Benzinga Chicago Cannabis Capital Conference Highlights Women, Minorities

Social equity, preferably known as equity empowerment, was the name of the game at the 15th iteration of the Benzinga Cannabis Capital Conference (BCCC), which took place at the Palmer House Hilton in Chicago on September 13 and 14.  Adult-use cannabis consumption, possession and sales of cannabis products are legal in the State of Illinois.

Through the BCCC series, Benzinga “strives to put a spotlight on the conversation surrounding social equity via panel discussions with organizations that are combating inequality in the cannabis industry, individuals who have been adversely affected by the War on Drugs, and policymakers who are leading the charge on writing legislation to undo the impacts of prohibition,” according to the company event’s website.

​Keeping in line with that mission, Benzinga offer​ed​ discounted conference tickets to owners of marijuana businesses​ that​ have received state certification for their social equity initiatives.

Women + Minorities

Additionally, Benzinga offers scholarships for women and minority-owned businesses. To that end, the company partnered with organizations, including WomenGrow, and Minorities for Medical Marijuana, to showcase their associates on Benzinga’s conference stages and in the exhibit hall.

One of those presenters included Amber Senter of Supernova Women. Despite suffering from Lupus, Senter leads the charge via her 501(c)3 nonprofit organization to empower BIWOC to become self-sufficient shareholders in the cannabis and natural plant medicine space through education, advocacy, and network building.

In the expo hall, female-represented brands were out in full force, including Chicago Norml’s Edi Moore, My Bud Vase’s Doreen Sullivan, MtoM’s Christine Wilson, Illinois Equity Staffing’s Shawnee Williams, HerHighness’ Allison Krongard and Laura Eisman, Budwell’s Sara Hussain, and CannaBellaLux’s Tiffany Woodman, among others.

Women-led brands who pitched from the stage included House of Puff’s Kristina Lopez Adduci, Black Buddah’s Roz McCarthy and 40Tons’s Loriel Alegrete.

In The Ring

Apart from the strong representation of female brands, Benzinga also welcomed more than 150 speakers from top-performing cannabis companies. Three executives of Tyson 2.0, including the legendary heavyweight boxing champion himself, landed on the roster. While retired from the sport, Mike Tyson is now a regular on the cannabis conference tour. During his press conference in the expo hall with former iconic WWE superstar Rick Flair, the latter said, “I love being relevant; and being in marijuana keeps you relevant.”

Mike Tyson, Rick Flair at Benzinga Cannabis Capital Conference

Benzinga’s VP of Events, Elliot Lane, is pleased with the level of participation from all avenues.

“Chicago was our 15th iteration of the Cannabis Capital Conference and second this year,” he said. “The turnout of industry executives, investors and media was overwhelmingly positive, and the response from our attendees has been glowing.”

The Envelope Please…

Of special note were the first annual Benzinga Awards. “Finding the best of the best in cannabis is no easy feat, but someone has to do it. So, we assembled a panel of high-level judges to help us determine who are the people and organizations driving the cannabis industry forward,” said Chief Zinger Jason Raznick.

According to Benzinga, the awards celebrate new, creative, innovative and outstanding people, solutions and companies in the cannabis industry.

Benzinga Cannabis Awards

The winners of this year’s Benzinga Awards are as follows:

  • MOST IMPACTFUL CANNABIS EXECUTIVE OF THE YEAR: Ben Kovler, CEO, founder and chairman of Green Thumb Industries 
  • “BRETT ROPER AWARD” FOR LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT: Nancy Whiteman, founder and CEO of Wana Brands
  • FRIEND OF THE INDUSTRY AWARD: Rep. David Joyce (R) of Ohio told the audience: “God bless you all for taking on this fight. I am going to keep doing my best to help you.”
  • CANNABIS ADVOCATE OF THE YEAR: Mary Bailey of the Last Prisoner Project
  • SOCIAL EQUITY AWARD: Desiree Perez of the The Parent Company
  • BEST CANNABIS LEADER UNDER 40: Luke Anderson, co-founder of Cann
  • ACHIEVEMENT IN BUILDING TRUST: Emily Paxhia, co-founder of Poseidon Investment
  • MOST EFFECTIVE CELEBRITY CANNABIS BRAND: Cookies, founded by Berner
  • CANNABIS INDUSTRY ASSOCIATION OF THE YEAR: US Cannabis Council
  • CANNABIS LIFESTYLE REPORTER OF THE YEAR: Jon Cappetta, High Times Magazine
  • CANNABIS POLICY REPORTER OF THE YEAR: Kyle Jaeger, Marijuana Moment
  • CANNABIS FINANCE REPORTER OF THE YEAR: Tim Seymour, CNBC
  • CANNABIS BUSINESS REPORTER OF THE YEAR: Jeremy Berke, Insider
  • BEST EUROPEAN CANNABIS COMPANY: TILRAY Brands
  • BEST LATIN AMERICAN CANNABIS COMPANY: Khiron Life Sciences
  • BEST CANADIAN CANNABIS COMPANY: Village Farms
  • HOTTEST CANNABIS TECHNOLOGY: Weedmaps
  • BEST CANNABIS LAW FIRM: Foley Hoag, LLP
  • BEST CANNABIS ACCOUNTING FIRM: Crowe LLP
  • BEST INVESTMENT RESEARCH: Scott Greiper, Viridian Capital
  • BEST CANNABIS INDUSTRY ANALYST: Matt Bottomley, Cannacord
  • BEST USE OF CAPITAL: Jushi Holdings
  • MOST INNOVATIVE CANNABIS LENDER: Pelorus Equity Group
  • MOST INNOVATIVE CANNABIS ETF: YOLO – AdvisorShares
  • CANNABIS INVESTORS AWARD – INSTITUTIONAL: Ricky Sandler, Eminence Capital
  • CANNABIS INVESTORS AWARD – PRIVATE EQUITY / VC: Mitch Baruchowitz, Merida Capital
  • BEST CANNABIS RETAIL EXPANSION STRATEGY: Trulieve
  • BEST CANNABIS PARTNERSHIP: TILT, which brought a true social equity partnership to the Shinnecock Indian Nation
  • BEST USE OF CAPITAL: Jushi Holdings
  • BEST M&A DEAL: Flora Growth
  • MOST ENVIRONMENTALLY FRIENDLY OPERATOR: Geomat Patented Water Recovery Systems
  • MOST INNOVATIVE CANNABIS BRAND: Miss Grass
  • MOST INNOVATIVE CANNABIS SMALL BUSINESS: House of Saka – Cannabis-infused wines from Napa Valley

The post Benzinga Chicago Cannabis Capital Conference Highlights Women, Minorities appeared first on Cannabis Now.

Benzinga Chicago Cannabis Capital Conference Wows Participants

Social equity, preferably known as equity empowerment, was the name of the game at the 15th iteration of the Benzinga Cannabis Capital Conference (BCCC), which took place at the Palmer House Hilton in Chicago on September 13 and 14.  Adult-use cannabis consumption, possession and sales of cannabis products are legal in the State of Illinois.

Through the BCCC series, Benzinga “strives to put a spotlight on the conversation surrounding social equity via panel discussions with organizations that are combating inequality in the cannabis industry, individuals who have been adversely affected by the War on Drugs, and policymakers who are leading the charge on writing legislation to undo the impacts of prohibition,” according to the company event’s website.

​Keeping in line with that mission, Benzinga offer​ed​ discounted conference tickets to owners of marijuana businesses​ that​ have received state certification for their social equity initiatives.

Women, Minorities, More

Additionally, Benzinga offers scholarships for women and minority-owned businesses. To that end, the company partnered with organizations, including WomenGrow, and Minorities for Medical Marijuana, to showcase their associates on Benzinga’s conference stages and in the exhibit hall.

