • “WARNING: Do not buy illegally sold cannabis as it is more likely to contain unsafe additives or harmful contaminants such as mold or pesticides.”
  • “WARNING: Do not use if pregnant or breastfeeding. Exposure to cannabis during pregnancy may harm your baby’s health, including causing low birth weight.”
  • “WARNING: Cannabis use may contribute to mental health problems, including psychotic disorders such as schizophrenia. Risk is greatest for frequent users and when using products with high THC levels.”
  • “WARNING: Cannabis use may contribute to mental health problems, including increased thoughts of suicide and suicide attempts. Risk is greatest for frequent users.”

The rotating set of ten warning labels would be required to be printed in a black 12-point font against a bright yellow background and cover one-third of the package front. The labels are modeled after comprehensive regulations adopted in Canada, where cannabis was legalized in 2018.

Bill’s Supporters Warn of Health Risks

Supporters of SB 1097 including Dr. Deepak Cyril D’Souza, a psychiatry professor at Yale University School of Medicine and a member of the physicians advisory board for Connecticut’s medical marijuana program, say that cannabis can cause serious health problems for some people. He believes that warning labels could help reduce the harmful effects of cannabis like similar messages included on packaging for cigarettes. D’Souza attributes warning labels, education campaigns and marketing restrictions for a steep reduction in smoking by children and teenagers observed over the past decade.

The health risks posed by cannabis can be exacerbated by products with high levels of THC, according to proponents of the Cannabis Right to Know Act. The THC content of cannabis flower from some varietals can exceed 35%, while marijuana concentrates can boast THC levels of more than 99%.

“Today’s turbocharged products are turbocharging the harms associated with cannabis,” said Dr. Lynn Silver with the Public Health Institute, a nonprofit organization supporting SB 1097.

Industry Group Opposes Cannabis Right to Know Act

In a call to action posted online last month, the trade group California Cannabis Industry Association expressed opposition to SB 1097. Seeking the support of members and their customers, the CCIA wrote that the “bill would add duplicative labeling requirements to cannabis products that will do very little to protect public health or undercut the illicit market, but will instead unfairly penalize legal operators who already comply with stringent labeling and childproof packaging requirements.”

Noting that the bill would result in higher prices for regulated cannabis products, the industry group called on California-licensed cannabis companies and consumers to contact their state lawmakers and ask that they oppose the Cannabis Right to Know Act.

“This bill is really duplicative and puts unnecessary burdens on the legal cannabis industry, as we already have incredibly restrictive packaging and advertising requirements,” Lindsay Robinson, executive director of the CCIA, told NPR.

Robinson added that the state should focus its resources on combating the illicit cannabis industry instead of licensed companies, which are already struggling to comply with strict regulations. Noting that licensed cannabis dispensaries in California generated $1.3 billion in state tax revenue last year, she said that adding additional requirements increases their costs and makes it more difficult for them to compete with the illicit marijuana market.

“The only real option if they fail out of the legal system is to shutter their businesses altogether or to operate underground. And I don’t think the state of California, with the tax revenue, wants either of those to happen,” Robinson said. “The heart of the issue is that there’s a massive, unregulated market in the state.”

Snowden Steiber, a regulatory analyst at regulatory compliance software platform Simplifya, told Cannabis Now that SB 1097 would saddle California’s industry with redundant rules.

“The current regulations already require licensees to include clear and legible warnings on the following issues for each product: cannabis’s status as a Schedule I controlled substance, keep out of reach of children and animals, no one under 21 may consume, no pregnant people should consume cannabis, effects may be delayed for two hours and warnings on cannabis’s ability to impair driving and cause DUIs,” Steiber wrote in an email. “This is a fairly comprehensive list that covers many of the warnings that are pushed forward in the new rules.”

The Cannabis Right to Know Act is also opposed by activists including the California chapter of the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws. If passed by the legislature and signed into law by Gov. Gavin Newsome, SB 1097 would go into effect on January 1, 2025.

The post California Bill Would Require Warning Labels on Cannabis appeared first on Cannabis Now.

Does Vaping Cause Cancer Like Cigarettes?

There’s a lot of contradictory information spewed at us on a regular basis, and its hard to know the truth of things, especially when big corporations have reasons to want you to buy their products, and when governments take money from these entities. When it comes to vaping, tons of smear campaigns are out there, but are they saying anything useful? Unless vaping is tantamount to smoking, isn’t it automatically a better option? Let’s get into it, does vaping cause cancer or heart disease like smoking?

Does vaping cause cancer like cigarettes? While the obvious answer is no, there seems to be plenty of confusion on this matter. This publication covers news stories in the emerging cannabis and psychedelics spaces. Follow along by signing up for the THC Weekly Newsletter, which also nets you access to tons of deals on products like vapes, edibles, and other devices, as well as cannabinoids, like HHC-O, Delta 8Delta 9 THCDelta-10 THCTHCOTHCVTHCP HHC. We do remind, no one should ever buy or use a product they are uncomfortable with.


The detriments of smoking

First off, let’s take a look at standard smoking, and the issues that go with it. The first thing to understand on this topic, is that it’s not actually about cigarettes. Or more specifically, it’s not actually about tobacco. Tobacco can be used medicinally when not smoked, and has been for millennia. No one was dying from it before the use of cigarettes. The term ‘smoke inhalation’ refers to breathing in too much smoke, and the detrimental effects this can have. This refers to anything lit on fire and breathed in, whether its trees, plants, plastics, or tobacco.

Cigarette smoking is simply constant smoke inhalation. It makes the idea of buying organic tobacco, or switching to herbal smokable concoctions, a bit of a joke in the end. Sure, it might get a person away from some of the chemicals of standard processed tobacco, but it won’t get anyone away from the dangers that come from lighting something on fire, and breathing it in. Smoking cigarettes, as constant smoke inhalation, comes with a myriad of health problems, particularly for long-time users.

The bottom-line numbers tell a compelling story when looking at the generals of smoking damage. Every year, approximately 480,000 people die from smoking-related causes. A massive 41,000 of these are from secondhand smoke. As in, 41,000 people a year die from someone else’s smoking habit. In comparison, the US is up-in-arms over the growing drug overdose issue and the rising number of opioid deaths. These deaths account for just over 100,000 a year according to new CDC numbers, which make even opioids pale in comparison to the dangers of smoking.

What about a comparison to vaping? Though vaping hasn’t been around as long as smoking, starting mainly in the early 2000’s, it simply isn’t linked to a large death toll. As of 2020, the CDC could only come up with 68 related deaths, and all deaths were attributable to additives in vape liquid, and not to whatever compound was meant to be vaped, or the vaping itself. It bears mentioning here, that a dry herb vape is not included in this, and that this issue is specifically related to the use of vape cartridges.

Cancer and heart disease from smoking

Smoking is related to a huge number of problems, but the main two which lead to premature death, are cardiovascular issues, and cancer. Just how much damage do cigarettes do in these arenas? The CDC put out information detailing yearly death numbers from examining the years 2005-2009. As smoking has been around well over a hundred years, and reached higher levels of popularity in previous decades to this one, these dates are perfectly fine for understanding the situation today.

