7 Diseases That Can Be Treated with Medical Marijuana

Over the past four decades, treating diseases with medical marijuana has been on the rise. The credibility of cannabis has grown in the medical community as a possible solution to treat chronic conditions and diseases. While marijuana hasn’t demonstrated that it is the ultimate solution or cure to end a disease in general, it can help soothe the effects of chronic diseases, inhibit diseases from developing at a rapid pace and possibly become a replacement for opioids to handle emotional and physical pain.

This is how marijuana positively contributes to the following seven diseases:

1. Depression

A study from the University of Buffalo’s Research Institute on Addictions tested how marijuana affected chronic stress in rats and used this information to coincide with equivalent human responses. In this experiment, researchers found that when the rats were bound by rodent restraints for long periods of time — a source of chronic stress —  the production of their brain’s endocannabinoids rapidly decreased. In regards to human beings in long-term stressful situations, these receptors influence how well a person can process thoughts, gauge emotions and behave, and they even can impact a person’s cognitive ability to handle pain and anxiety. When there is a lack of endocannabinoid production in the brain, an individual is at risk of developing depression. Marijuana can play a role in restoring cannabinoids such as tetrahydrocannabinol and cannabidiol in the endocannabinoid system, and helping ease the depressing.

2. Anxiety

Like depression, anxiety reduces the endocannabinoid production in the brain and inhibits an individual’s ability to cope with pain and stress. However, the use of marijuana to treat anxiety can go either way: It can either deplete anxiety or increase it. While marijuana is meant to bring a person into a tranquil state, some individuals possess a brain chemistry that simply does not react well with the plant’s chemicals. In other cases, marijuana has been able to prevent unwanted anxiety attacks, stimulate a calmer “fight-or-flight response” to stress and all-together provide the user with a “high” that releases any tension in the body.

3. Epilepsy

Given that epilepsy is a cause of seizures (also known as “electrical storms”), medical scientists have created a specific CBD formula that is proven safe for individuals to use because it possessed little to no effect on the sensitive psychoactivity of epilepsy patients. Some of the first tests with marijuana, such as a 2015 test at the NYU Langone Medical Center, actually demonstrated that it had the ability to suppress seizures. Because of this, researchers and developers have been able to manipulate marijuana compounds to tailor to an individual’s epileptic condition, keeping in mind that this disease affects multiple people differently.

4. Alzheimer’s

Marijuana diminishes the intensity of hallucinations, improves poor sleeping habits and stops aggressive outbursts suffered by individuals with Alzheimer’s. The main source of Alzheimer’s is its rapid production of beta-amyloid proteins, which cause plaques to develop in the brain and dangerously reduce the necessary peptides in amino acids that enable one to properly function. Most importantly, marijuana can slow this build-up of proteins to prevent existing Alzheimer’s from deteriorating an individual’s brain.

5. HIV/AIDS

 The HIV virus weakens the immune system, but marijuana softens the impact of disorienting and uncomfortable symptoms of a weak immune system, such as nausea, muscle and joint pain, loss of appetite, severe headaches and fevers. Furthermore, in this particular study from Spain in 2008, marijuana was proven to prevent chemical reactions in the body that create HIV compounds.

6. Cancer

While marijuana does not fundamentally cure cancer or diminish its symptoms, it is able to reduce the discomfort in certain treatments that many cancer patients undergo. Cancer patients who use medical marijuana endure a lessened amount of inevitable nausea and vomiting caused by their chemotherapy treatments. Furthermore, cannabinoids improve appetite and can ease the neuropathic pain that is a result of severe nerve damage caused by chemotherapy.

7. Drug Addiction

Though it seems counter-intuitive, recovering addicts can use medical marijuana to reverse the effects of opioid addiction, decrease unwanted drug cravings and even diminish the emotional and physical symptoms of addiction. This is due to the chemical compounds of cannabidiol, which binds to brain receptors that induce a safer “high” and counteract impairments and mental damage caused by long-term drug abuse. Lastly, marijuana can even replace addictive painkillers since it targets the same nerve receptors as opioids without putting the user at risk for chronic addiction.

TELL US, what diseases do you treat with cannabis?

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Mind-Body Health: Cannabis & the Endocannabinoid System

If you’re new to cannabis, you’ve likely asked “How does it work?”

