The Emerald Conference: 7th Annual Interdisciplinary Cannabis Science Event – Ticket Discounts Available!

The Emerald Conference (7th annual) is the longest running interdisciplinary cannabis science event, and the place to be for cultivators, extractors, physicians, product manufacturers, and anyone else interested in learning more about all the most important research going on behind the scenes of this multi-billion-dollar industry.  

Science and research are the backbone of the legal cannabis industry, especially in the medical sector. Without cannabis science, not only would we stay lagging on best practices in cultivation, production, and safety standards; but much of the western world would be still in the dark, largely unaware of the therapeutic potential of cannabis.  

For a 10% discount on tickets, make sure to subscribe to The THC Weekly Newsletter, your top source for industry news, all the latest information, and exclusive deals on flowers, vapes, edibles, and other products.  


Over the years, The Emerald Conference has become a who’s-who event of decision-makers in many cannabis industry niches including extraction methodology, analytical testing, research and development, formulations and blends, and clinical research.  

Aside from the connections to be made, the wealth of knowledge and expertise at this event is unmatched. In addition to some incredibly educational presentations and sessions, event curators make sure to provide plenty of time for open dialogue, so attendees can discuss the topics in depth.  

The goal is to “overcome black-market paranoia” through irrefutable scientific data and education of the masses. And the best way to do this is by bringing as many from the scientific community as possible to put things into perspective.  

According to David Dawson, Ph.D. Senior Scientist at Via Innovations, “The Emerald Conference is integral to this process, as its high standards for peer-reviewed work and desire for open collaboration amongst participants sets it apart from the vast majority of cannabis conferences.” 

This year’s conference 

This event is more tight-knit than other conferences, so don’t expect a turnout in the tens of thousands like MJ Biz Con. In my opinion, the low-key environment makes it considerably easier to stay focused. Plus, it’s better for meeting people, learning, and making those lasting industry connections.  

Hundreds of people from around the world are expected to attend. During the event, there will be more than 20 speakers, 25 presentations, and 50 exhibitors and sponsors. Furthermore, there will be 3 scheduled networking events, a welcome reception, and evening reception, and a “mimosa & Bloody Mary bar break”.   

The Emerald Conference will take place from February 27 – March 1, 2022, at San Diego Loews Coronado Bay Resort in San Diego, California.  

For a 10% discount on your tickets, subscribe to The THC Weekly Newsletter for a coupon code! 

The main areas of focus at this year’s event will be pre-clinical/clinical research, cultivation and alternative strategies, extraction and separation, formulation and fill/finish, and analytical testing solutions. 

MJ Biz acquisition  

In January 2020, Marijuana Business Daily purchased Emerald Conference from Emerald Scientific, who established the first event in 2015. The deal highlights the growing importance of legitimate research in the industry, as it continues.  

“When looking at where cannabis is going, we identified science as a pillar of the industry’s future,” says Chris Walsh, CEO and president of MJBizDaily. “With the legalization of hemp and inevitable changes to federal marijuana laws in the coming years, the amount of scientific research is going to balloon – as will the needs of the scientific and business communities. 

MJ Biz Daily has been partnering with Emerald to put on this conference ever since its second year running, and this partnership is what led to the eventual acquisition years later. MJ Biz is known for putting on excellent events, and the merger has proven to be beneficial for everyone involved. 

Get your tickets now! 

If you’re an industry stakeholder or another interested party that would like to learn more about cannabis science, The Emerald Conference is an event you don’t want to miss.  

Remember to subscribe to The THC Weekly Newsletter for a 10% percent discount on your tickets to The Emerald Conference – February 27th to March 1st, see you there! 


Hello to everyone..! Thanks for dropping by CBDtesters.co, the #1 internet source for cannabis and psychedelics-related news, offering up current and relevant stories from the industry today. Join us daily to stay on top of the fast-paced universe of legal drugs and industrial hemp, and remember to sign up for The THC Weekly Newsletterso you never miss a single thing. 

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Cannabis Scams To Watch For and Tips To Stay Protected

The cannabis industry is seeing more and more demographics than ever. Those with ailments or conditions, and the elderly are turning to cannabis more frequently. These certain demographics, especially those who are new to the cannabis scene can easily be targeted for scams. That is not to say those who are well versed in their […]

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Brand Spotlight: 710 LABS

Producing profoundly good concentrates that are promoted with fun, engaging branding is the telltale mark of having made it in the cannabis industry. But behind that forward-facing magic is another important component at play that needs to be considered: company culture. For 710 Labs, exceptional products and the best vibes go hand-in-hand.

“It’s important to us that we hire people that really want to be at 710 and know who we are and what we stand for,” said 710’s CEO and Founder Brad Melshenker. “I think that’s been our philosophy from the start; we want people that want to learn, want to grow with the company and want to be there and not just clock in for a paycheck. It takes time to build that culture and find those people.”

Coming into the company from humble beginnings, Melshenker was determined to do something with cannabis, even if he admittedly got off to a rocky start.

Courtesy of 710 Labs

“I connected with cannabis at 16 years old and never looked back,” he explains. “Twenty-three years later, I still love this plant more and more each day. I sold my first eighth of what we called ‘Kind Bud’ when I was 16 years old, so that I could smoke for free. Fast-forward to 2005 when I moved out to LA to get into the fashion industry; that’s when I began to learn the ins and outs of the Prop. 215 model and the business side of the industry. I thought if I could take what I did for the previous eight years while in college and afterwards and do it legally, it would be a dream come true.

“I was acting as a broker between some of the top growers and the best dispensaries in the state, soaking in both worlds as much as I could. Once Obama took office, and Eric Holder announced he was going to leave it to the states to regulate, I knew it was a sign to leave the fashion industry and go all-in. I raised friends and family money in 2008 and built my first grow house in Encino, California. That was a total failure, with me using LEDs before LED technology was sufficient to grow cannabis indoors. But, like all mistakes that are really the path to success, that failure led to the next chapter of our moving to Colorado, where you could be a for-profit LLc as opposed to California, where you had to hide behind the non-profit model to be in compliance at the time.”

With headquarters in both Colorado and California, it’s important to Melshenker that each employee, no matter how recently hired, feels a personal connection to the brand and wants to grow with the company. In an industry that sometimes puts profits over people, this is huge.

“I want to make sure that I build a relationship with everybody in the company; that’s really important to me,” Melshenker said. “I want to get to know them; I want them to understand this is, in a sense, a family. I think it’s important to grow that way with people that you care about and are invested in the company and its success and each other.”

710 Labs
Courtesy of 710 Labs

With an early interest in cannabis paired with an entrepreneurial spirit, Melshenker knew he was destined to work with cannabis, but he had aspirations beyond small-time selling and smoking. Once he realized that some states were going to start legalizing the plant, he got into growing and then extraction, and the rest is history.

“Our commitment is to only sell products that 1 would consume,” Melshenker said about the pride and care that goes into 710’s offerings. “Quality over everything is our ethos. Even over making money. And I know every company says that, but we live it. First-rate hash over self-interest is the formula. We throw batches out in the trash if they don’t meet the quality-control standards, literally. There is a lot of creative branding and packaging out there, a lot of mid-grade product, but I learned early in my career [that] high-quality product always sells the fastest and breeds loyalty. Our fans know they can count on us for consistency as well.”