In terms of smoking related cancer deaths, approximately 163,700 people die of cancer yearly from smoking. When looking at cardiovascular disease, which includes heart disease, diabetes, and vascular disease, there are 160,000 deaths a year from smoking. There is however, another major class of deaths from smoking, and its related to respiratory diseases like pneumonia, influenza, and COPD. From this grouping there are about 113,100 deaths per year.

Now, let’s make this worse. Remember how 41,000 people die a year just from sitting in the same room as smokers? Well, about 7,333 of these deaths are from lung cancer, and 33,951 are from heart disease. There are that many cancer and heart-related issues, even when the afflicted person isn’t the one with the bad habit.

Does vaping cause cancer?

There is a lot of weird, seemingly nonsensical, information out there trying to tell you vaping is bad. However, when it comes to the actual questions of how to measure this, the answer just leaves more questions. Like why are we being told vaping is dangerous when no statistics back this up? I mean, if it was true, it would be attached to some pretty bad death numbers, right? Well, not exactly…

To be fair, vaping hasn’t been around for as long as smoking. The main surge of e-cigarettes and cannabis vape carts started in the 2010’s. However, as someone with asthma, I can personally attest to the fact that smoking causes damage in me pretty fast, whereas vaping does not. And I know this from how my lungs feel, and how I breathe. Perhaps it is possible to tell if vaping can cause something like cancer or heart disease early on, or at the very least, if it starts to cause the damage that leads in these directions.

cancer

According to the site Cancer Research UK, the answer to the question, does vaping cause cancer, is no. While the organization certainly doesn’t rule out that there could be negative side effects, it specifically states that vaping related deaths so far are only attributable to additives, and are not related to the act of vaping in general. The organization says this:

“You may have heard about vaping causing an outbreak of lung illness in 2019 in the United States. An investigation found the cases were linked to contaminated illegal products. It was not linked to vaping regularly or in the long term. There was no similar outbreak in the UK, and the chemicals of concern are banned in e-cigarettes here. There is no good evidence that e-cigarettes bought from legal places cause lung disease.”

What about secondhand vaping damage, does that exist? According to the same organization, “There is no good evidence that second-hand vapour from e-cigarettes is harmful. As vapes are still relatively new, we can’t be sure there aren’t any long-term effects to people who breathe in someone else’s vapour. But this is unlikely to be harmful.”

The site does, however, go on to repeat the oft mentioned incorrect assertion that, “Passive vaping is not the same as passive smoking. This is because e-cigarettes do not contain tobacco.” E-cigarettes, of course, often do have tobacco, and tobacco was never seen as deadly until it was used in cigarettes. The line that tobacco itself is bad has been repeated so much, that the idea of what smoke inhalation is, is often bypassed, even by the organizations that should really know the difference. Even with this misunderstanding, the site does make clear that there is no link between vaping and cancer.

Does vaping cause cardiovascular disease?

So, does vaping cause cancer? Well, even a cancer organization doesn’t think so, but what about cardiovascular disease? When searching for vaping and cardiovascular issues, a lot of negative sounding articles come up. But what doesn’t, is literally any statistic that backs up an issue. Again, as vaping is a relatively new phenomenon, this doesn’t mean that vaping isn’t associated with cardiovascular issues in the long term. However, there isn’t one statistic right now that says it does. In this review, the most that can be said, is that:

“There are no long-term outcome studies on the cardiovascular risk of vaping electronic cigarettes, but the effects of electronic cigarettes on known risk factors for cardiovascular disease, including neurohumoural activation, oxidative stress and inflammation, endothelial function and thrombosis, have been studied.” It didn’t, however, offer anything more conclusive than saying that risk factors have been studied.

vaping

What’s incredibly troubling, is that the 2019 study that initially made the claim that vaping e-cigarettes leads to a higher risk of heart attacks, was retracted eight months later! Sounds like it was a smear campaign that couldn’t take the heat in the end, and sadly, that article is still referenced all over the internet. No one ever said vaping would be 100% risk-free, but if it requires putting out research so bad it must be retracted to make the point, it says a lot for the lack of real information available to confirm this point. There is currently no statistic that exists about vaping and increased risk of cardiovascular disease.

To take it one step further, this longitudinal analysis E-Cigarette Use and Risk of Cardiovascular Disease: A Longitudinal Analysis of the PATH Study (2013–2019), reported that “Two large cross-sectional studies reported no significant association between exclusive e-cigarette use and cardiovascular disease (CVD).”

Conclusion

Does vaping cause cancer or cardiovascular disease? Well, the jury is technically out until more time goes by and research for long-term use can be collected. What has been made pretty clear on nearly every level, is that vaping is considerably healthier than smoking cigarettes when it comes to both cancer and cardiovascular issues, both of which are increased by smoke inhalation, which vaping is not.

So why is there so much out there screaming about the dangers of vaping? And doing so while hiding or ignoring the incredible death rate of smoking? Perhaps it has more to do with what groups are funneling money into government representative pockets, and less to do with the facts.

Thanks for joining us! We appreciate you stopping by CBDtesters.co / Cannadelics.com, a top internet offering for independent news covering the growing cannabis and psychedelics industries. Read-thru the site frequently to stay informed on everything going on, and subscribe to The THC Weekly Newsletter, so you never miss an important story or awesome product deal.

The post Does Vaping Cause Cancer Like Cigarettes? appeared first on CBD Testers.

South Africa Still Working On New Cannabis Bill

Back in 2020, I reported on South Africa’s legal limbo after a Constitutional Court ruling made cannabis prohibition illegal. What exactly this means for the country has been undefined for the past few years, and South Africa is still working to finalize its Cannabis for Private Purposes bill.

South Africa should have a new cannabis bill soon, which is great, because we’ve been waiting for it since 2018! We’re a publication that focuses on independent coverage of the cannabis and psychedelics fields. You can join in by signing up for the THC Weekly Newsletter, and also get prime access to tons of deals on vapes, edibles and smoking devices. We’ve also got standout offers on cannabinoids, like HHC-O, Delta 8Delta 9 THCDelta-10 THCTHCOTHCVTHCP HHC, which won’t kill your bank account. Head over to our “Best-of” lists to get these deals, and remember to enjoy responsibly!


How it started

Much like many other countries, South Africa instituted laws against cannabis in the early 1920’s. First in 1922 with the Customs and Excise Duty Act, which classified cannabis as a habit-forming drug, and then in 1925 by including cannabis in the country’s Dangerous Drugs list, putting it with the likes of cocaine and opium. Further to that, it was criminalized 100% in 1928 with the Medical, Dental, and Pharmacy Act, which is where it stayed all the way until 2018.

On March 31st, 2017, a judge ruled that it was not constitutional to bar cultivation and use of cannabis for private use. This was done with a justification that this is a non-justifiable personal privacy infringement. A previous case on the matter brought by Gareth Prince about 15 years earlier, focused on the idea of infringement of religious freedoms, but this case was unsuccessful at changing anything.