Elise Keller was diagnosed with breast cancer at age 33, and she explores this same question in her TED Talk entitled “The Surprising Connection Between Cannabis and Mind-Body Health.”

Keller considered herself to be a healthy person. Frustrated by her diagnoses, she sought out ways to come to terms with cancer and move forward.

At the recommendation of her nurse and other patients, she tried medical cannabis, which helped immensely with her pain, nausea and anxiety. After meeting patients with a range of illnesses who all are using cannabis for treatment, Keller wondered how it is possible that cannabis can help with so many unrelated illnesses.

“In a nutshell, I learned that the reason cannabis was working for so many different conditions is because it interacts directly with our body’s own endocannabinoid system, responsible for maintaining balance in the body,” Keller explained in her presentation. “Used properly, the plant can help activate, tone and support the endocannabinoid system when it’s out of balance,” she further explained.

Many are unfamiliar with the endocannabinoid system, which has even been dubbed the body’s own “master system” due to its role in maintaining balance over all bodily networks.

In her 15 minute TED Talk, Keller offers a digestible break down of how the endocannabinoid system works, explaining how mind, body and medicine are equally important in keeping it strong and healthy.

Understanding how the cannabis plant interacts with this system can further support one’s journey towards achieving truly integrated whole-person health.

Watch the video to learn about Elise Keller’s own discoveries around cannabis and mind-body health.

TELL US, do you use cannabis as medicine?

The post Mind-Body Health: Cannabis & the Endocannabinoid System appeared first on Cannabis Now.

Mind-Body Health: Cannabis & the Endocannabinoid System

If you’re new to cannabis, you’ve likely asked “How does it work?”

Elise Keller was diagnosed with breast cancer at age 33, and she explores this same question in her TED Talk entitled “The Surprising Connection Between Cannabis and Mind-Body Health.”

Keller considered herself to be a healthy person. Frustrated by her diagnoses, she sought out ways to come to terms with cancer and move forward.

At the recommendation of her nurse and other patients, she tried medical cannabis, which helped immensely with her pain, nausea and anxiety. After meeting patients with a range of illnesses who all are using cannabis for treatment, Keller wondered how it is possible that cannabis can help with so many unrelated illnesses.

“In a nutshell, I learned that the reason cannabis was working for so many different conditions is because it interacts directly with our body’s own endocannabinoid system, responsible for maintaining balance in the body,” Keller explained in her presentation. “Used properly, the plant can help activate, tone and support the endocannabinoid system when it’s out of balance,” she further explained.

Many are unfamiliar with the endocannabinoid system, which has even been dubbed the body’s own “master system” due to its role in maintaining balance over all bodily networks.

In her 15 minute TED Talk, Keller offers a digestible break down of how the endocannabinoid system works, explaining how mind, body and medicine are equally important in keeping it strong and healthy.

Understanding how the cannabis plant interacts with this system can further support one’s journey towards achieving truly integrated whole-person health.

Watch the video to learn about Elise Keller’s own discoveries around cannabis and mind-body health.

TELL US, do you use cannabis as medicine?

The post Mind-Body Health: Cannabis & the Endocannabinoid System appeared first on Cannabis Now.

A Cancer Survivor’s Guide to Using Cannabis to Cope With Chemotherapy

When I was diagnosed with Stage 3 colon cancer, I decided to get my California medical cannabis card and used medicinal cannabis products for effective symptom management. This helped me avoid taking other pharmaceuticals that could have caused further complications during treatment. There are so many things I wish I would have known then that I know now, but my expertise today helps other patients make empowered choices about their cannabis use.

My first experience in a dispensary left me feeling as though I was doing something wrong and had me fearful of asking questions. When I did ask questions, I received vague answers. In turn, I made mistakes in my self-medication and, though not fatal, at times it was uncomfortable and inconvenient.

Part of the disconnect with my dispensary experience was that I didn’t know how to find what worked for me. We have a broad general knowledge of how cannabis — with its many modes of medicating, chemotypes and cultivars — manifests in the body. But human beings are walking chemistry experiments, which means there will be differences in our reactions. We need to find our personal patterns with cannabis (or any ingested substance for that matter) by paying close attention to what we choose and how (or if) it helps to have a better understanding of how to use cannabis as medicine.