One of those presenters included Amber Senter of Supernova Women. Despite suffering from Lupus, Senter leads the charge via her 501(c)3 nonprofit organization to empower BIWOC to become self-sufficient shareholders in the cannabis and natural plant medicine space through education, advocacy, and network building.

In the expo hall, female-represented brands were out in full force, including Chicago Norml’s Edi Moore, My Bud Vase’s Doreen Sullivan, MtoM’s Christine Wilson, Illinois Equity Staffing’s Shawnee Williams, HerHighness’ Allison Krongard and Laura Eisman, Budwell’s Sara Hussain, and CannaBellaLux’s Tiffany Woodman, among others.

Women-led brands who pitched from the stage included House of Puff’s Kristina Lopez Adduci, Black Buddah’s Roz McCarthy and 40Tons’s Loriel Alegrete.

Another Tyson KO

Apart from the strong representation of female brands, Benzinga also welcomed more than 150 speakers from top-performing cannabis companies. Three executives of Tyson 2.0, including the legendary heavyweight boxing champion himself, landed on the roster. While retired from the sport, Tyson is now a regular on the cannabis conference tour. During his press conference in the expo hall with former iconic WWE superstar Rick Flair, the latter said, “I love being relevant; and being in marijuana keeps you relevant.”

Benzinga’s VP of Events, Elliot Lane, is pleased with the level of participation from all avenues.

“Chicago was our 15th iteration of the Cannabis Capital Conference and second this year,” he said. “The turnout of industry executives, investors and media was overwhelmingly positive, and the response from our attendees has been glowing.”

The Envelope Please…

Of special note were the first annual Benzinga Awards. “Finding the best of the best in cannabis is no easy feat, but someone has to do it. So, we assembled a panel of high-level judges to help us determine who are the people and organizations driving the cannabis industry forward,” said Chief Zinger Jason Raznick.

According to Benzinga, the awards celebrate new, creative, innovative and outstanding people, solutions and companies in the cannabis industry.

The winners of this year’s Benzinga Awards are as follows:

  • MOST IMPACTFUL CANNABIS EXECUTIVE OF THE YEAR: Ben Kovler, CEO, founder and chairman of Green Thumb Industries 
  • “BRETT ROPER AWARD” FOR LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT: Nancy Whiteman, founder and CEO of Wana Brands
  • FRIEND OF THE INDUSTRY AWARD: Rep. David Joyce (R) of Ohio told the audience: “God bless you all for taking on this fight. I am going to keep doing my best to help you.”
  • CANNABIS ADVOCATE OF THE YEAR: Mary Bailey of the Last Prisoner Project
  • SOCIAL EQUITY AWARD: Desiree Perez of the The Parent Company
  • BEST CANNABIS LEADER UNDER 40: Luke Anderson, co-founder of Cann
  • ACHIEVEMENT IN BUILDING TRUST: Emily Paxhia, co-founder of Poseidon Investment
  • MOST EFFECTIVE CELEBRITY CANNABIS BRAND: Cookies, founded by Berner
  • CANNABIS INDUSTRY ASSOCIATION OF THE YEAR: US Cannabis Council
  • CANNABIS LIFESTYLE REPORTER OF THE YEAR: Jon Cappetta, High Times Magazine
  • CANNABIS POLICY REPORTER OF THE YEAR: Kyle Jaeger, Marijuana Moment
  • CANNABIS FINANCE REPORTER OF THE YEAR: Tim Seymour, CNBC
  • CANNABIS BUSINESS REPORTER OF THE YEAR: Jeremy Berke, Insider
  • BEST EUROPEAN CANNABIS COMPANY: TILRAY Brands
  • BEST LATIN AMERICAN CANNABIS COMPANY: Khiron Life Sciences
  • BEST CANADIAN CANNABIS COMPANY: Village Farms
  • HOTTEST CANNABIS TECHNOLOGY: Weedmaps
  • BEST CANNABIS LAW FIRM: Foley Hoag, LLP
  • BEST CANNABIS ACCOUNTING FIRM: Crowe LLP
  • BEST INVESTMENT RESEARCH: Scott Greiper, Viridian Capital
  • BEST CANNABIS INDUSTRY ANALYST: Matt Bottomley, Cannacord
  • BEST USE OF CAPITAL: Jushi Holdings
  • MOST INNOVATIVE CANNABIS LENDER: Pelorus Equity Group
  • MOST INNOVATIVE CANNABIS ETF: YOLO – AdvisorShares
  • CANNABIS INVESTORS AWARD – INSTITUTIONAL: Ricky Sandler, Eminence Capital
  • CANNABIS INVESTORS AWARD – PRIVATE EQUITY / VC: Mitch Baruchowitz, Merida Capital
  • BEST CANNABIS RETAIL EXPANSION STRATEGY: Trulieve
  • BEST CANNABIS PARTNERSHIP: TILT, which brought a true social equity partnership to the Shinnecock Indian Nation
  • MOST INNOVATIVE CANNABIS SMALL BUSINESS: House of Saka – Cannabis-infused wines from Napa Valley