The 2017 case didn’t include religious aspects, but focused on the privacy rights – or inalienable rights – of the people. The right to privacy is guaranteed under section 14 of the Bill of Rights of South Africa. It states that every individual has the right to lead a private life without government interference. The judge in the ruling made this statement:

“A very high level of protection is given to the individual’s intimate personal sphere of life and the maintenance of its basic preconditions and there is a final untouchable sphere of human freedom that is beyond interference from any public authority. So much so that, in regard to this most intimate core of privacy, no justifiable limitation thereof can take place… This inviolable core is left behind once an individual enters into relationships with persons outside this closest intimate sphere; the individual’s activities then acquire a social dimension and the right of privacy in this context becomes subject to limitation.”

However, as this was a regular court, in order for this ruling to have full effect, it needed to be confirmed by the Constitutional Court. When expected appeals to the decision came in, this was done. In September 2018, the Constitutional Court made a ruling on the matter which confirmed the ruling of the lower court, setting it as law. Some of the included points of the ruling, were the following:

  • Cannabis use is permitted by an adult when done in private.
  • Cannabis use is not permitted around children, or anyone who does not consent.
  • Cannabis is not permitted in public, or for anything beyond personal use.
  • Cannabis is permitted for private cultivation so long as its for personal use.

If all this sounds familiar, it’s because it’s a similar scenario to what’s going on in Mexico, where a court ruling created legalization case law, but which still requires a government bill for all particulars. In both cases, it was the use of personal sovereignty laws which led the way to make these changes. In South Africa, the Court ruling set a legal precedent, but it didn’t make clear the specifics of what is allowed. Since that time, draft legislation has come up, but nothing has been passed.

Cannabis for Private Purposes bill

After what has been a very long wait, the government of South Africa is getting closer to releasing formal legislation, in the form of the Cannabis for Private Purposes bill. This bill has been circulating since 2020, and has been updated throughout that time based on the comments of different people and organizations. Current additions were approved by the National Assembly on March 31st of this year, meaning the bill is now in a second round of public meetings.

Some additional points within the South Africa cannabis bill include:

  • Recreational cannabis commercial activities.
  • Rules for cultivation, possession and supply of cannabis for members of organizations specifically related to religious and cultural purposes.
  • Individual privacy rights for adults to use cannabis for medical purposes.
South African cannabis

It also defines what a ‘private space’ is. The definition includes: a building, house, room, shed, hut, tent, mobile home, caravan, boat, or any part of one of the above. Essentially, anything that can be closed (or is away from other things), and where the public doesn’t have direct access, is a private space.

Since its still open for public comment, nothing is a done deal yet. The latest to give comments is the country’s largest trade federation, the Congress of South African Trade Unions (Cosatu), which supports the legalization of the plant on all fronts. It submit its comments at the end of May. Though the organization supports legalization measures, it said the current bill is ‘unrealistically bureaucratic and cumbersome’, and needs a lot of reworking.

In fact, it went as far as to say that the legislation is way too restrictive, and doesn’t decriminalize the plant as much as it should. This is highlighted by how the organization sees the issue of cannabis regulation for religious purposes, and its dislike of rules created to monitor how people use cannabis in general.

Regardless of edits, none of this means that South Africa will have a regulated market. That’s one of the big differences between how South Africa and Mexico are handling things. Mexico is expected to have a regulated recreational market, whereas South Africa is legalizing private use and cultivation of the plant only.

How personal sovereignty leads to cannabis rights

The legal change in South Africa was a result of a court case that relied on personal sovereignty laws, which are a part of inalienable rights. Inalienable rights are rights that every human has, and that a government can’t take away. They relate to natural rights, or what some would call God-given rights, and they are not to be altered by governmental laws. Personal sovereignty is the same as self-ownership. This is considered an individual’s right for bodily integrity, and to be the sole controller of themselves. Personal sovereignty, is an inalienable right.

Three countries now have updated cannabis laws due to court cases involving personal sovereignty rights. South Africa’s Constitutional Court case was in 2018, making the 2017 verdict an official one in terms of the country’s laws. Though it doesn’t seek to set up a regulated market, it will allow for the possession, use, and cultivation of the plant privately.

inalienable rights

2018 was a popular year for inalienable rights to kick in. Over in Georgia, another Constitutional Court case ended with a verdict that overturned prohibition. The Court ruled that it’s not constitutional to punish the use of cannabis, as it poses no threat to others. It said a punishment for cannabis use is restrictive of personal freedoms, so long as no 3td party is affected. However, Georgia never mentioned needing a bill to further clarify anything, and the country now resides in a weird gray area, where cultivation and buying/selling are illegal, but possession and use are totally cool.

The other example is Mexico, which became the 4th legalized country officially in 2021, when the Supreme Court dropped laws of prohibition for private use, upon the government simply not doing its job. It unofficially became the 4th country back in 2018, when the Supreme Court ruled on the last of five consecutive cases in favor of legal cannabis use and cultivation. It said, as personally developed human beings, we must be allowed to pick our own recreational activities without the government interfering. When the government did not turn in a corresponding bill on time, the Supreme Court went ahead and dropped prohibition laws a year ago. We’re still waiting on the full bill to begin the official sales market.

Conclusion

Truth is, none of the three countries to make legal updates based on constitutional courts, have totally gotten it together yet. Georgia is in a strange legal limbo, and Mexico and South Africa are both waiting on specific bills to pass. We certainly have to wait a bit longer on all fronts, but it looks like South Africa is getting that much closer to a formal legalization/decriminalization with updates to its cannabis draft bill. The question now is, which will be first, South Africa or Mexico?

Hello readers! We appreciate you stopping by CBDtesters.co / Cannadelics.com, a premiere web offering for fully-rounded news coverage of the growing cannabis and psychedelics fields. Join us frequently for a daily dose of news updates, and subscribe to The THC Weekly Newsletter, so you’re never late on getting a story. We like to remind: there are tons of cannabis products on the market, and we don’t promote anyone buy a product they are uncomfortable with using.

The post South Africa Still Working On New Cannabis Bill appeared first on CBD Testers.

The Laser Bong You Never Knew You Needed

The technology of smoking has improved greatly over the last couple of decades. First it was vaping, and the ability to no longer burn the weed. Now it’s the new laser bong, and a technology that takes the butane out of smoking.

The laser bong is the newest in weed-smoking technology, and it’s a pretty cool looking piece of equipment. If you’re a person who needs the next thing now, you definitely need this bong! We report on tons of stories in the cannabis and psychedelic industries, which you can play along with by subscribing to the THC Weekly Newsletter. This also gets you prime access to promotions on all kinds of items like vapes, edibles, and paraphernalia, along with premium deals on cannabinoid compounds like HHC-O, Delta 8, Delta 9 THC, Delta-10 THC, THCO, THCV, THCP, and HHC. As always, we do remind customers not to purchase any product they are uncomfortable with using.