Journaling is a great way to keep track of the types of cannabis you’re using and document their effects. What worked, what didn’t work and why — along with how much of the medicine you took — are important things to track and relay to a dispensary during your next visit. The key is to find the lowest dosage in the appropriate ratios that create the desired effect in your body.

Chemotherapy’s side effects take a huge toll on everyday life. The experience of having to get so much sicker in order to get better impacts not only your body, but your mental health as well. Cannabis can help manage symptoms stemming from both the body and mind and, in some instances, can act as a preventative measure against further damage.

Here are some of the more common side effects of chemotherapy and how cannabis interacted with each of them:

(Please note that each type of chemo has its own particular side effects and some of us are more sensitive to these drug treatments than others.) 

Fatigue

Cancer treatments can leave you wiped out or overstimulated. Inhaling small amounts of uplifting sativa flowers or using a sativa-based low dosage (2.5 – 5 mg THC) sublingual preparation (dissolved under the tongue) can lift your mood without being too sedating.

Insomnia

Insomnia is a common symptom of chemotherapy. If you are having problems getting to sleep, inhaling indica flowers can be helpful. If you are having problems staying asleep, using an indica edible will keep you peaceful overnight. Remember, if you feel a little “stoned over” in the morning, you should take down the volume of the edible. In either case, if there is anxiety around sleep or inflammation with pain, a 1:1 ratio of CBD and THC may be more appropriate.

Infection & Immune System Issues

It’s important to note that though there have never been fatalities from cannabis use alone, there are significant risks around using untested products, dried flowers in particular, if you have a compromised immune system. Untested products can contain mold, fungus or mildew that might mildly irritate someone with a hardy immune system but can sicken or even kill someone with a compromised immune system. Many states require testing nowadays, but if the state where you live doesn’t, ask companies whose products you want to use if they test and ask to see the reports.

Nausea & Vomiting

Using THC in an edible or smokable format during chemo helped me to forgo using anti-nausea drugs after my first day of treatment. For me, that was huge, as the antiemetics proscribed to treat nausea have constipating side effects that, for a colon cancer patient, can be deadly. It’s important to note that though CBD ratios help with nausea, they can also act as an anorectic, which is problematic if you’re already having issues with eating. Eating candied ginger will also help with nausea.

Decreased Appetite

Smoking or eating small amounts of THC will help pique appetite. For patients that are particularly sensitive to THC, I will often recommend trying the non-euphoric cannabinoid THCA. If you do need some CBD in your regimen around meal times, try a 1:1 CBD to THC ratio in either an edible or smokable format because the introduction of THC can help counter CBD’s appetite-reducing properties. I always like to give some non-cannabis advice around this issue as well. The book that saved me while going through treatment is called “The Cancer-Fighting Kitchen” by Rebecca Katz. This book addresses the nutritional challenges of treatment and offers great recipes to address a number of symptoms and get you eating again. I can’t praise it enough.

Anticipatory Nausea & Anxiety

The night before or the day of chemo can cause anxiety and anticipatory nausea. Higher CBD ratios such as 18:1 CBD to THC in an edible or tincture can help take down the jitters and nausea while keeping you clear-headed.

Constipation From Opioid Usage & Opiate Withdrawal

Another challenge during my treatment was using opioids. There were times I needed them for pain management, such as when I had my colon re-sectioned and the tumor removed, or for the intense discomfort I felt from my neuropathy. But the constipating effects were challenging, as were the withdrawal symptoms I felt when I weaned myself off after two weeks of using opioids after surgery. Using THC helped me lower my opiate use by amplifying the analgesic effects of Norco, the medication I was taking, without creating danger. It smoothed out the withdrawal effects as well — the restlessness, pain and sleeplessness disappeared once I started adding cannabis to the mix. Another great tool for avoiding constipation is something you can make at home called “power pudding.” It’s a home remedy involving prunes and bran and you can find many recipes for it online.

Mouth, Tongue & Throat Problems

Chemotherapy targets rapidly dividing cells in the body and does not discern which are cancerous or not. This is why some of us have upset bowels and diarrhea, or experience mouth, tongue and throat discomfort when receiving chemotherapy treatment. Cannabis is great for soothing pain, taking down inflammation and helping in the healing process. Tinctures rich in CBD are especially helpful. However, if you are experiencing mouth irritation, it would not be a good idea to use an alcohol-based tincture, as it will further irritate mucous membranes.

Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy (CIPN)

The platinum salts — including oxaliplatin and cisplatin — used in chemotherapy, along with other chemotherapeutic agents, are known to cause neuropathy in patients. Neuropathy is weakness and pain that one feels, usually in the hands and feet, thanks to damage to peripheral nerves. Some people feel it the first round of chemo, others later in treatment and we all feel it in different intensities and have different recovery times. I am seven years out of chemo and I still suffer from neuropathy. A 2014 study found that CBD prevents neuropathic pain and thermal sensitivity, while not negatively affecting nervous system function or the efficacy of the chemotherapy treatment. Taken before, during and after treatment, patients have reported not getting neuropathy, experiencing it to a lesser degree and bouncing back much faster with less residual pain and numbness.

Skin Changes

Chemotherapy can cause dry skin and inflammation from radiation. Luckily, the skin loves cannabis. Topicals are completely non-euphoric, which makes them a great mediator to use at any time and ideal for those who need symptom relief without euphoric effects. Often times, I’ll suggest a patient use the same high-CBD tincture they are taking for anxiety or pain and apply it as a topical for irritation from radiation. CBD takes down the inflammation and THC helps mitigate pain — and collectively, they help the skin heal so much faster. A topical salve with a 1:1 ratio of CBD and THC will heal dry and inflamed skin with great emollient effects.

After chemo, many patients may find they are still experiencing side effects such as anxiety, residual pain and depression. Healing from chemotherapy is a long process. The cannabis knowledge gained through treatment can also help address this phase in symptom management. In addition, be kind to yourself. As survivors, we must take a restorative approach to healing and learn how to be ourselves in a whole new way.

TELL US, have you or a loved one used cannabis as part of coping with chemotherapy’s side effects?

Originally published in the print edition of Cannabis Now. LEARN MORE

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Fighting cancer with cannabinoids

Cannabics Pharmeceuticals (OTCQB: CNBX) has conducted research focusing on the effect of certain cannabinoids fighting against cancer. The company, which pursues personalized cannabis-based medicines, found promising effects with two cannabinoids, CBC (Cannabichromene) and CBG (Cannabigerol.) When testing these cannabis compounds at their High Throughput Screening (HTS) facility in Israel, they found them to display anti-tumor […]

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THCa Should Not Be Replaced With CBD

Knowledge of cannabis‘s clinical potential has blossomed greatly. One procreator of this bloom has recently been demanding our perceptions shift once more – into acidic cannabinoids like THCA and CBDA. Raphael Mechoulam coined the entourage effect. With the help of colleagues across the globe, innovators like Raphael have been able to hone the cannabis users […]

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On Being Seven Years Pharmaceutical And Cancer-Free

In 2012, seven years ago this October, I was staring down a clean ultrasound, with the technician telling onlookers, “It must be a technical error,” as they could not find the cancerous mass that was just there, less than three months prior.

The image seen in both the first mammogram and follow-up ultrasound showed a large, white spider-web-like mass in my right breast, indicating it was Lobular carcinoma – a mass, not a tumor that could be confused with a cyst.

Just 10 to 15 percent of all women in the U.S. present with this type of mass. My sister was diagnosed just a few years prior, undergoing a partial mastectomy, chemo-therapy, and follow-up radiation – with nearly three years of misery suffered. 

Called to Advocate

I was working as a television producer in Los Angeles, when I was brought up to Humboldt County to produce a news show. Cancer was the last thing I thought would happen to me, but as it turned out, Humboldt was a good place for me to get cancer. 

Pearl Moon of Bud Sisters of Southern Humboldt got wind of my situation and delivered a small jar of cannabis oil, telling me to eat small bits with a toothpick, to get used to the 80 to 90 percent activated THC. 

I didn’t think it would work. It did. And now I’m celebrating seven years of, not only being cancer-free, but pharmaceutical free, as well. 

I’m also celebrating seven years of writing for you all in the cannabis space. I already had a voice in media and immediately began writing of my experience. Wouldn’t everyone want to know about this? Turns out my newfound knowledge was a curse, as well as a blessing.

Seven years of preaching to the choir, due to mainstream media’s hands tied via the U.S. Government’s refusal to admit cannabis is indeed remedy. 

Courtesy of Sharon Letts

From Respect to Disbelief

When I was in mainstream media I was respected – people believed what I reported. After I crossed over, even my partner at the time didn’t believe the cannabis oil put my cancer into remission. He just wanted to smoke my oil to get high. 