710 Labs
710 Labs

Known for unique products like water hash and Noodle Doinks (a.k.a. hand-rolled joints), 710 Labs has set itself apart from others in the concentrates industry and stands out from the crowd due to the consistent quality of its offerings.

“Quality over everything is our ethos. Even over making money. And I know every company says that, but we live it.” —Brad Melshenker

“This is the product I am currently most proud of,” said Melshenker of 710 Labs’ pre-rolls. “There wasn’t a pre-roll on the market in either California or Colorado that I would want to go buy. I’m not the best joint-roller in the world, although it is meditative for me. I wanted to develop the ultimate joint with the highest-quality flower inside it. No smalls, no trim, no shake, no ground-up, powdery, dry nugs.

“I wanted to develop something that my weed-snob mind would buy. We cut off excess paper for the perfect bud-to-paper ratio. We added in the gluten-free rotini noodle as the crutch/ filter for airflow and stability, and boom, our Noodle Doinks arrived on the market, and we can’t keep them on shelves. Tensecond Tom, who runs this department and helped set up the process since it’s very laborious, is credited for making my vision become a reality in terms of producing these at scale.”

In addition to the company’s focus on creating some of the best products out there, the 710 crew also has an eye on social equity. Specifically, with a location in Oakland, they try to make sure that the underserved community has access to resources.

“We embrace social-equity programs, as we understand and empathize with the injustice that has occurred due to the government’s previous War on Drugs,” Melshenker said. “Specifically in the city of Oakland, where our California facility is, we have two social-equity partners in two of our cannabis licenses, and, in addition, our company also supports the Anti-Recidivism Coalition, which helps find jobs and offers community and support for formerly incarcerated individuals.”

710 Labs has also worked with a transitional program for foster youth to help them get real-world work experience. The company has interviewed and hired some folks from this program who have gone on to be huge assets to the team. Unlike other brands that only talk the talk, 710 Labs makes sure to walk the walk when it comes to actual inclusion.

Shutterstock

In terms of what’s coming up next for the brand, Melshenker has lots of exciting plans in the works. “We have many announcements in terms of new product lines, like our Rosin Pods, which are dropping in a few months, as well as our Persy Doinks (three grams of flower, one gram of hash rosin),” he said. “Also, we are adding new flavors to our genetic library from the extensive pheno hunting we do for new cultivars.”

Finally, consumers can anticipate future collaborations that have leading creators partnering with 710 Labs. “We will continue to release limited-edition artist drops and collabs, similar to our notable ones with Richard Prince, Camp High and Joe Roberts (LSD World Peace),” Melshenker shared. “I’m very excited about our upcoming collabs with the Elder Statesman and our new line called itsPurpL with Jaleel White that was recently launched. Finally, our seed company, Green Beans, will hit the market in 2022. We are definitely in expansion mode on all fronts, including new states and markets.”

For more information, visit 710labs.com.

Read this story originally published in High Times August 2021 Issue in our archive.

The post Brand Spotlight: 710 LABS appeared first on High Times.

Don’t Get Ripped Off with a Fake Medical Cannabis Card 

The concept of getting a medical cannabis card seems like a fairly straight-forward process for the most part; you contact a physician or licensed medical cannabis doctor in your area, schedule an appointment, and once approved, you receive some type of documentation that allows you to buy medical cannabis. As simple as that should be, a growing number of unscrupulous doctors (or some cases, fake doctors altogether) are taking advantage of consumers and charging hundreds of dollars for counterfeit, invalid, or otherwise unusable medical cannabis recommendations.  

As much as we all love cannabis and wholeheartedly support the legal industry, no one can deny that there can be some shady dealings going on in the shadows. But such is the case in any multi-billion-dollar industry, unfortunately. As a consumer in today’s world, it is very important to do your due diligence before trusting a company and buying a product, and that applies when getting a medical cannabis card as well. For more articles like this one and exclusive deals on legal THC products, make sure to subscribe to The THC Weekly Newsletter. Also save big on HHC-O, Delta 8Delta 9 THCDelta-10 THCTHCOTHCVTHCP HHC products by checking out our “Best-of” lists!


Getting a medical cannabis card  

A medical cannabis card (or medical cannabis recommendation, as they’re often referred to), are state-issued identification documents that confirm the person carrying them has a medical condition that enables them to legally purchase, possess, and use cannabis. As regulations change and medical markets explode, the idea of paying for a medical card may seem obsolete, but there are some benefits carrying one still.  

Take California, for instance, where cannabis is in fact completely legal, but as a recreational customer, you’re stuck paying up to 45% in recreational, cultivation, excise, and local taxes. Plus, your purchases are limited to one ounce of flower and eight grams of concentrate. Patients with a doctor’s recommendation can possess up to 8 ounces, or 226.8 grams, of dried cannabis or concentrates, and they’re exempt from paying all the extra taxes.  

The qualifying conditions vary from state to state, and can also be at the discretion of the recommending physician. Ordinarily, the card will be valid for up to 12 months, at which point you will need to schedule a follow-up appointment for another evaluation. It used to be that you had to do a lot of searching and often, quite a bit of driving, to find a “marijuana doctor” who was willing to write these recommendations, but now, everything can be done remotely.  

The process for getting a medical cannabis card can vary a bit from state to state, but overall, it’s pretty similar across the board. You can apply your through state’s medical cannabis registry and try find a physician who is willing to write you a recommendation, which can be tricky since most doctors are prohibited from prescribing or even suggesting cannabis. Or, you could pay a third-party company to do it for you. The latter can be equally complicated, because, although some companies are legit, professional, and affordable, others will issue a fake or invalid medical card at exorbitant prices.  

Counterfeits running rampant  

Missouri’s medical marijuana program announced late Friday that it launched an investigation after it determined that patient medical marijuana cards have been issued to applicants whose doctor paperwork was sent in with an unauthorized signature.  

“It was a person/people impersonating a doctor,” Department of Health and Senior Services spokesperson Lisa Cox told the News-Leader in a text message. She said some 600 patients were affected, and that the department could not comment on who was being impersonated. 

Alex Griffith, a 30-year-old retired military veteran who lives in Delhi Township, recently paid $220 for a doctor’s recommendation he hoped would allow him to use marijuana to treat his PTSD. “Marijuana helps me control my condition way better than Prozac and all those other pills doctors want to give you,” said Griffith, who suffers from bouts of depression and suicidal thoughts.  

Pills or cannabis?

A recommendation letter from a doctor working for the Ohio Cannabis Connection, verifying the client is eligible to be treated with medical marijuana. The letter is needed to apply for a medical marijuana patient ID, but the letter alone can’t be used to purchase marijuana for a retail dispensary. The former Marine infantryman who served in Afghanistan from 2011 to 2012 said he wants to be “first in line” when the 56 retail dispensaries licensed to sell medical marijuana in Ohio begin opening their doors in the coming months.  

But the one-page recommendation letter he got from Dr. Trent Austin, an emergency medicine doctor in Batesville, Ind., who’s also licensed in Ohio, won’t do him much good. In Ohio, the recommendation does not stand alone, and patients need to submit their information and register with the Ohio Board of Pharmacy. 