What’s a regular bong?

A bong, or waterpipe, is a smoking device that uses water to filter the smoke. These devices come in different sizes, and shapes, and though they sometimes look very different, the functional design in the same.

A bong is made of a water chamber, which is connected to a mouthpiece in one place, and a bowl in another, and sometimes a carb hole as well, although this is not necessary if the bowl is removable and able to work as a carb. The point of this function is to let in air to clear the accumulated smoke in the water chamber. The chamber needs to be air and watertight when the user puts their mouth to the mouthpiece. The weed is put in the bowl and lit on fire.

When the weed is lit, the user inhales through the mouthpiece, pulling in air through the bowl, through the water chamber, and into the user’s mouth. If there’s a carb hole, this must be covered during inhale, or it won’t work. Once the user has pulled as much air as they wish, they can let go of the carb, or remove the bowl, in order to clear out the chamber of built-up smoke.

Bongs are used for smoking, but the same structure is also used to vaporize, via dabbing. Dabs are used as a way to vaporize concentrates, and use the same method of heating the concentrate, and then sucking the vapor through the water. The water works as a filter, trapping the heavier particles in the smoke/vapor, which makes for a smoother hit. The water also cools the smoke down, making it less harsh on the throat. Some bong use another piece called a percolator, which is a twisty glass structure, also meant to cool the air down further. It’s common as well to put ice cubes in the neck of a bong, or directly in the water chamber, for cooling purposes.

Because of the water filtration, bongs might be slightly less dangerous than waterless pipes or joints, but there are things to consider. The weed is still being lit on fire and breathed in, which like it or not, is smoke inhalation, the basis for smoking issues. Plus, the weed is lit with a lighter, which also means the user is breathing in butane fumes as well. This matters in that sometimes a flame is held for many seconds when smoking a bong, in order to burn the herbs adequately.

What is a laser bong?

Let’s be honest, just the term ‘laser bong’ sounds all futuristic and cool, and the best part is… it’s real. Smoking technology has certainly reached a pinnacle at this point in history, as its now possible to light your weed with lasers. How effective is this new method? And what’s the difference in terms of what you inhale?

The company Hitoki is the first to make this bong a reality, called the Hitoki Trident. The Trident is a cylindrical bong of mostly black airplane grade aluminum, with an air hose about 1/4-1/3 of the way up from the bottom. Above the air hose is a laser chamber that shines blue when in use, and below it is the water chamber that the smoke gets pulled through. The laser it emits is a 445 nm class 4 blue laser, hence the blue of the chamber. The water hose is either an actual hose – like what’s used for a hookah, but a bit thicker, or a more stable plastic hose-like mouthpiece, more akin to a standard bong.

The benefit of the laser is that it can heat to a very precise temperature, and doesn’t have to go as high as a lighter. It’s used to burn either dry herb or concentrates, and is very efficient, allowing for approximately 280 uses off of each charge of its battery. Something that can be done easily with its included USB charger. In all other ways beside the laser as a heat source, the Trident functions like any other bong.

In order to use it, the bong comes apart for loading the weed. It has two distinct pieces that lock back together with an FDA compliant interlock system. It’s about as simple as loading it, locking it, and lighting it, which is done with the push of a button. The laser has three power settings, with the lowest temperature for buds, the mid for dense buds, and the highest for concentrates. It also comes equipped with a carb button for cleaning out the smoke chamber.

laser bong

If you’re thinking this is a lot for a bong, you’re right! These bongs are so high scale, they even come in gold or rose gold, for those who want the extra fancy version. Even the regular version will set you back a bit, starting $499,99. Hitoki marks the first company to employ this laser technology for bongs, but it likely opened a can of worms that tons of companies will get in on. Hitoki boasts the cleanest smoking experience using the Trident, and that the smoke is the most flavorful possible.

Benefits of a laser bong

It’s not exactly a cheap piece of equipment, and therefore won’t be available to everyone. It can be expected that upcoming competitor models will retain the same high price, although if its out long enough, there’s surely a budget model somewhere in the future. For now, however, if you want this new smoking gadget, you’ll have to pay out. So, if the cost is so high, what are the benefits of using a laser bong?

For one thing, there’s no lighter, and no other material being burned in order to light the herb. Back a few years ago I had a boyfriend who bought a hemp wick (think hemp twine), which was also meant to clean out the lighting aspect. Instead of lighting the bong with a lighter, the lighter lit the wick, which was then used to light the weed. Honestly, it worked okay, but I found it difficult to use. The laser bong does remove the inhalation of any extra materials, although there isn’t much information on whether it itself creates byproducts which might not be desirable to inhale.

The laser is supposedly more efficient than using a lighter, burning the herb evenly, and requiring less weed to do the same job. Going through weed quickly is often an issue, particularly when a device does not heat evenly, or simply requires a large amount for a not comparable hit. Anything that can elongate the amount of time weed lasts, certainly provides a positive benefit. How much it does in this department, has not been made clear.

It’s super cool. I don’t know how much this counts as a benefit, but in our world of constantly one-upping each other, and showing off our newest expenditures to those who want what we have, this bong certainly fits in line. Sure, it’s the mansion that’s probably too big, or the eighth car we could do without, but who doesn’t want a huge mansion, or to be able to afford eight cars? If the use of a laser does indeed make it a safer experience, then that is a massive benefit. Either way, in terms of ‘cool’ and ‘status’, this smoking device is the Rolls Royce of bongs.

It’s advertised that this laser bong uses lower temperatures to heat, and that this affects the overall feel. While this would have no effect on the negatives of combustion, it might make a difference in how a user feels the smoke in their body. Lower temperatures can mean a more comfortable time, and less coughing, as the heat can bother the throat and lungs. This is why bongs are often kitted out with extra measures to cool down the smoke.

laser

There is one massive thing to remember. If you’re looking at a laser bong as a healthier smoking option, this isn’t quite true. The biggest issue with smoking – and it doesn’t matter what’s smoked – is that something is being lit on fire and inhaled, and this is not changed through this particular design. It eliminates the added on butane fumes, that’s for sure, and therefore might net a smoke that tastes better and is slightly cleaner, but it won’t take out the overall dangers of smoking, not even by a little.

Quite honestly, in terms of actual benefits, there are some, but they’re not extensive. It does seem to promote a sleek, upscale, cleaner smoking experience, and the removal of butane is certainly helpful, along with the ability to make weed go further. Luckily, cool and futuristic are also benefits in our modern world, so if you’re looking for the newest breakthrough in smoking technology, and the most hip way to do it, this laser bong is definitely for you.

Conclusion

It should be interesting to watch other comparable models by other companies come out. With enough competition the design will surely be improved on, and with enough time, we can learn the true benefits (and detractions) of using laser bongs. For now, Hitoki certainly hit the nail on the head of cool, and I fully admit, I want to try this bong! Review upcoming.