The post Benzinga Chicago Cannabis Capital Conference Wows Participants appeared first on Cannabis Now.

Forget Croptober. Here Comes Crashtober.

Like California fire season, “Croptober”—the term for the annual flood of sungrown cannabis entering the market during the fall harvest and the subsequent price shock, as supply on hand far outstrips demand—is now a yearlong phenomenon. 

But this year aims to be worse for everyone, as October is due to bring bad tidings for c-suite types and investors in Big Weed. With the third quarter closing Sept. 30 and the next earnings reports for publicly traded companies due beginning Oct. 15, “Croptober” is on track to be “Crashtober,” the autumn of major cannabis companies’ serious problems.

Anticipating this, the #MSOgang appears to be getting ahead of the trouble. Rather than blame consumers for not buying enough cannabis or themselves for growing too much, a parade of executives and investors recently told POLITICO that the real problem is Congress, and that the real reason they have been gushing cash for years now is lawmakers’ failure to pass any number of significant cannabis reform bills.

While federal tax law and federal prohibition no doubt play a significant role, these are also not new problems for cannabis businesses. But as several observers, entrepreneurs and other cannabis business types contacted for this article said, 2022 feels different. 

Investors are tired of seeing companies burn their cash. And with more than a half-billion in losses through half of 2022, companies are running out of cash to burn. 

The American version of Canada’s great bubble bursting, predicted by Cannabis Now earlier this summer, might be coming sooner than we anticipated. 

Just the Feds, Ma’am

Continuing a trend seen all year long—and in defiance of otherwise across-the-board inflation— cannabis prices continue to decline almost everywhere the plant is legal for Americans to buy and consume, according to recent data compiled by Cowen, one of the leading analyst houses tracking the industry. About the only place prices are high(ish) and stable are in states with new adult-use markets with limited competition, such as New Jersey.

Though most every major cannabis company in the United States has a presence in New Jersey as well as New York, where the most recent news is that licensed and regulated retail sales won’t start until 2023, almost a full two years after legalization—and both states have enormous potential measured in the billions of dollars, according to market forecasts—mere promise doesn’t appear to be enough to satisfy the concerns of investors big and small.

Despite revenue from legal cannabis projected to hit $32 billion this year and $72 billion by the end of the decade, big marijuana companies are pleading poverty. So far, the country’s two dozen biggest publicly traded firms lost a combined $550 million on revenues of $4.5 billion, as per POLITICO. 

Some observers have said that cannabis companies themselves are at least partly to blame—that, maybe, they invested too much in enormous grow facilities that don’t produce enough good cannabis, or at least produced enough mediocre cannabis to depress prices and encourage consumers to shop on the traditional market. But at least publicly, most investor types are blaming lawmakers.