“At some level, they’re fooling people into believing they have something that they don’t,” said Dr. William Sawyer, a Sharonville family physician and one of about 300 doctors certified by the state to recommend medical marijuana, referring to the confusion between a recommendation letters and actual ID cards in some states. “It’s unfortunate that that’s happening because it creates problems for us who are doing it correctly.” 

How to avoid getting ripped off  

Below are some ways to know if your medical marijuana doctor is legit;  

Use a Registry  

While this may not apply in all the states, some cannabis-legal states have an organized medical marijuana card issuance. For instance, Florida has a real-time database that updates and keeps track of all certified marijuana doctors authorized by the state to approve applications for any patient looking for an MMJ card online.  

Referrals  

If you have no clue where to get a marijuana doctor or medical marijuana card near me, you can start by asking for referrals from your close contacts. As mentioned, the buzzing medical marijuana use attracted many industry players, including self-proclaimed doctors. With many doctors out there, it becomes hard to differentiate legitimate from fake doctors. Fortunately, you can get recommendations from your friends, relatives, or family members. You can also ask for referrals and read what other people think about your preferred doctor from the Marijuanadoctors.com review.  

Price  

The cost of the marijuana doctor is another essential guiding factor. Essentially, any physician who charges less than $50 may not be offering legitimate services. Your best bet is to compare rates from different clinics. The charges of all clinics should be within a given range. If one clinic’s charges are extremely low, chances are you can get a fake card. On the other hand, if the costs are way up, you might be exploited to get a card that should cost less. 

Make sure your doctor is legit

Final thoughts  

Hello to everyone..! Thanks for dropping by CBDtesters.co, the #1 internet source for cannabis and psychedelics-related news, offering up current and relevant stories from the industry today. Join us daily to stay on top of the fast-paced universe of legal drugs and industrial hemp, and remember to sign up for The THC Weekly Newsletterso you never miss a single thing. 

Disclaimer: Hi, I’m a researcher and writer. I’m not a doctor, lawyer, or businessperson. All information in my articles is sourced and referenced, and all opinions stated are mine. I am not giving anyone advice, and though I am more than happy to discuss topics, should someone have a further question or concern, they should seek guidance from a relevant professional.

The post Don’t Get Ripped Off with a Fake Medical Cannabis Card  appeared first on CBD Testers.

2022 Predictions for the Delta-8 THC Industry

The new year is upon us, and that means a restart to the business year, and all new things to look forward to. What will happen this year? Sure hard to say at the moment, but every new year comes with new stories of legalizations, court cases, innovative products, events, and medical findings. What about our newly discovered cannabinoids market? Here are some 2022 predictions for delta-8 THC and the rest of the lot.

My 2022 prediction for delta-8 THC is that the market will survive the year just fine. If you’re looking to try out delta-8 THC and the rest of the cannabinoids, you can do so, even outside of legal markets. In fact, since these products exist outside of regulation, you can buy them online as well. We’ve got great offers for the new year, so check out our deals to find your perfect product. Remember to subscribe to The THC Weekly Newsletter all the latest news and industry stories, as well as exclusive deals on flowers, vapes, edibles, and other products. Also save big on Delta 8Delta 9 THCDelta-10 THCTHCOTHCVTHCP & HHC products by checking out our “Best-of” lists!


What is delta-8 THC and the cannabinoids market?

If we’re getting into 2022 predictions for delta-8 THC, best to know what we’re talking about first. Delta-8 THC is a naturally occurring isomer of delta-9 THC, which means they have the same chemical formula, but a different chemical structure. They are double bond stereoisomers since they vary only in the placement of a double bond.

While the exact way that delta-8 THC shows up naturally is still only theorized, its expected that delta-8 is a less-occurring degradant of delta-9, making up a tiny percentage, which doesn’t become CBN (the main degradant). Delta-8 is more stable than delta-9, having already oxidized, which gives it a longer shelf-life. Delta-8 occurs only in tiny amounts, and though it does show up on its own, it doesn’t in big enough quantities for product production. Thus, to be used in products, delta-8 must be made from delta-9 THC or from CBD, both of which require some amount of synthetic processing.

Perhaps none of this would matter, but delta-8, with its double bond on the eighth carbon atom, seems to have slightly different benefits from delta-9, which can make it preferable to some users. For example, it’s said that delta-8 causes less anxiety than delta-9, which is great for users who have an issue with this. It’s also said that it causes a more clear-headed high, which is slightly less intense than a delta-9 high, and without the couch-locking of standard weed. Medical patients especially, who want treatment without a cloudy head, may find delta-8 a better option.

cannabinoids

You’ll notice, when I mentioned 2022 predictions for delta-8 THC, that I included the rest of the cannabinoid offerings. Along with delta-8 THC, a range of other synthetically produced cannabinoids have been making it to the unregulated cannabis market.  This includes THCV, CBN, THC-O-A, HHC, and a bunch of others with varying letters to denote their similar-to-THC chemical makeup.

Why are we talking about delta-8 and other cannabinoids?

Also before getting into 2022 predictions for delta-8 THC, its best to know why we’re talking about it, since the whole reason we’re talking about it, can be a reason why the current situation might change. Delta-8 THC is produced under the misconception of legality due to the 2018 US Farm Bill, a misconception that seems to be spurred along by the industry itself, likely in an attempt to continue to sell products without regulation.

The 2018 US Farm Bill legalized the production of industrial hemp only, by simply changing the definition of ‘hemp’ in order to separate it from the rest of cannabis. ‘Hemp’ now refers to lower-THC cannabis, while ‘marijuana’ refers to higher-THC cannabis. Both the US and Europe make the cutoff at .3% THC by dry weight as the divider.

This new definition for hemp, which has led to this mass confusion in the press (but which is soundly understood by any legal professional), is: “The plant Cannabis sativa L. and any part of the plant, whether growing or not, including the plant’s seeds, and all the plant’s derivatives, extracts, cannabinoids, isomers, acids, salts, and salts of isomers, whether growing or not, with a delta-9 tetrahydrocannabinol concentration of not more than 0.3 percent on a dry weight basis.”

The 2018 Farm Bill moved regulation of hemp from the FDA to the USDA, but retained FDA oversight for medicines, nutritional supplements, foods, and beverages, meaning anytime a compound is sold for any of these purposes, it requires a pass through the FDA. As such, even CBD in supplements and food products, is not legal, let alone delta-8 and the rest of the cannabinoid crew.

This is partly because synthetics weren’t legalized by the Farm Bill either, meaning once a synthetic process is used to create a compound, it no longer fits under the definition of hemp. Synthetics of Schedule I substances (like delta-9) are also considered Schedule I, which means all these compounds are illegal under the Federal Analogue Act.

delta-8 laws

2022 predictions delta-8 THC

Now that the legal situation is understood, here are my general 2022 predictions for delta-8 THC, and rest of the cannabinoid market.