Hey guys, thanks for stopping by! Welcome to CBDtesters.co / Cannadelics.com, a top web spot, offering well-rounded coverage of the cannabis and psychedelics landscape. Read-thru the site whenever possible to stay informed on the motions of these quickly-morphing industries, and check out The THC Weekly Newsletter, so you’re on top of everything big going on.

The post The Laser Bong You Never Knew You Needed appeared first on CBD Testers.

Successful Stoner Adulting Wordsearch

Successful stoner adulting is an art form. With practice, anyone can master the key techniques. Here are some helpful hacks for common cannabis conundrums. Afterward, nurture that inner child with a wordsearch! Cleaning dabs off your clothes You pick up a dab with a freshly used tool. In a split second, it melts and drops […]

The post Successful Stoner Adulting Wordsearch appeared first on Cannabis News, Lifestyle – Headlines, Videos & Cooking.

Does Vaping Cause Cancer Like Cigarettes?

There’s a lot of contradictory information spewed at us on a regular basis, and its hard to know the truth of things, especially when big corporations have reasons to want you to buy their products, and when governments take money from these entities. When it comes to vaping, tons of smear campaigns are out there, but are they saying anything useful? Unless vaping is tantamount to smoking, isn’t it automatically a better option? Let’s get into it, does vaping cause cancer or heart disease like smoking?

Does vaping cause cancer like cigarettes? While the obvious answer is no, there seems to be plenty of confusion on this matter. This publication covers news stories in the emerging cannabis and psychedelics spaces. Follow along by signing up for the THC Weekly Newsletter, which also nets you access to tons of deals on products like vapes, edibles, and other devices, as well as cannabinoids, like HHC-O, Delta 8Delta 9 THCDelta-10 THCTHCOTHCVTHCP HHC. We do remind, no one should ever buy or use a product they are uncomfortable with.


The detriments of smoking

First off, let’s take a look at standard smoking, and the issues that go with it. The first thing to understand on this topic, is that it’s not actually about cigarettes. Or more specifically, it’s not actually about tobacco. Tobacco can be used medicinally when not smoked, and has been for millennia. No one was dying from it before the use of cigarettes. The term ‘smoke inhalation’ refers to breathing in too much smoke, and the detrimental effects this can have. This refers to anything lit on fire and breathed in, whether its trees, plants, plastics, or tobacco.

Cigarette smoking is simply constant smoke inhalation. It makes the idea of buying organic tobacco, or switching to herbal smokable concoctions, a bit of a joke in the end. Sure, it might get a person away from some of the chemicals of standard processed tobacco, but it won’t get anyone away from the dangers that come from lighting something on fire, and breathing it in. Smoking cigarettes, as constant smoke inhalation, comes with a myriad of health problems, particularly for long-time users.

The bottom-line numbers tell a compelling story when looking at the generals of smoking damage. Every year, approximately 480,000 people die from smoking-related causes. A massive 41,000 of these are from secondhand smoke. As in, 41,000 people a year die from someone else’s smoking habit. In comparison, the US is up-in-arms over the growing drug overdose issue and the rising number of opioid deaths. These deaths account for just over 100,000 a year according to new CDC numbers, which make even opioids pale in comparison to the dangers of smoking.

What about a comparison to vaping? Though vaping hasn’t been around as long as smoking, starting mainly in the early 2000’s, it simply isn’t linked to a large death toll. As of 2020, the CDC could only come up with 68 related deaths, and all deaths were attributable to additives in vape liquid, and not to whatever compound was meant to be vaped, or the vaping itself. It bears mentioning here, that a dry herb vape is not included in this, and that this issue is specifically related to the use of vape cartridges.

Cancer and heart disease from smoking

Smoking is related to a huge number of problems, but the main two which lead to premature death, are cardiovascular issues, and cancer. Just how much damage do cigarettes do in these arenas? The CDC put out information detailing yearly death numbers from examining the years 2005-2009. As smoking has been around well over a hundred years, and reached higher levels of popularity in previous decades to this one, these dates are perfectly fine for understanding the situation today.

In terms of smoking related cancer deaths, approximately 163,700 people die of cancer yearly from smoking. When looking at cardiovascular disease, which includes heart disease, diabetes, and vascular disease, there are 160,000 deaths a year from smoking. There is however, another major class of deaths from smoking, and its related to respiratory diseases like pneumonia, influenza, and COPD. From this grouping there are about 113,100 deaths per year.

Now, let’s make this worse. Remember how 41,000 people die a year just from sitting in the same room as smokers? Well, about 7,333 of these deaths are from lung cancer, and 33,951 are from heart disease. There are that many cancer and heart-related issues, even when the afflicted person isn’t the one with the bad habit.

Does vaping cause cancer?

There is a lot of weird, seemingly nonsensical, information out there trying to tell you vaping is bad. However, when it comes to the actual questions of how to measure this, the answer just leaves more questions. Like why are we being told vaping is dangerous when no statistics back this up? I mean, if it was true, it would be attached to some pretty bad death numbers, right? Well, not exactly…

To be fair, vaping hasn’t been around for as long as smoking. The main surge of e-cigarettes and cannabis vape carts started in the 2010’s. However, as someone with asthma, I can personally attest to the fact that smoking causes damage in me pretty fast, whereas vaping does not. And I know this from how my lungs feel, and how I breathe. Perhaps it is possible to tell if vaping can cause something like cancer or heart disease early on, or at the very least, if it starts to cause the damage that leads in these directions.

cancer

According to the site Cancer Research UK, the answer to the question, does vaping cause cancer, is no. While the organization certainly doesn’t rule out that there could be negative side effects, it specifically states that vaping related deaths so far are only attributable to additives, and are not related to the act of vaping in general. The organization says this:

“You may have heard about vaping causing an outbreak of lung illness in 2019 in the United States. An investigation found the cases were linked to contaminated illegal products. It was not linked to vaping regularly or in the long term. There was no similar outbreak in the UK, and the chemicals of concern are banned in e-cigarettes here. There is no good evidence that e-cigarettes bought from legal places cause lung disease.”

What about secondhand vaping damage, does that exist? According to the same organization, “There is no good evidence that second-hand vapour from e-cigarettes is harmful. As vapes are still relatively new, we can’t be sure there aren’t any long-term effects to people who breathe in someone else’s vapour. But this is unlikely to be harmful.”

The site does, however, go on to repeat the oft mentioned incorrect assertion that, “Passive vaping is not the same as passive smoking. This is because e-cigarettes do not contain tobacco.” E-cigarettes, of course, often do have tobacco, and tobacco was never seen as deadly until it was used in cigarettes. The line that tobacco itself is bad has been repeated so much, that the idea of what smoke inhalation is, is often bypassed, even by the organizations that should really know the difference. Even with this misunderstanding, the site does make clear that there is no link between vaping and cancer.

Does vaping cause cardiovascular disease?