My own sister said I was “addicted to marijuana.” Friends I’d known for years backed away. Some told me directly that they just didn’t want to hear about it, as the topic consumed my life in more ways than just writing about it. For once you know the truth, once you are helped, you are compelled to share – compelled to help others. And that’s exactly what rabbit hole I fell into. 

I couldn’t sit on a park bench without someone sitting beside me in need. It was as if the hand of God or the Universe dropped them next to me. Slowly, as the conversations unfolded, it was soon revealed they were ill or knew someone who was. Or, they would ultimately ask what I did for a living. When I told them I was a writer, they would ask what would became a dreaded question, “What do you write about?”

For the past seven years, my standard line has been, “I write internationally on cannabis as medicine.” And then the flood gates open. I’ve received every response imaginable – from disbelief, to stupid stoner jokes, to watching their faces change in desperation as they convey a story after story of heartbreak and pain, either personally or of a loved one, suffering with no help from cancer or some other ailment ravaging their body, the family, and their bank accounts.

On Being Seven Years Pharmaceutical And Cancer-Free
Photographed by Jeannie Herer/ Courtesy of Sharon Letts

Covering Cannabis

I covered both Colorado and Washington States before and after legalization; then Oregon, Nevada and California. What I’ve observed is, more healing happens when a state legalizes, as people feel more comfortable to share and test the waters. That edible taken to get high becomes a medible immediately, if the partaker is actually a patient with real ailments – with painkillers and sleeping pills the first to go.

California’s Compassionate Care Program, that would become the model for the eventual 34 states now legal for medical cannabis, is going away, as are other caregiving and co-operative programs, in favor of recreational retail shops. 

It’s ironic because cannabis is still remedy. Yet, with the government stubbornly insisting it isn’t, the laws are being set-up as if it weren’t – while the healing in legal states increases; and opioid usage declines.

They say that ignorance is bliss, and I must say I have to agree. When I was working in mainstream media, I thought I knew a lot – but, I didn’t know shit. I only knew what they wanted me to. 

My own editor at the Times-Standard in Eureka – Humboldt’s county seat – wouldn’t let me write about cannabis as remedy. Marijuana was firmly in the crime section only. With legalization, it’s crossed over into the business and finance sections, but the health editors don’t know how to broach the subject at all. They don’t know how to ask the questions to further the conversation. 

Stigma over Truth

In seven years, with myriad interviews with patients helped for numerous ailments and disorders, I’ve learned a lot, and am strong in my confidence in my work and the plant. But the stigma is still alive and well. Just a few weeks ago I was introduced at a party as a “stoner,” with a laugh and no apology. The stigma gives permission to be insensitive. My rebuttal was that I was actually an internationally known writer in the cannabis space, and a television producer. Put that in your pipe and smoke it.

The good news is, I don’t really get sick too often. In seven years I’m still healthy on a plant-based remedy protocol, using cannabis in different modes of delivery, daily. 

I still struggle with depression, fatigue, and assorted mild maladies, but overall, at 60, I’m doing pretty damn well, thanks to the plant. 

If you would have told me in high school in the 70s I would be doing what I’m doing now, I would have accused you of taking the entire tab. This life is a long and winding path of surprises. I’m grateful for my path to Humboldt, for Pearl Moon showing up on my doorstep with her little jar of oil. 

In the next seven years my cancer could come back worse, or I could be hit by a truck. One thing is for sure, today, I’m looking forward to where the plant takes me next. I’ve come back full circle to television, and am actively developing and shopping intelligent programming on the plant. Who knows? Maybe the universe will throw me another bone, and I can continue to turn heads and change minds on a grander scale. Stay tuned.

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Replacing Ice with Cannabinoids: Numbing Pains

Medics have treated injuries with ice and heat for thousands of years. Therapy by numbing is an obvious asset, but a more intricate event occurs. The act of icing and applying heat to an injury falls deeply in tune with cannabinoid therapy. In fact, THCV and Cannabigerol (CBG) directly effects the same cooling sensation as […]

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Willie Nelson’s Buddy Won A Nobel Prize For Developing A Cancer Drug

To look at Jim Allison, you wouldn’t immediately think that he’s a Nobel Prize-winning immunologist. He looks more like a harmonica player, which he is, too. In fact, you can occasionally catch him onstage playing with his longtime friend, Willie Nelson. But as a new feature-length documentary reveals, Jim Allison is actually the reason why certain people with melanoma have their lives back. Narrated by Woody Harrelson, Jim Allison: Breakthrough features interviews with Allison’s family, professors, reporters, and colleagues, as well as a cancer patient who tried every kind of therapy without any success—until she tried Allison’s breakthrough drug, Ipilimumab.