  • Delta-8 will continue on. As a part of the no-one-will-do-anything-about-it loophole, delta-8 enjoys being in a position where there doesn’t seem to be an ability to go after it by the federal government. And if there is an ability, but the federal government is choosing not to at the moment, I don’t think anything will explicitly happen in 2022 that will change this situation. Best to keep an eye on the news to ensure no sweeping legal updates, or increased law enforcement in this area.
  • Delta-8 will not threaten the standard cannabis industry. Though delta-8 created a lot of press stories about the possibility of threatening the regular weed market earlier on, this seems like media overkill on the wrong point. Truth is, weed is a standard, and its existed for thousands of years in its own market that never required synthetics to be made. People want the regular thing, and the regular thing is not delta-8 THC. Plus, regular cannabis can be grown by a user, meaning its far more accessible, and easier to get a clean product.
  • Delta-8 sales might go down by year’s end. Though I expect it to continue on just fine, my 2022 prediction for delta-8 is that by year’s end this fad will be fading out. I don’t think it has to do with illegalization either, simply with the fact that temporary fads are temporary fads. Delta-8 is up against regular cannabis, and its hard to imagine such a seismic shift in a stable industry.
  • The delta-8 market will get increasingly dirty, and this says something as it already operates as a pretty dirty industry. How dirty? These companies aren’t being regulated which means they can put anything they want in their products, or use any processing techniques desirable. In fact, the industry is so dirty, that it developed its own black-market testing to give the illusion that testing is going on, when in reality this has been exposed as a sham. With a mad dash to get any income from it, I expect companies will get seedier and seedier in their attempts to seem like the good guy in a sea of criminals.
  • More states will create legislation specifically banning this market. Technically this is overkill since no state allows synthetics in their markets legally. Even so, state after state has been setting specific legislation, possibly at the behest of the US government, which doesn’t appreciate untaxed items being sold. I expect more will follow this pattern in 2022.
  • Little to no regulation will be made. The previous point goes along with this point. While states will likely be making legislation to ban the market, this will be done instead of regulating it to ensure no bad chemicals or processing are used. Since these products are being sold outside of regulation, it would make way more sense to simply regulate them, and bring them to the above board market. The lack of regulation hints at the federal government looking to simply wait out the fad (or to wait for a tank out and then pharma/corporate buyout of the current industry, which it might be more excited to police).
  • More fear stories will come out. Whether about people getting sick from adulterants put in, or stories of faked lab results, I expect more and more news on the dangers of delta-8 and the other cannabinoids, will fill the press. These stories will not be centered around the dangers of the compounds, but the dangers of what can happen to them in an unregulated market. They won’t be framed as such though, but rather they’ll be framed to give the story that the compounds themselves are dangerous.
no additives
  • I think the rest of the cannabinoid market will start to peter out. Delta-8 is one thing, but when a new compound comes out everyday, there’s no way consumers can keep up, or care. THCP, THCVA, CBDVA…I mean, come on, it starts to look shady, and untrustworthy. And it’s not very smart. Focusing on a couple cannabinoids might have worked, but inundating the masses with compound after compound, when these compounds aren’t even understood in the world of science, is a great way to scare people off them entirely.
  • CBD might finally get some legalization. CBD is essentially just as illegal as the other compounds mentioned, not because its synthetic, but because its already an active ingredient in a pharmaceutical medication, and in the US, that makes it a no-no for use in supplements or food products. There has been a push to get some level of legalization for CBD, and I think 2022 might see some progress in this vein, particularly because the UN already gave CBD a pass as a medicine. It should be remembered that what qualifies as a ‘medicine’ in one place, can qualify as a ‘supplement’ in another.
  • The last 2022 prediction I’ll make for delta-8 THC and the cannabinoids market, is that I think people will realize more during this year that these products can’t change their lives, if they aren’t going to make changes outside of them. With any fad that comes without the lasting power to stay, once people realize the answer isn’t as easy as they think, they generally decide to try something else instead. Does this mean people will start making bigger changes to the rest of their lives? Well, maybe not, but I expect they’ll start looking for a new easy answer.

Conclusion

Maybe I’m right on some of these points, and maybe I’m wrong. When it comes to 2022 predictions for delta-8 THC, we can all have our own, but in the end, we just have to wait and see what happens.

Hello and welcome… Thank you for stopping by CBDtesters.co, your #1 web source for the most relevant and interesting cannabis and psychedelics-related news going on globally. Check us out daily to stay in-the-know on the fast-moving world of legal drugs and industrial hemp, and sign up for The THC Weekly Newsletter, so you’re first to get every news story.

DisclaimerHi, I’m a researcher and writer. I’m not a doctor, lawyer, or businessperson. All information in my articles is sourced and referenced, and all opinions stated are mine. I am not giving anyone advice, and though I am more than happy to discuss topics, should someone have a further question or concern, they should seek guidance from a relevant professional.

The post 2022 Predictions for the Delta-8 THC Industry appeared first on CBD Testers.

Cannabis Compounds Can Help Prevent COVID-19, but Not in the Way You Might Expect

Social media has been abuzz this week with news of a recently published laboratory study that found compounds in cannabis had the potential to stop COVID-19 from entering human cells. So does getting high increase immunity against COVID-19, or is it all too good to be true? 

The idea of using cannabis compounds to prevent or treat COVID-19 is exciting, but not unheard of. So many plants have antiviral properties, nature is essentially a giant, partially untapped medicine cabinet. To learn more about natural compounds, and for exclusive deals on all the trending cannabinoid products, remember to subscribe to The THC Weekly Newsletter. Also save big on Delta 8Delta 9 THCDelta-10 THCTHCOTHCVTHCP & HHC products by checking out our “Best-of” lists!


So, does smoking weed really prevent coronavirus? 

Short answer: no. I’ve been getting this question all week and to clarify, no, smoking cannabis will not prevent or treat COVID-19, as far as we know anyway. But a combination of terpenes along with two minor cannabinoids found in the raw plant matter can help – CBDA and CBGA.  

There are two studies in question that have been getting a lot of attention lately. First, we’ll take a look at the most recent, which was published on January 10, 2022, in the Journal of Natural Products. The study was conducted by researchers at Oregon State University, using a chemical screening technique invented on campus. They found that Cannabidiolic acid (CBDA) and Cannabigerolic acid (CBGA) bound to coronavirus spike proteins and were able to inhibit the virus’s ability to enter healthy cells, at least in a petri dish.  

“These cannabinoid acids are abundant in hemp and in many hemp extracts,” says Richard van Breemen, study lead and researcher with Oregon State’s Global Hemp Innovation Center, College of Pharmacy, and Linus Pauling Institute. “They are not controlled substances like THC, the psychoactive ingredient in marijuana, and have a good safety profile in humans. And our research showed the hemp compounds were equally effective against variants of SARS-CoV-2, including variant B.1.1.7, which was first detected in the United Kingdom, and variant B.1.351, first detected in South Africa.” 

The second study, titled “In Vitro Evaluation of the Activity of Terpenes and Cannabidiol against Human Coronavirus E229,” was published by the peer-reviewed journal Life on March 29, 2021. The research studied the antiviral action of a proprietary formulation of terpenes. The blend, known as NT-VRL, is a combination of 30 terpenes including beta-caryophyllene, eucalyptol and citral developed by cannabis technology company Eybna. 