So, does vaping cause cancer? Well, even a cancer organization doesn’t think so, but what about cardiovascular disease? When searching for vaping and cardiovascular issues, a lot of negative sounding articles come up. But what doesn’t, is literally any statistic that backs up an issue. Again, as vaping is a relatively new phenomenon, this doesn’t mean that vaping isn’t associated with cardiovascular issues in the long term. However, there isn’t one statistic right now that says it does. In this review, the most that can be said, is that:

“There are no long-term outcome studies on the cardiovascular risk of vaping electronic cigarettes, but the effects of electronic cigarettes on known risk factors for cardiovascular disease, including neurohumoural activation, oxidative stress and inflammation, endothelial function and thrombosis, have been studied.” It didn’t, however, offer anything more conclusive than saying that risk factors have been studied.

vaping

What’s incredibly troubling, is that the 2019 study that initially made the claim that vaping e-cigarettes leads to a higher risk of heart attacks, was retracted eight months later! Sounds like it was a smear campaign that couldn’t take the heat in the end, and sadly, that article is still referenced all over the internet. No one ever said vaping would be 100% risk-free, but if it requires putting out research so bad it must be retracted to make the point, it says a lot for the lack of real information available to confirm this point. There is currently no statistic that exists about vaping and increased risk of cardiovascular disease.

To take it one step further, this longitudinal analysis E-Cigarette Use and Risk of Cardiovascular Disease: A Longitudinal Analysis of the PATH Study (2013–2019), reported that “Two large cross-sectional studies reported no significant association between exclusive e-cigarette use and cardiovascular disease (CVD).”

Conclusion

Does vaping cause cancer or cardiovascular disease? Well, the jury is technically out until more time goes by and research for long-term use can be collected. What has been made pretty clear on nearly every level, is that vaping is considerably healthier than smoking cigarettes when it comes to both cancer and cardiovascular issues, both of which are increased by smoke inhalation, which vaping is not.

So why is there so much out there screaming about the dangers of vaping? And doing so while hiding or ignoring the incredible death rate of smoking? Perhaps it has more to do with what groups are funneling money into government representative pockets, and less to do with the facts.

Thanks for joining us! We appreciate you stopping by CBDtesters.co / Cannadelics.com, a top internet offering for independent news covering the growing cannabis and psychedelics industries. Read-thru the site frequently to stay informed on everything going on, and subscribe to The THC Weekly Newsletter, so you never miss an important story or awesome product deal.

The post Does Vaping Cause Cancer Like Cigarettes? appeared first on CBD Testers.

South Africa Still Working On New Cannabis Bill

Back in 2020, I reported on South Africa’s legal limbo after a Constitutional Court ruling made cannabis prohibition illegal. What exactly this means for the country has been undefined for the past few years, and South Africa is still working to finalize its Cannabis for Private Purposes bill.

South Africa should have a new cannabis bill soon, which is great, because we’ve been waiting for it since 2018! We’re a publication that focuses on independent coverage of the cannabis and psychedelics fields. You can join in by signing up for the THC Weekly Newsletter, and also get prime access to tons of deals on vapes, edibles and smoking devices. We’ve also got standout offers on cannabinoids, like HHC-O, Delta 8Delta 9 THCDelta-10 THCTHCOTHCVTHCP HHC, which won’t kill your bank account. Head over to our “Best-of” lists to get these deals, and remember to enjoy responsibly!


How it started

Much like many other countries, South Africa instituted laws against cannabis in the early 1920’s. First in 1922 with the Customs and Excise Duty Act, which classified cannabis as a habit-forming drug, and then in 1925 by including cannabis in the country’s Dangerous Drugs list, putting it with the likes of cocaine and opium. Further to that, it was criminalized 100% in 1928 with the Medical, Dental, and Pharmacy Act, which is where it stayed all the way until 2018.

On March 31st, 2017, a judge ruled that it was not constitutional to bar cultivation and use of cannabis for private use. This was done with a justification that this is a non-justifiable personal privacy infringement. A previous case on the matter brought by Gareth Prince about 15 years earlier, focused on the idea of infringement of religious freedoms, but this case was unsuccessful at changing anything.

The 2017 case didn’t include religious aspects, but focused on the privacy rights – or inalienable rights – of the people. The right to privacy is guaranteed under section 14 of the Bill of Rights of South Africa. It states that every individual has the right to lead a private life without government interference. The judge in the ruling made this statement:

“A very high level of protection is given to the individual’s intimate personal sphere of life and the maintenance of its basic preconditions and there is a final untouchable sphere of human freedom that is beyond interference from any public authority. So much so that, in regard to this most intimate core of privacy, no justifiable limitation thereof can take place… This inviolable core is left behind once an individual enters into relationships with persons outside this closest intimate sphere; the individual’s activities then acquire a social dimension and the right of privacy in this context becomes subject to limitation.”

However, as this was a regular court, in order for this ruling to have full effect, it needed to be confirmed by the Constitutional Court. When expected appeals to the decision came in, this was done. In September 2018, the Constitutional Court made a ruling on the matter which confirmed the ruling of the lower court, setting it as law. Some of the included points of the ruling, were the following:

  • Cannabis use is permitted by an adult when done in private.
  • Cannabis use is not permitted around children, or anyone who does not consent.
  • Cannabis is not permitted in public, or for anything beyond personal use.
  • Cannabis is permitted for private cultivation so long as its for personal use.

If all this sounds familiar, it’s because it’s a similar scenario to what’s going on in Mexico, where a court ruling created legalization case law, but which still requires a government bill for all particulars. In both cases, it was the use of personal sovereignty laws which led the way to make these changes. In South Africa, the Court ruling set a legal precedent, but it didn’t make clear the specifics of what is allowed. Since that time, draft legislation has come up, but nothing has been passed.

Cannabis for Private Purposes bill

After what has been a very long wait, the government of South Africa is getting closer to releasing formal legislation, in the form of the Cannabis for Private Purposes bill. This bill has been circulating since 2020, and has been updated throughout that time based on the comments of different people and organizations. Current additions were approved by the National Assembly on March 31st of this year, meaning the bill is now in a second round of public meetings.

Some additional points within the South Africa cannabis bill include:

  • Recreational cannabis commercial activities.
  • Rules for cultivation, possession and supply of cannabis for members of organizations specifically related to religious and cultural purposes.
  • Individual privacy rights for adults to use cannabis for medical purposes.
South African cannabis

It also defines what a ‘private space’ is. The definition includes: a building, house, room, shed, hut, tent, mobile home, caravan, boat, or any part of one of the above. Essentially, anything that can be closed (or is away from other things), and where the public doesn’t have direct access, is a private space.

Since its still open for public comment, nothing is a done deal yet. The latest to give comments is the country’s largest trade federation, the Congress of South African Trade Unions (Cosatu), which supports the legalization of the plant on all fronts. It submit its comments at the end of May. Though the organization supports legalization measures, it said the current bill is ‘unrealistically bureaucratic and cumbersome’, and needs a lot of reworking.

In fact, it went as far as to say that the legislation is way too restrictive, and doesn’t decriminalize the plant as much as it should. This is highlighted by how the organization sees the issue of cannabis regulation for religious purposes, and its dislike of rules created to monitor how people use cannabis in general.