“The idiots in Washington are causing the problem,” as Matt Hawkins, a private equity veteran and founder of Entourage Effect Capital, which sunk big money into MSOs including Green Thumb Industries, told POLITICO. “They need to understand that in order for this industry to grow and thrive that has to be passed.”

Even advocates of small weed agreed with the general analysis. Everybody is hurt hard by tax code Section 280, which forbids cannabis businesses from making the normal tax deductions—deductions that, for other firms, mean the difference between profit and a loss, or a tiny margin or a fatter one. 

“Obviously every business’ situation is different, but I would concur that federal policy is about the most significant impediment to positive cash flow, particularly the impact of 280E,” said Aaron Smith, executive director of the National Cannabis Industry Association, which advocates for small businesses. “The situation is worse for smaller businesses which cannot withstand extended periods of losses.”

That said, Smith’s sympathy is limited for large firms who based revenue projections on assumptions that federal policy would change—and then “didn’t and don’t invest in the effort to change federal policies either,” he said.

Dealing With the Flow

Observers note that cannabis executives appear to be admitting there’s trouble in various ways, sometimes subtly, sometimes very obviously. Companies have already laid off hundreds of workers across the country, as MJBizDaily reported last month.

At the recent Benzinga Cannabis Capital Conference in Chicago, Curaleaf founder and chairman Boris Jordan turned heads with the prediction that 50% of cannabis sales “five to ten years out” will be infused beverages, with the other half (presumably) split between flower, edibles and vape cartridges currently dominating the market.

The prediction earned Jordan some headlines in the business press and some mockery on Twitter, but he may also have tipped his hand. 

In an interview with Benzinga, Jordan also predicted that significant federal legislation would be coming by the end of the year. 

He made a similar prediction—that the SAFE Banking Act, federal legislation that would allow better access to banks and investors for state-legal cannabis businesses, would pass during the lame duck session between the midterm elections and the next session of Congress—back in May. 

He may be legitimately hopeful, and he may be right, but by hedging his bets that federal help is coming—or even something better five years down the road—he may also be speaking to anxious and impatient investors, wondering when (if ever) their returns are coming. Something must change, but if it’s not federal policy, cannabis companies will need to make a major correction starting as soon as this fall—the fall of fail.

The post Forget Croptober. Here Comes Crashtober. appeared first on Cannabis Now.

Benzinga Cannabis Conference Kicks Off in Chicago Next Week

Thousands of cannabis entrepreneurs and activists are expected to descend upon Chicago next week for the Benzinga Cannabis Capital Conference.

The two-day event kicks off on September 13 at the Palmer House Hilton, where attendees will be given an opportunity to broaden their network and listen to a who’s-who of keynote speakers.

It is the 15th edition of the cannabis conference, which Benzinga, a financial media outlet, bills as the top cannabis conference in the world, and a summit where “where stars are made and real deals happen.”

The outlet says that a recent cannabis conference “was the very site where Trulieve Cannabis team met Harvest Health & Recreation, which ultimately led to a $2.1-billion acquisition.”

“At this modern day gathering, you’ll have the opportunity to meet some of the most important cannabis stars at the Benzinga Cannabis Capital Conference where you’ll rub shoulders with executives of top-performing companies, glean priceless insights from the world’s leading cannabis investors, entrepreneurs, social equity leaders, women who have taken the industry by storm and so many more,” the outlet said in an announcement earlier this summer.

“Now in its 15th edition, the CCC is where countless companies, from large to small to startups, have met investors who supported them with tens of millions. Sit in on the numerous presentations, fireside chats and exclusive interviews. Enjoy friendly access to companies representing more than 90% of the cannabis industry’s market capitalization in one place.”

Courtesy of Benzinga

Benzinga is offering three different ticket packages for the conference. For $797.00, attendees can receive a general admission ticket, which will get them two-day admission to conference content tracks, two-day admission to the exhibit hall, as well as access to cocktail receptions.