Antiviral plants, nature’s medicine cabinet

Medicinal plants have been used for thousands of years to treat various ailments; it’s how the human race has survived centuries-worth of plagues, pandemics, and other outbreaks of disease. Interestingly, many animals such as deer, bear, elk, apes, some birds, lizards, and spiders, are all known to self-medicate with several local plants as well.  

As far detached as we are from natural treatments, it’s estimated that even in modern western medicine, up to 25% of commonly used prescription and OTC medications contain compounds isolated from plants, or synthetic versions of these compounds. Take Marinol, for instance, a prescription anti-nausea medicine contains synthetic THC.

Healing plants work synergistically with the body’s natural capabilities, and they also boost the immune system making it less likely to get sick again in the future. Additionally, natural products typically work without destroying important cells and compounds that already exist in the body. Plant compounds can treat and prevent many different conditions including inflammation, bacterial infections, nausea, diarrhea, and viral infections.  

A lot of plant extracts and isolated compounds possess broad-spectrum antiviral activity. Commonly used antiviral plants include: oregano, sage, basil, fennel, garlic, lemon balm (not lemon, but rather a lemon-scented plant that comes from the mint family), peppermint, rosemary, echinacea, sambucus, licorice, astragalus, ginger, ginseng, and dandelion. 

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What are cannabinoid acids? 

Simply explained, cannabinoid acids are precursors to the cannabinoids we all know and love, like THC and CBD. They are found on the stems, leaves and flowers of certain strains of raw cannabis before any type of heat application or processing takes place. Decarboxylation, also referred to as “decarbing” for short, is the process of using heat (and sometimes light and oxygen exposure) to convert cannabinoids from their natural acidic state to their ‘activated’ form. By heating raw cannabinoids, a chemical reaction takes place that removes the carboxyl acid group and releases CO2.  

Cannabis doesn’t create cannabinoids in the way we are familiar with them. Instead, it synthesizes several different cannabinoid acids; eight that we know of, to be specific. In order to become cannabinoids, these acids must be activated – or decarboxylated – using heat, light, and oxygen exposure. Above we briefly mentioned THCA and CBDA, but let’s quickly go over all of the known cannabinoid acids: 

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  • CBGA (Cannabigerolic acid, becomes cannabigerol) 
  • THCA (Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid, becomes tetrahydrocannabinol) 
  • CBDA (Cannabidiolic acid, becomes cannabidiol) 
  • CBCA (Cannabichromenenic acid, becomes cannabichromene) 
  • CBGVA (Cannabigerovarinic acid, becomes cannabigerovarin) 
  • THCVA (Tetrahydrocanabivarinic acid, becomes tetrahydrocannabivarin) 
  • CBDVA (Cannabidivarinic acid, becomes cannabidivarin) 
  • CBCVA (Cannabichromevarinic acid, becomes cannabichromevarin) 

CBGA, THCA, CBDA, and CBCA are the most abundant cannabinoid acids. All of the plant’s compounds start as CBGA and various enzymes eventually convert it into the other three. In addition to these major acids, there are another four corresponding “V” compounds with slightly shorter chemical structures, and they are: CBGVA, THCVA, CBDVA, and CBCVA. 

Cannabinoid acids do not have any psychoactive effects, however, they do have numerous medical benefits. In the few studies that have emerged, cannabinoid acids were found to have antibacterial, antifungal, and insecticidal properties. In nature, their function is to defend the plant, so it makes sense that they work similarly in humans. 

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More about terpenes 

Terpenes are a very large and diverse class of organic compounds that are produced by a wide variety of plants including herbs, trees, flowers, and fruit. In cannabis, they are secreted by the same glands that produce some of the most prominent cannabinoids including THC and CBD; but their role and effects are vastly different. Terpenes are aromatic plant oils that, when combined with other plant compounds, create a limitless palate of scents and flavors. In nature, terps serve as a defense mechanism by deterring herbivores who are turned away by the smells, and by attracting predators and parasites that attack herbivores. 

Chemically, terpenes are hydrocarbon and they are the major component of rosin, a waxy type of sap that produced and developed throughout the life cycle of the cannabis plant. There are curing processes that can improve the final quality and content of the terpenes, but other factors that impact their development are climate, weather, age and maturation, fertilizers, soil type, and light cycles. 

As far as cannabis goes, terpenes – not classification – are key to differentiating between the effects and flavors of various strains. Some terpenes are relaxing, like those found in lavender, while others are energizing, like the terps abundant in citrus fruit. Some smell fruity, some are piney, and others are musky. The possible variations are endless. So far, over 100 different terpenes have been discovered in cannabis plants alone, and each strain typically has its own unique blend and composition of terps. 

Terpenes have long been known to hold great therapeutic value, and some of the more common ones – like limonene, pinene, and caryophyllene – have been studied more extensively, considering they’re found in many different types of legal plants. More research is needed to determine the extent of their medicinal effects when combined with other cannabis plant compounds. 

Final thoughts on cannabis and COVID-19

To summarize, both of these studies are extremely promising, albeit not very surprising, knowing what we already know about plant compounds. More research needs to be done to see exactly how cannabis-based treatments, cannabinoid acids specifically, can be used to treat or possibly prevent COVID-19. Keep in mind that simply smoking weed will not prevent coronavirus, and if you’re already sick, it could make matters worse by further irritating the throat and lungs. To utilize CBDA and CBGA, you will need to find products that contain these cannabinoids, or eat raw cannabis.

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Hello and Welcome! Thanks for making it to CBDtesters.co, the internet’s preeminent location for the most important and though-provoking cannabis and psychedelics-related news globally. Visit us whenever you can to stay on top of the always-in-flux universe of legal drugs and industrial hemp, and remember to check out The THC Weekly Newsletterto ensure you always know what’s going on.

Disclaimer: Hi, I’m a researcher and writer. I’m not a doctor, lawyer, or businessperson. All information in my articles is sourced and referenced, and all opinions stated are mine. I am not giving anyone advice, and though I am more than happy to discuss topics, should someone have a further question or concern, especially regarding cannabis as part of medicinal regimen or any questions about COVID-19, they should seek guidance from a relevant professional.

The post Cannabis Compounds Can Help Prevent COVID-19, but Not in the Way You Might Expect appeared first on CBD Testers.

Laser Bong Review – The Hitoki Trident V2

If George Jetson smoked weed, his bong might look something like a Hitoki Trident V2; it’s a laser bong, for real. The Hitoki Trident V2 is an all-in-one device that takes the cannabis experience to another level. It’s an investment piece. As a medical user, cannabis is critical for my health, thus, sometimes I need […]

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Brand Spotlight: Moon Made Farms

“I’ve always been somebody who was a minority among minorities, being marginalized and also being attracted to marginalized subcultures. Rock ‘n’ roll is where I found my family, and in cannabis, I found another family.” Inspired by the “female expression of the most powerful plant on Earth,” her words, Tina Gordon of Moon Made Farms carved out a cannabis brand, and a name for herself, in Humboldt County, California. But it hasn’t always been this way.