Allison was born in 1948 and grew up in Texas, the son of a housewife and doctor. His two older brothers called him “diamond-head” for how hardheaded he was, referring to a trait that eventually served in Allison’s favor as a scientist. When not wandering in the woods playing his harmonica, Allison played with a chemistry set in his garage, with encouragement from his father—having lost his mother to lymphoma when he was only 11 years old.

Jim Allison looks at T cells/ Courtesy Malinda Allison

Allison graduated high school at the tender age of 16, heading to the University of Texas in Austin to study biology. It was in college where he learned the importance of perseverance and developed an interest in T cells, which are a central part of the body’s immune response, carrying receptors that have the ability to zero in on a diseased cell and vanquish it. As Michael Curran, Assistant Professor at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, says in the film, “[Allison] was the first one to actually purify the molecule by which T cells recognize everything.”

In 1974, Allison moved to San Diego to learn more about the immune system at Scripps. That’s when he met Willie Nelson and brought him to a local dive bar to play live, developing a friendship with him that led to Allison occasionally playing harmonica in Nelson’s band.

Willie Nelson's Buddy Won A Nobel Prize For Developing A Cancer Drug
Willie Nelson and Jim Allison in concert/ C3 Presents

Tyler Jacks, director of the Koch Institute for Cancer Research at MIT, says in the film, “Part of Jim’s success is that he’s an iconoclast. He doesn’t care. He doesn’t care that he’s not following convention. He’s following his own thoughts, his own motivations. He’s willing to do it in the face of his colleagues not necessarily believing him.”

Meanwhile, Allison successfully spoke against a Texas bill opposing the teaching of evolution in public schools and was offered a full professorship at Berkeley. He theorized that cancer cells highjack CTLA-4 protein receptors and trick T cells into stopping them from attacking tumors. The theory led to Allison developing his drug, Ipilimumab, or “Ipi,” as it came to be known. But watching the film, one question immediately comes to mind: Was it more difficult to actually develop the drug or to get it to people?

“I think getting it to people,” Allison tells High Times. “There was a lot of well-deserved skepticism. Nonetheless, at a certain point, that became irritating. I can argue the points of the science. If somebody says, ‘Here’s another explanation for what you’re telling me,’ I can buy that. What I can’t accept is somebody saying, ‘It’ll never work, just because.’ That just, to me, is unacceptable. And I went through a couple of years of that.”

Willie Nelson's Buddy Won A Nobel Prize For Developing A Cancer Drug
Jim Allison winning the Nobel Prize in 2018/ Nobel Media AB

Allison says that many people in the scientific community had the idea that “immunologists were just a bunch of voodoo agents selling snake oil,” which raises another question: Can Allison identify with cannabis researchers who are struggling to fight longstanding stigma, not to mention prohibitive laws against marijuana?

“Yeah, in some ways I can,” he says. “I mean, these are, in a lot of ways, difficult times to live in, with people thinking everybody’s entitled to their own facts. But you’re not. Facts are facts and data is data. I would just tell people, develop the data. The answer’s in the data. Having said that, I will add that you can look at it a number of different ways. Once you’ve got the data, take a step back and say, ‘OK, well, what does this tell me? Because my experiment may be telling me something else. That data that popped out may be telling me something about a question I didn’t even ask here.’ And the only way to find that out is just to look at it and think about it and view it as sort of a crystal. You hold it up to the light and look at it—how it refracts, how it changes as you look at it. Just keep an open mind and don’t just get limited to the narrow channels that most of us are trained to go down.”

Jim Allison: Breakthrough is in theaters September 27.

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Knotweed Extract: A Natural Pesticide

With so many chemical and “biological” pesticides, you might ask if there is anything more natural available? During this series, there has been one more addition. It’s an extract of a plant related to the Japanese invasive species – Knotweed. This knotweed extract uses terpenes, but mostly natural phenols, to repel pests. That is unless […]

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