A VIP Pass will cost you just under $1,300, but it will get you the following: “Access to Conference VIP Lounge; Access to VIP area at the Afterparty; Special Invites to Dinners & Parties; Express Check-In; VIP name badge; Reserved Seating; 2 Day Admission to conference content tracks; 2 Day Admission to the Exhibit Hall; Access to Cocktail Receptions both days; Access to Conference Networking App.”

A third option, the Investor Pass, is “for institutional and accredited investors,” and costs just under $300.

Those in attendance will have the chance to listen to several luminaries from the cannabis industry: Charlie Bachtell, CEO Cresco Labs, LLC; Kim Rivers, CEO Trulieve Cannabis Corp.; Chris Beals, CEO WeedMaps; Wendy Berger, Board Member Green Thumb Industries; Boris Jordan, Executive Chairman of the Board Curaleaf; and Michael DeGiglio, CEO Village Farms.

In addition, the conference will be highlighted by dozens of other notable speakers, such as Vic Mensa, who recently launched Chicago’s first Black-owned cannabis brand 93 Boyz; NFL Hall of Famer Calvin Johnson, the founder of Michigan-based cannabis company Primitiv; boxing legend Mike Tyson, the co-founder of the cannabis company Tyson 2.0; and former professional wrestler Ric Flair, who is involved in Tyson 2.0.

Three members of the U.S. House will also speak at the conference: Rep. Marie Newman (D-IL); Rep. Troy Carter (D-LA); and Rep. Dave Joyce (R-OH).

The conference will also have a special emphasis on social equity.

“Through our Cannabis Capital Conference series, we strive to put a spotlight on the conversation surrounding social equity via panel discussions with organizations who are combating inequality in the cannabis industry, individuals who have been adversely affected by the War on Drugs, and policymakers who are leading the charge on writing legislation to undo the impacts of prohibition,” Benzinga says. “Additionally, Benzinga has committed to donating a percentage of all event ticket sales to Last Prisoner Project, a non-profit organization dedicated to cannabis criminal justice reform. We are also proud to offer discounted conference tickets to owners of marijuana businesses who have received state certification for their social equity initiatives.”

The post Benzinga Cannabis Conference Kicks Off in Chicago Next Week appeared first on High Times.

Benzinga Cannabis Conference in Miami Draws Big Investors 

Last week’s Benzinga Cannabis Capital Markets Conference in Miami kicked off on 4/20 bringing together a venerable cornucopia of the cannabis industry. Cannabis Now was on hand to connect with some of the industry’s most illustrious power players to discover where the market is heading. Two such thought leaders, Mitch Baruchowitz of Merida Capital Holdings and Troy Datcher of The Parent Company, shared some insights on what makes their successful companies tick, and why they chose to attend the Benzinga conference.  

Baruchowitz’s slide presentation at the iconic Fontainebleau Miami Beach described using data to create a disruptive thesis. He elucidated Merida’s investment thesis as picking regions rather than companies. For 20 minutes, Baruchowitz went on to discuss data and disruption, explaining that the firm’s prediction model has helped them solidify their place as one of the cannabis industry’s leading investment groups.

“We find companies that we believe fit the areas that we think are disproportionately large, and I think that’s resonated in the last few years with people who want to hear how we keep ending up in the right place,” he said. 

Mitchell Baruchowitz of Merida Capital Partners gives a presentation at Benzinga, North America’s leading cannabis investment conference. PHOTO by Cannabis Now

Baruchowitz says Merida Capital uses its Twitter account as a prediction engine, and that the data he’s talking about isn’t that data. Rather, he refers to predictive economic data as “the future that is going to arrive.” 

“That’s on a trajectory,” Baruchowitz said. “We did make predictions four years ago about the projections. We said, ‘Projections were people being revised upwards based on state adoption.’ So, we nailed that because I think most people are projecting $28 billion for 2025. We’re now at approximately $40-$42 billion. Every year its applications keep going up. The data we’re using primarily is more like thin-sliced, precise data that tells us something notable about something, and then we do the work.” 