“I was living in San Francisco for most of my adult life, and during that time, I was living a very underground lifestyle with art, music and playing in bands, releasing records, van touring, that kind of thing, for about 20 years,” Gordon said. “I was in a bunch of different punk and metal bands; I did a mobile soundstage, that kind of thing. And I used to do art shows, photography, video. I really dedicated myself to having a full, creative life, to live lean, and to live life to the fullest.”

However, after two decades living that lifestyle, things began to transition. After going through a band break-up and a career shift, she was looking for where to go next. Suddenly, Gordon found herself spending more and more time in Humboldt County instead of the Bay Area, first filming a documentary, then even dating someone in the area and realizing she wanted to spend all of her time there. She also fell in love with growing the cannabis plant, something she never would have tried in her previous life.

“Moon Made Farms acknowledges the feminine in this plant, the moon being a symbol of femininity. The moon has a regular schedule with subtle changes every, single night. So, sun-grown isn’t just about the sun; it’s about the moon and the night cycle as well.”

“I didn’t even have houseplants in San Francisco,” she admitted. “I was really urban. And then when I went through my first season in Humboldt, and I saw this plant grow from seed to full expression, I was completely captivated, and it shifted my awareness to the natural world and how incredible it is. The sensory experience of growing this plant changed my life.”

As she began listening to the earth and the plants she was growing, she started to realize how sacred the relationship between cannabis and grower truly is. Seeing how cannabis thrives when given rain-caught water, fresh air, full sunlight and all the other natural elements that can be granted through outdoor growing in the Emerald Triangle, Gordon knew she had a new obsession. Now, instead of making music and art, she’s all about growing the juiciest, most gorgeous buds. But she never left the social justice element behind.

Gordon started learning permaculture regenerative techniques and working them into her growing to develop more sustainable practices around producing cannabis. As an advocate for outdoor growing, she is always trying to learn more. And as a social justice advocate, she always tries to pull in queer folks, women and other marginalized people to work on her farm.

Photo Credit: Matthew Brightman

“I’ve always been somebody who was a minority among minorities, being marginalized and also being attracted to marginalized subcultures,” Gordon said. “Rock ‘n’ roll is where I found my family, and in cannabis, I found another family. And when something changes your life as much as cannabis, there is a responsibility to pay it forward, a responsibility to do activism work and social justice work and to help educate people about the true value of this plant.

Through education, she wants to make sure that the focus is on sun-grown and natural cannabis, a personal passion.

“Misconceptions about outdoor-grown flower are based on the industry standard,” she said.

“That started because of prohibition, when all the outdoor farmers were forced inside, so indoor farming became the industry standard. Now that we’re emerging out of prohibition, it just feels like the plant should go back outside. Now, during that time, some incredible advancements have happened. A lot has happened in the way of genetics and techniques around this plant, but I would love to see this plant go back outside, and for there to be extensive research done on the properties and potential of what this plant has to offer.

Photo Credit: Debra Keith

Now, Moon Made Farms is known on the market for producing quality, sungrown, sustainable cannabis that stands out from the rest, but it wouldn’t have been possible without the hard work and ethos that Gordon puts into her work. She’s also thrilled that she gets to revisit her musician days and sell merch for her farm, and she loves studying the growth cycle of the plant. As for the moon, to her, it’s a celebration of the feminine within the cannabis plant, the dark within the light.

“Moon Made Farms acknowledges the feminine in this plant, the moon being a symbol of femininity. The moon has a regular schedule with subtle changes every, single night. So, sun-grown isn’t just about the sun; it’s about the moon and the night cycle as well. This is a photosensitive plant. It’s sensitive to light. And that quality of light will affect the plant in every way, so one of the most important things about the plant being grown outside is that exposure to the night sky. And so, Moon Made Farms is acknowledging lunar farming techniques, an ancient way of cultivating all plants, as well as the symbol of the feminine that the moon represents.”

Read this story originally published in High Times July 2021 Issue in our archive.

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Exploring Cannabis Culture in Moscow, Russia

Zdravstvuyte and welcome to Moscow, the mysterious, majestic and imposing capital of Russia. Where Vodka is swigged to the cheers of nostravya and hot baths or banya’s are enjoyed by all. A Beautiful city with a wealth of history, but what is the Russian capital’s attitude to cannabis?

Would you be safe smoking a spliff in front of St Peter’s Basilica? In this edition of cannabis culture, we’re jetting off to Moskva to find out. Here at CBD testers, when we talk about cannabis culture we are discussing ‘the way that cannabis can be perceived and treated within a society, city or country.’ This means all aspects of cannabis not just smoking, but also the attitudes and use of cannabinoid oil products and the attitudes towards medical cannabis too. So, wrap up warm, drink down your borscht and welcome to Moscow.

Whether you’re talking about the US, Europe, or anywhere else in the world, cannabis culture can vary significantly. To learn about laws across the globe, make sure to subscribe to The THC Weekly Newsletter, your hub for all things cannabis-related. Also save big on Delta 8Delta 9 THCDelta-10 THCTHCOTHCVTHCP & HHC products by checking out our “Best-of” lists!


Moscow

Moscow is the capital of Russia, located in the far western side of the giant country. First mentioned in 1147, it has grown from a small city located on the river Moskva into the largest city in Europe, by population. Moscow was the capital of the USSR until it fell apart, when it then was declared the capital of the Russian Federation. Throughout history, Moscow has seen battles and sieges, from Napoleon to the Nazis, both falling at the walls of the Kremlin. It is a mega-city, the financial capital of Russia as well as its cultural capital with many theatres, writers and poets hailing from the city. The Bolshoy is one of the largest and most famous ballet theatres in the world and the Moscow Arts theatre was the original home of Checkov’s The Seagull and Uncle Vanya. Let’s take a closer look at some of the must see places to visit in the Russian capital.

Red Square

Located in the centre of Moscow, Red Square is one of the most famous tourist sites in the whole of europe. An imposing public square just outside the dark red walls of the Kremlin, the red square would make any one feel tiny. The name actually comes from the Russian word Krasny, which used to mean beautiful, but later meant red in more modern Russian. The square is home to a whole host of famous sights, including: St Peter’s basilica the candy coloured church with beautiful spires, Lenin’s tomb, where you are still able to visit the preserved body of the founding father of the USSR, and the Russian State historical museum, a fantastic collection of artefacts about the Russian state. 

Pushkin Museum 

The beautiful Pushkin museum is a must see in the city of Moscow. Home to over 700 000 individual pieces of art, there’s almost too much to see in one day. Hundreds of sculptures, beautiful paintings and from across the whole world, it’s one of the best art museums I’ve ever visited.

The Moscow Metro

I know, you’re probably wondering why I’d put a mode of public transport on the top things to see in Moscow, but the metro is in itself a work of art. Each station was individually built to be as grand as possible. Some have works of art, some are painted like the inside of a great ballroom… One thing’s for sure, each one is spectacularly individual.

Cannabis in Moscow

So what is the relationship between the muscovites and cannabis? Well it’s a little tricky, recently the government has been cracking down on drug control and convictions in the city. The laws have become tough, as described below, and it is very tricky to find cannabis in Russia and even dangerous to do so. This tricky relationship with cannabis started with the USSR, who cracked down on cannabis and opium in the 60’s and 70’s to defeat what they called narcomania. These strict laws have lasted into modern Russia and Putin has vocally demonstrated his dislike of drugs and drug culture.