Regardless of edits, none of this means that South Africa will have a regulated market. That’s one of the big differences between how South Africa and Mexico are handling things. Mexico is expected to have a regulated recreational market, whereas South Africa is legalizing private use and cultivation of the plant only.

How personal sovereignty leads to cannabis rights

The legal change in South Africa was a result of a court case that relied on personal sovereignty laws, which are a part of inalienable rights. Inalienable rights are rights that every human has, and that a government can’t take away. They relate to natural rights, or what some would call God-given rights, and they are not to be altered by governmental laws. Personal sovereignty is the same as self-ownership. This is considered an individual’s right for bodily integrity, and to be the sole controller of themselves. Personal sovereignty, is an inalienable right.

Three countries now have updated cannabis laws due to court cases involving personal sovereignty rights. South Africa’s Constitutional Court case was in 2018, making the 2017 verdict an official one in terms of the country’s laws. Though it doesn’t seek to set up a regulated market, it will allow for the possession, use, and cultivation of the plant privately.

inalienable rights

2018 was a popular year for inalienable rights to kick in. Over in Georgia, another Constitutional Court case ended with a verdict that overturned prohibition. The Court ruled that it’s not constitutional to punish the use of cannabis, as it poses no threat to others. It said a punishment for cannabis use is restrictive of personal freedoms, so long as no 3td party is affected. However, Georgia never mentioned needing a bill to further clarify anything, and the country now resides in a weird gray area, where cultivation and buying/selling are illegal, but possession and use are totally cool.

The other example is Mexico, which became the 4th legalized country officially in 2021, when the Supreme Court dropped laws of prohibition for private use, upon the government simply not doing its job. It unofficially became the 4th country back in 2018, when the Supreme Court ruled on the last of five consecutive cases in favor of legal cannabis use and cultivation. It said, as personally developed human beings, we must be allowed to pick our own recreational activities without the government interfering. When the government did not turn in a corresponding bill on time, the Supreme Court went ahead and dropped prohibition laws a year ago. We’re still waiting on the full bill to begin the official sales market.

Conclusion

Truth is, none of the three countries to make legal updates based on constitutional courts, have totally gotten it together yet. Georgia is in a strange legal limbo, and Mexico and South Africa are both waiting on specific bills to pass. We certainly have to wait a bit longer on all fronts, but it looks like South Africa is getting that much closer to a formal legalization/decriminalization with updates to its cannabis draft bill. The question now is, which will be first, South Africa or Mexico?

Hello readers! We appreciate you stopping by CBDtesters.co / Cannadelics.com, a premiere web offering for fully-rounded news coverage of the growing cannabis and psychedelics fields. Join us frequently for a daily dose of news updates, and subscribe to The THC Weekly Newsletter, so you’re never late on getting a story. We like to remind: there are tons of cannabis products on the market, and we don’t promote anyone buy a product they are uncomfortable with using.

The post South Africa Still Working On New Cannabis Bill appeared first on CBD Testers.

CBD Pioneer Elixinol is Helping You Rest Easy

Whether the result of a demanding lifestyle or medical issues, improper sleep health affects 50 to 70 million Americans of all ages and stages. Lack of sleep can impact alertness, reaction speeds, learning ability, mood, hand-eye coordination and short-term memory accuracy. The new Sleep Collection from Elixinol promotes a quality night’s rest while also supporting calmness and relaxation.

Considered a pioneer in the hemp industry, Elixinol was founded in 2014 with a mission to deliver high-quality CBD products that provide real results for real people. As one of the first CBD brands on the market, the company has spent the last seven years focusing on the science, research and creation of world-class cannabinoid products.

Founder Paul Benhaim has been working with the hemp plant for more than 25 years and is considered an expert in the industrial hemp industry. The environmental and wellness advocate was first attracted to hemp as a dietary supplement and, according to an interview with The Big Smoke, he has “strived to create the best quality products, for the best end-user experience through science and technology, using whole plant-based products as naturally as possible.”

The Elixinol Experience

Elixinol’s products are formulated for a targeted experience, whether that’s for supporting balance, recovery, immunity or sleep.

Data suggests that 25% of adults report inadequate sleep for at least 15 out of every 30 days. Now, those seeking more natural sleep remedies can turn to Elixinol’s line of sleep supporting CBD products, which includes capsules, gummies and oils. Let’s take a closer look at these products and how they work.

Sleep Good Night Capsules

This full-spectrum blend contains 15mg of CBD and 2mg of melatonin in each capsule to help you relax and get a solid night of sleep. The small amount of melatonin in Sleep Good Nights Capsules won’t leave you feeling groggy the next morning. Additionally, these capsules are vegan, non-GMO, gluten-free, lactose-free, cruelty-free and include supercritical CO2-extracted full-spectrum hemp oil.

Sleep Gummies THC Free

Elixinol CBD Sleep Gummies

Elixinol’s Sleep CBD Gummies contain natural fruit extract and are packaged in a discreet, pocket-sized container. Each gummy contains 15mg of CBD and 2mg of CBN. Made with broad-spectrum hemp extract the gummies contain no detectable amounts of THC, are GMO-free and suitable for vegans and vegetarians.

Liposome Technology

Elixinol is one of the few CBD companies featuring products with liposome technology for efficient absorption. Liposomes enhance the capabilities of the active compounds encased in an aqueous interior or lipid bilayer and are typically found in pharmaceutical delivery systems. Essentially, they create microscopic bubbles that encapsulate CBD and allow for a more effective delivery. This means your body receives more CBD per serving that might otherwise be lost in the digestive process.

Elixinol has two liposome products: Sleep Rapid Rest and Everyday Rapid Reset.

Sleep Rapid Rest Liposome

Sleep Rapid Rest contains a custom blend of CBD (5mg per serving) and CBN, a cannabinoid that’s known for helping with sleep, along with other calming ingredients, including chamomile and lemon balm. Sleep Rapid Rest supports feelings of calm and relaxation, and the advanced liposome technology will help you hit the pillow with purpose.

Everyday Rapid Reset Liposome

Sometimes, you just need a little help resetting. Everyday Rapid Reset is here to help you relieve any occasional stress, help physical discomfort, and just get that overall balanced feeling. This custom blend of broad-spectrum hemp extract contains 5mg of CBD per serving and is flavored naturally with orange and lemon extracts for a zesty pick-me-up.

Elixinol CBD Tinctures

Elixinol & CBD Education

All Elixinol products are certified by the U.S. Hemp Authority, so you can rest assured the products you’re consuming have been stringently regulated and tested. Elixinol conducts rigorous third-party laboratory testing and quality control across its full range of products and provides clear and detailed certificates of analysis.

Elixinol only uses the cleanest, highest-quality extraction processes that leave behind no harsh solvents or chemicals. By using CO2 extraction, the resulting high-quality hemp extract is better for you and the environment.

Finally, Elixinol is a resource for education and transparency for consumers. In 2016, Elixinol became the first company in the world to receive the seal of approval for its CBD products from the cannabis research, education and support group, the Realm of Caring.