Baruchowitz isn’t a big fan of the “predictors.” He says he believes that they’ve been wildly wrong because of cannabis’ newness; and it’s impossible to be correct. 

“Merida doesn’t use that type of forward-looking projection,” Baruchowitz said. “I think that it’s effortless for people to project the blank slate of Colombia, for example. There’s been a new blank slate every year, such as in Lesotho. There’s always a shiny new object. Being in the cannabis space for a long time and having many employees means that you don’t have to go down that road and run into a brick wall when you find out the projections are off.

Baruchowitz insists that Merida is more about discrete data packets. He believes the company analyzes things that no one else does. Most of his investors are high net-worth individuals or entrepreneurs who want sophisticated exposure to cannabis on the investment side. 

California-based, consumer-focused cannabis business, The Parent Company (TPC), potentially represents such an investment. TPC’s company portfolio includes trusted consumer packaged goods (CPG) brands, such as Caliva and Jay-Z’s more recent Monogram. The company’s newly minted CEO, Troy Datcher, believes the brands will be the basis of the cannabis industry’s future.

Datcher attended the Benzinga conference to network with investors as well as regulators. He believes the conference presents an excellent opportunity for him to meet other industry entrepreneurs. 

“I’d been in the cannabis industry for 150 days as of the beginning of Benzinga last week. So, attending the conference was a great opportunity for me to mix and mingle with the folks that are a part of the industry and can provide some insight on the challenges they’re facing and how they’re tackling some of those challenges,” Datcher said, adding that the Benzinga conference provides TPC with a platform for sharing their own story.

“Hopefully that story resonates with either someone who wants to be a member of our team, or to analysts who are there covering companies like ours, as well as investors,” he said. 

Datcher also credits Benzinga for being in the right place at the right time to spend some quality face time with lawmakers, including Ohio Congressman Joyce and South Carolina’s Nancy Mace

“It was great and informative to hear where our latest legislators are in terms of supporting the industry,” he said.  

Datcher cites the variety and diversity of the speakers as another draw of the Benzinga conference. 

“I think the content and the types of folks who showcased were incredibly diverse and impressive. From a single-state operator (SSO) to multi-state operators (MSO) to folks on the front end of innovation for the industry, Benzinga creates an atmosphere where everyone wants to participate in the conversation,” Datcher said. “That’s great for someone like me, who again, is looking to absorb as much as possible and create a great curve for learning.”

The post Benzinga Cannabis Conference in Miami Draws Big Investors  appeared first on Cannabis Now.

What’s going on for 4/20 in New York?

I don’t need to explain to you what 4/20 is about. If you’re reading this, you already know the day is for celebrating the plant—anything else is just noise.

While I’ve long advocated that this is NOT the day to try and launch your brand, or drop a new SKU, if there’s one thing I’m sure of, it’s that the first ingredient for a successful celebration is community; so it’s only natural we do something big.

Now, we’ve had a LOT of legal 4/20’s in California already, but New York

The Quick & Dirty

So here’s the rundown: My buddy Doja EK came to me with this idea a few months back of doing a Hippie Hill-style smokeout in Manhattan. Obviously, I was immediately interested—it’s where High Times was born; it’s where I was born, and 4/20 in the Big Apple has ALWAYS been special, so now that legalization has come and COVID is basically over, let’s get after it.

Now Doja had already done an event with Astor Club last year, and had been recruiting. He’d talked to California legends like Alien Labs, Green Dawg, The Fire Society. He’d connected with New York heavies like the Haymaker team, On the Revel & Buddy’s Bodega. Everyone was in alignment, we’re going to do it for the culture—no infrastructure, no tickets, just homies & headstash, all as one.

Somewhere along the line, an announcement was rushed with a ton of logos on it and, understandably, that left a lot of others feeling on the outside of something that was always supposed to involve all of us, so we’ve flipped the script a bit. No more logos, no more brand names—just an open invitation to anyone, local or tourist, transplant or visitor.