Is It Legal?

To be blunt, no. Russia has very strict drug laws and these extend to cannabis. Russia has one of the highest numbers of people per capita imprisoned for drug possession in europe and this is likely due to the rather draconian laws surrounding drugs, including cannabis.  Cannabis is included on list 1 of narcotic and psychoactive substances, which means it is treated with the strictest level of control. Possession of cannabis in Russia and Moscow would lead to a fine of a few thousand dollars and this is only if you’re caught with an amount of less than 6 grams. A law passed in 2006 meant that any amount below 6 grams was classed as an administrative issue, so dealt with fines, anything above was considered a large amount and could lead to a prison sentence or a large fine of up to 40,000 rubles.

However, if the person caught, willingly hands in the cannabis and then gives up any information that may lead to more drug related arrests, then they may avoid penalties. It is particularly risky for a foreigner to be in possession of cannabis in Russia. Polica may be more likely to ask for a bribe, which may be even higher than the fine. If you don’t pay this, they can threaten to take your passport or fine you. In fact, recently an American student was fined $230 for the possession of cannabis in St Petersburg. What’s more interesting is that the cannabis was medicinal. Medical cannabis as well as cannabinoid oils are illegal in Russia, although there is research going into the benefits of cannabis medically. Also, interestingly medical cannabis was briefly permitted for anyone arriving into Moscow for the 2018 world cup!

Picking up in Moscow

Despite the tough laws, people do still smoke cannabis in Moscow. In fact a recent survey suggested that there were around 8 million drug users in Russia. Picking up drugs in Moscow is not strictly advised, considering the illegality. However, if one was desperately in need of some cannabis, then there are methods. Many reddit groups discuss the best ways to pick up cannabis in Moscow and many advise visiting nightclubs and speaking to younger citizens. Drugs do exist in the city, however they have to be found. Locals will be better to ask than any drug sellers on the street. It is strongly advised not to accept any drugs from someone selling on the streets, firstly because it is impossible to know whether these sellers are police or not and secondly because the quality is likely to be horrendous.

Even when you do find a local to advise you on where to pick up cannabis, the results can be somewhat complicated. I stayed in Moscow for two months and a friend of mine was sent on a rather comical journey to pick up cannabis. A local had advised him to message on a particular facebook site, protected from police view. Someone from this site then messaged him a location (after he’d bank transferred some money). The location was an hour outside of Moscow, in a forest… He had to cycle out into the forest and follow the exact directions to a marker on his map. When there, he found a small baggy, hidden underneath some foliage. We tried it… it was terrible, but the journey, he says, was worth it for the story. 

The Future of Drugs in Moscow

A reform in Russian drug policy doesn’t seem to be on the horizon. In a bleak survey, done in 2014, only 14% of Russians believed that drugs such as Cannabis should be legalised. With a proportion that low, it seems unlikely that the government will make any large scale changes. A quite famous case of an anti corruption journalist called Andrey Golunov, who was arrested for supposed trafficking of cannabis, has stirred some debate about the laws surrounding drugs in Russia.

The journalist claimed that the cannabis found on him had been planted and, indeed, the court agreed. The law, article 228, that allows for arrests to be made for people carrying over 6 grams, has been called under question and there are reports that the government is willing to discuss shortening the quite brutal sentences for non-trafficking related drug possession. Perhaps this, as well as a growing scepticism within youth groups in Russia, could be the start of a slow progression towards legalisation.  

Conclusion

So, perhaps Moscow isn’t exactly the most cannabis friendly city in the world… in fact it may be one of the strictest in Europe, but there is still evidence of some cannabis culture. Within younger generations, in the reddit groups, in the surreptitious packages in forests, cannabis culture is still extant in the beautiful city of Moscow. However, we really don’t recommend actively seeking out cannabis in the Russian capital, at least not just yet, as the law is still very strict and unless you want to pay a hefty fine at least, it may be safer to enjoy the city without our wonderful plant… at least until the Russian’s come to their senses about cannabis. 

Welcome to CBDtesters.co! The internet’s one-stop-shop for the most thought-provoking and important cannabis and psychedelics-related news going on globally. Join us everyday to stay informed on this ever-changing landscape of legal drugs and industrial hemp, and sign up for The THC Weekly Newsletterso you’re always first on getting the important news.

Disclaimer: Hi, I’m a researcher and writer. I’m not a doctor, lawyer, or businessperson. All information in my articles is sourced and referenced, and all opinions stated are mine. I am not giving anyone advise, and though I am more than happy to discuss topics, should someone have a further question or concern, they should seek guidance from a relevant professional.

The post Exploring Cannabis Culture in Moscow, Russia appeared first on CBD Testers.

Look Your Best: The Benefits of Hemp Cosmetics

There are a lot of ways to use the cannabis plant, and a lot of products that can be made. Whether a person wants to smoke flower, vape a concentrate, eat an edible, inhale via a nasal spray, get it through a patch, or rub it all over their skin, each of these methods allows a person to ingest compounds, or use the plant in some way. In the case of cosmetics, the goal isn’t to get high, the goal is to look good. So here are some basics of the benefits of hemp cosmetics.

The benefits of hemp cosmetics are substantial compared to standard petroleum-based cosmetics, and this is good for personal health, and the environment. Cannabis is great in that way, offering tons of positive medical and recreational attributes from smoking up, to getting ready for a night out. Plus, with the new and wide-ranging cannabinoids market, not only can products be bought outside of regulation, but there are tons of new offerings including delta-8 THC, THCV, and HHC among others. Check out all our current deals and find the products perfect for you.


What are hemp cosmetics?

As always, before getting into the benefits of hemp cosmetics, its best to first describe what we’re talking about. Most people probably have a working definition of cosmetics in their head. Nonetheless, for anyone that needs a formal definition, cosmetics are “relating to, or making for beauty especially of the complexion.” With a second definition defining that this is “done or made for the sake of appearance.”

In other words, makeup, and skin care items. Whether you’re moisturizing your skin to get that awesome healthy glow, rubbing rouge on your cheeks, covering up those blemishes, or putting thickening cream in your hair, these are all examples of products used to improve appearance, and they all fit under the title of ‘cosmetics’.

Cosmetics are far and away mainly female bought items. In very few societies today is it standard for men to wear makeup, though this certainly doesn’t preclude them from doing so. Especially when it comes to things like covering blemishes, or hair care (including shaving), men do take part in the market as well.

hemp cosmetics

Hemp cosmetics are cosmetics that incorporate hemp into their ingredients list, many using hemp oil as the base for the product. With tons of medical properties, there are many benefits to the user for using of hemp cosmetics. This isn’t simply because hemp can offer so much, but also as an alternative to the often-not-safe chemicals used in standard cosmetics today.

Today’s cosmetic industry

The actual history of cosmetics in the US is generally not written about well. In fact, over the years I’ve watched basic historical information disappear from the internet, seemingly as a form of censorship. Which actually makes sense in this situation, as the real story of cosmetics and big oil is a rather seedy one. It’s also likely the reason there is virtually no regulation in cosmetics (apart from chemicals used for coloring), since regulation would end the ability to use petroleum byproducts in products.