“Education and research is an important core mission of Elixinol,” Benhaim explains. “The more people understand about CBD, the more they can make informed choices, and we want to help them get the best information and the highest-quality product.”

The post CBD Pioneer Elixinol is Helping You Rest Easy appeared first on Cannabis Now.

Cannabis Blamed for America’s Mass-Shooting Epidemic

Another week, another mass shooting to blame on cannabis. Six days after an 18-year-old who’d just bought two AR-15-style rifles on his birthday murdered 19 fourth graders and two teachers at an elementary school in Uvalde, TX, Fox News host Laura Ingraham asked her roughly 2.2 million viewers whether the real problem wasn’t actually cannabis legalization.

“Why aren’t people in general not talking more about the pot-psychosis violent-behavior connection?” asked Ingraham, who added that anyone advocating gun-control measures—such as the 90% of Americans who support universal background checks—as a rational response to Uvalde are “completely oblivious to what the legalization of marijuana has done and is doing to an entire generation of Americans with violent consequences.”

At first blush, injecting cannabis into the conversation over mass shootings seemed like a fresh spin, another effort at misdirection to steer the conversation toward “hardening” schools, or arming teachers or vague jeremiads about “mental health”—anything but a discussion about the easy availability of weapons or that particular weapon, the AR-15-style rifle, the instrument of choice in a mass-shooting in Buffalo the week before that claimed another ten innocent lives.

But, in fact, Ingraham lifted her screed nearly verbatim from the Substack account of disgraced COVID conspiracy theorist Alex Berenson, a former reporter at The New York Times turned novelist turned multi-purpose conservative contrarian. Berenson noticed a post-publication change to a Times item that initially reported an acquaintance’s claim that the Uvalde shooter was mad that his grandmother “didn’t let him smoke weed or do what he wanted.”

That detail later disappeared from the story, which for Berenson was evidence of… well, not much, aside for more support for his pet theory. “Cannabis causes psychosis,” as he wrote. “Psychosis causes violence,” he added, including, an unmistakable syllogistic link, mass shootings.

It’s a serious charge, that’s also completely unserious. Serious observers have already roundly dismissed this fresh demonization of cannabis. Nonetheless, it’s gaining new life as conservative commentators and politicians embrace cannabis as a method to stoke grievance in America’s ongoing culture war.

Rebirth of a Notion

Before he became known as the COVID-19 pandemic’s “wrongest man” and got himself kicked off Twitter for claiming vaccines were worthless (or, actually, dangerous), Berenson’s angle was being a cannabis legalization contrarian. In pursuit of this chimera, he peddled an anti-legalization polemic that, according to a mass letter signed by 100 researchers in 2019, used “flawed pop science and ideological polemics” to “promote some of the worst myths about people of color and people with mental illness”—including the idea, unsupported by science, that cannabis makes them violent.

In serious circles, such as the researchers and clinicians who signed onto the letter labeling Berenson’s theories as worthless warmed-over garbage left over from the Just Say No era, the idea that cannabis legalization is connected to America’s mass-shooting epidemic is laughed out of the room.

But Ingraham’s appropriation of Berenson’s exploded theories set off a chain reaction in the right-wing media echo chamber, where, along with virulent transphobia, cannabis is being tested out as a front in the culture war.

On June 6, the conservative Wall Street Journal’s even more conservative editorial page said that, if it were true that the Uvalde shooter smoked weed—an enormous, Hollywood-sign-sized “if”—“it would fit a pattern.”

“Mass shooters at Rep. Gabby Giffords’s constituent meeting in Tucson, AZ (2011); a movie theater in Aurora, CO (2012); the Pulse nightclub in Orlando (2016); the First Baptist Church in Sutherland Springs, TX (2017); and Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, FL (2018) were reported to be marijuana users,” the WSJ opined. “It could be a coincidence, but increasing evidence suggests a connection.”

(It bears mentioning that most of those shooters were also AR-15-style rifle users, but that, surely, is a coincidence.)

The Missing Link

In addition to noting that the main link between mass shooters wasn’t that they used weapons but that they smoked weed, Allysia Finley, the piece’s author, cited a few studies in her argument. This included a meta-analysis, published in The American Journal of Psychiatry in May 2020, that tried to investigate an association between youth and “the risk of perpetuating physical violence.” That meta-analysis, led by researchers in Canada—where, just for funsies, cannabis was legalized nationwide in 2018—found a “moderate association between cannabis use and physical violence.”

The study’s authors didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment from Cannabis Now on how their work is currently being used to steer American attention away from gun control—which is much stricter in Canada than in the US, and which has legalized cannabis, and which doesn’t seem to be gripped by the same mass shooting epidemic.

On June 13, the conservative Washington Examiner hopped on the bullshit train, adding its own fresh load of trash to the pile. “One way to reverse growing rates of violent crime,” posed the newspaper’s editorial board, using most of the same arguments as the Journal, “may be to recriminalize the use of marijuana.”

Though violence absolutely surged during the COVID-19 pandemic, on the aggregate, the US hasn’t been this peaceful for decades. Violent crime, as Pew Research found, dropped 49% between 1993—right around when New York City launched a decade-long war on joints—and 2019, by which time more than a dozen states had legalized adult-use cannabis. In fact, a 2018 study found that the rates of certain crimes dropped in areas that had recently legalized cannabis.

You could just as easily (and more convincingly) argue that legalization has made the US more peaceful. That at least might be a little more honest, if a little naive, as the causes of violence are known to be complex, an overlapping web of material circumstances.

Political Quackery

Rather than grapple with the broader set of facts or engage with skeptics, the conservative echo-chamber is sealing itself off. In a letter to The Wall Street Journal’s editorial board that the newspaper didn’t print, Paul Armentano, the deputy director of the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws, pointed out a slew of other studies, including a data analysis from the RAND Corporation that tried to find a link between cannabis dispensaries and crime—and failed to do so.

“Claims that cannabis use causes violence are frankly absurd when you consider that there are tens of millions of regular cannabis consumers in the US who have never engaged in any violent activity and there have been no conclusive studies showing an association between violence and either cannabis use or its legalization,” said Morgan Fox, NORML’s political director, in a statement provided to Cannabis Now.

“Cherry-picking anecdotal instances and pretending that they represent a ‘disturbing trend’ when the experiences of legal cannabis markets here and abroad say otherwise is just the newest iteration of a long-used tactic by unscrupulous prohibitionists to demonize this substance and the people that use it,” he added. “Such assertions are pure political quackery, and an attempt to distract from the real issues at hand as well as the overwhelming successes that states have achieved by regulating cannabis.”

So far, it doesn’t seem like Berenson’s shameless recycling of his increasingly dusty conspiracy theory is making much headway among the US public. But as mass shootings and dead children continue to pile up, and opponents of gun reform seek any other sacrificial lamb other than reasonable restrictions on who can own an AR-15, cannabis is taking another familiar turn in the barrel.

The post Cannabis Blamed for America’s Mass-Shooting Epidemic appeared first on Cannabis Now.