Courtesy of High Times

Next Wednesday, to celebrate the highest of holy days, we will descend on a random outdoor location in New York. There will be no (reasonable) capacity. There will be no tickets or fees. Just a whole lot of pot heads lighting up together in celebration of our favorite plant, in one of the greatest cities in the world, on the cusp of its legal cannabis market. We’ll announce the location that morning so as not to give the fuzz too much of a heads up, so if you’d like to be notified of where we’re meeting, RSVP here.

Whether you buy from a guy or grow your own, come pull up and sesh with us. We’re trying to smell ALL the flowers!

But that’s not all! 

Since announcing this intention to return home for this, an enormous outpouring of support has come my way. And with that, a whole itinerary of other events happening around our event started hitting my desk. Now as I said, this day, our party—this was always about the people, so in that spirit, here are a few other things I plan on pulling up to, and I hope to see y’all there as well! Come find me and we’ll burn one together—it’s going to be a week to remember!

Courtesy of High Times

After we wrap up at our sesh, the official afterparty is going to be held at the iconic institution Webster Hall, for an event dubbed Unity Day. Produced by the homies at Cannademix, and officially cosigned by Senator Sanders office, the event will feature performances by Wu-Tang’s Inspectah Deck and Cappadonna. Rocking from 6 p.m. all the way until 2 a.m., this is our late night pull up FOR SURE. I used to throw shows at this venue, so this one is a real full circle moment for me, and I’d love for you all to be there. They invited the weed kid back!!! Grab tickets for this one here and let’s close out the night together.

More To Do!

Courtesy of Certz

Another evening sesh worth attending that night is the release party for Banana Certz, the collab between Jokes Up Certz and Golden State Banana. The event, thrown by Premium Sesh, runs from 7 p.m. until late. I’m not entirely sure the location of the event, but I imagine they don’t want just anyone to pull up, so they probably tell you after you buy your access. Tickets are $40, and available here. In Certz’s own words, this collab is about “closing the gap” between the coasts, and putting the key operators in the same room. That’s definitely a vibe we can get with!

Courtesy of Jim Jones

In case you’re looking to celebrate with live music, either Phish at the Garden or the Cannaval in Jersey seem like the best options. Now, while I certainly align with the Dead, I never really got Phish, so the hip-hop event in NJ would be my pick. Featuring performances by Jim Jones, Dave East, Trav, Maino, Yung LB & more, this one looks like it’s going to have all the energy you’ll need to keep rocking through what tends to be a drowsy day. Tickets here.

In town early?

Courtesy of Cannaclusive

Also, while you’re here let me throw in some extra selfless promotion: If you’re around the City on the 19th, I’ll be speaking on building media relationships for Cannaclusive’s event at Soho Works. I’ve also got my guy Andrew Ward from Benzinga (and here), as well as Alexis Isaacs from Mattio and Keith Nelson Jr. from Men’s Health on the panel, so it should be a great conversation. RSVP here to get our cheat codes.

If California is still in the Building…

Courtesy of High Rise & Green Street Festival

Finally, and as a little bonus for those still in California (if you’re not going to Hippy Hill!), and Los Angeles specifically (if you’ve read this long, you deserve it!), I recommend checking out the event High Rise is having at the Green Street building. That’s where I’d be if I was in town!

The post What’s going on for 4/20 in New York? appeared first on High Times.

Driven Deliveries se presenta a inversores en conferencia de mercados capitales del cannabis en Florida

MIAMI BEACH—  En el Benzinga Cannabis Capital Conference de este año, el CEO de  Driven Deliveries (OTC: DRVD) Christian Schenk, presenta la compañía en el evento de mercados capitales más grande de Florida. Para la versión de este año, Christian participó en el panel titulado: “Cannabis Tech: las mejores empresas que impactan la industria”. El […]

The post Driven Deliveries se presenta a inversores en conferencia de mercados capitales del cannabis en Florida appeared first on High Times.