In short, “In the 1950s, government subsidies incentivized companies to process oil byproducts into synthetic chemicals and resins. Capitalizing on these generous subsidies, the cosmetic industry hired chemical engineers to design their products, with the resulting synthetic substances sold as body and skin ‘care’ products.  The cosmetic industry created the misconception that the skin is impervious, and regulations misleadingly classify oil cosmetics as ‘external’ products –  ignoring the effects of dermal chemical absorption.”

Not only was a weird idea developed that the skin actually acts as a barrier to the chemicals put on it (we know now that is highly and dangerously untrue), but without instituting regulation, it allowed for these chemicals to be used for decades of time despite continuous information to the contrary being put out about their safety.

I expect this is precisely why no regulation measure exists. The government supports big oil, and supported oil byproducts being used in cosmetics. If you’re going to promote an industry to use bad chemicals, and you want to get away with it, you have to forego all regulation to ensure those bad chemicals aren’t ruled out.

More recently, adding onto the petroleum problem, a new oil is now being used for cosmetics, complete with its own issues. Palm oil. Though palm oil provides a safer ingredient than petroleum byproducts, it comes with a massive environmental toll in the form of deforestation (reportedly, 8% of the world’s forests were destroyed for palm oil production between 1990 and 2008.) This is also related to peatlands becoming flammable when drained to grow palm, resulting in fires that cause more carbon emissions, and effect the health of those who breathe in the smoke.

palm oil

According to Greenpeace, “more than 900,000 people in Indonesia have suffered acute respiratory infections due to the smoke from fires in 2019, and nearly 10 million children are at risk of lifelong physical and cognitive damages due to air pollution.” In fact, “In the first 10 months of 2019, these fires released an amount of CO2 close to the UK’s total annual greenhouse gas emissions.” Palm is used because it’s a cheap oil, for which production has massively increased in the last several decades.

What are the benefits of hemp cosmetics vs standard?

Now that we’ve gone through how the standard (generally corporate) cosmetics industry is a rather dirty place, this leads us to the benefits that can be gained by using hemp-based cosmetics instead. We already know that hemp offers massive health and environmental benefits (or less detractions) than standard materials in many industries, and for many products. Whether it’s building materials like cement, or leather, paint and finishing products, plastics, or even batteries, hemp offers a safer alternative. And this can be seen for cosmetics as well.

When used in cosmetics, what we’re talking about isn’t hemp flowers, but hemp seed oil. Hemp seed oil is “extracted by cold-pressing hemp seeds. Hemp oil is rich in properties that makes it a very effective moisturizer functioning as an emollient to soften and smoothen the skin. Hemp seed oil is high in essential fatty acids (omegas 3 and 6), polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and other nutrients that keep the skin in a good condition.”

As hemp is natural, recyclable, non-toxic, and biodegradable, it makes the far better option for what to put on your skin, than something toxic that will go directly to your bloodstream. Think about all those oil derivatives, and what that means to your body to be ingesting them.

If you’re wondering if chemical absorption into the bloodstream through the skin is really an issue, (as it is often touted as a non-issue), it’s best to remember that things like birth control patches, nicotine patches, and fentanyl patches are all used for a reason. And understanding that on the one hand, should allow the logic in, that the skin absorbs what’s put on it. This might not go for everything (often an argument to back up using such chemicals), but it’ll go for most things.

According to a Huffington Post article which references Environmental Working Group research, “In 2005, the Environmental Working Group published a combination of two studies that found toxic chemicals in the umbilical cord blood of newborn babies born in the U.S. in the fall of 2004. They screened for more than 400 chemicals, and an astounding 287 toxins were detected within the umbilical cord blood of these newborns.”

cosmetic absorption

What were they? “Of these 287 chemicals, 217 were neurotoxins, and 208 are known to damage growth development or cause birth defects. These toxins included mercury, polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polybrominated and polychlorinated dibenzodioxins and furans (PBCD/F and PBDD/F), perflorinated chemicals (PFCs), organochlorine pesticides like DDT and chlordane, polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), polychlorinated napthalenes (PCNs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and many others. These study results have been largely ignored by the media.” While not all of this relates to cosmetics, many of these chemicals can indeed be found in skincare products.

More specific benefits of hemp cosmetics

We’ve gone over that hemp is safer than petroleum-based cosmetics, but what can it actually do for a person? Here are some basics of the benefits of using hemp cosmetics. When referring to ‘hemp oil’ it means oil derived from the hemp plant, and this implies the presence of CBD. Sometimes CBD oils – which are hemp oils – are sold in concentrated form, but there should always be CBD in hemp oil, unless its specifically taken out to meet a regulation. Even in these cases, there is likely to be a trace amount.

According to Dr. Tina Alster, clinical professor of dermatology at Washington DC’s Georgetown University Medical Center, “CBD may have a positive impact on a variety of health concerns and conditions including chronic pain, joint Inflammation, anxiety, insomnia, headaches, memory, nausea, neurological disorders, skin disorders and more.”

In terms of specifically offering benefits to the skin, Dr. Alster related that “CBD oil has an anti-inflammatory property, which can benefit the skin, and it can also reduce oil production, provide moisture and relieve pain and itching.”

The doctor states, “Topical CBD is safe and works effectively for all skin types. The products are easy to administer. Sufferers of serious medical skin conditions and those who are seeking innovative skincare options can benefit from topical CBD use… Anti-inflammatory properties associated with CBD are beneficial in treating such dermatologic conditions as acne, psoriasis and eczema due to reduction of dryness, irritation and redness. CBD-containing creams, oils, gels and serums not only moisturize and soothe the skin but are also showing encouraging results in relieving pain caused by certain skin disorders.”

Conclusion

Hemp oil offers two basic things for the cosmetics industry. First, it offers a non-toxic base oil to work with which isn’t associated with massive environmental or medical damage. It’s not a byproduct of the oil industry, or a reason for mass deforestation. It’s plant material, and that beats out any synthetic or petroleum-based material out there.

benefits hemp cosmetics

Second, it’s actually good for the skin. It promotes skin health, by offering it the vitamins and minerals that it needs to be functioning at its best. While much in the cosmetics world is meant to cover up imperfections, hemp oil cosmetic products can do the same and more, offering a way to look better, which actually helps eliminate issues by promoting healthier skin function.

Hello and welcome all! Thanks for joining us at CBDtesters.co, your preeminent location for the most important and thought-provoking cannabis and psychedelics-related news globally. Give the site a read-thru regularly to stay up-to-date on the ever-moving landscape of legal drugs and industrial hemp, and make sure to sign up for The THC Weekly Newsletter, so nothing important ever gets by you.

DisclaimerHi, I’m a researcher and writer. I’m not a doctor, lawyer, or businessperson. All information in my articles is sourced and referenced, and all opinions stated are mine. I am not giving anyone advice, and though I am more than happy to discuss topics, should someone have a further question or concern, they should seek guidance from a relevant professional.

The post Look Your Best: The Benefits of Hemp Cosmetics appeared first on CBD Testers.