DIY Cannabis Skin Cream for the Ultimate in Skincare

We love that weed markets are opening everywhere, but we also love that weed’s increasing popularity has led to a massive DIY world. Sometimes consumers want to know that their product is specifically what they want it to be, especially when its going in, or on, their body. When it comes to looking great, check out this DIY cannabis skin cream recipe, for glowing skin, and no unnecessary chemicals.

Who wants a store bought product when you can make DIY cannabis skin cream in the comfort of your own home? Best way to know you’ve got a great product, is to make it yourself. This site focuses on independent reporting of the cannabis and psychedelic landscapes. You can follow along by subscribing to the THC Weekly Newsletter, which comes full of deals on products likes vapes and edibles, for those who’d rather just buy. Plus, we’ve got tons of offers for popular cannabinoid products including HHC-O, Delta 8Delta 9 THCDelta-10 THCTHCOTHCVTHCP HHC. There are a lot of great products out there, so do your research, and make sure to make the best purchase possible.


Why DIY?

There are plenty of reasons why a person might want to make their own product, rather than buy from a store. Stores generally have standard and streamlined items, which are the same from store to store, state to state, and sometimes country to country as well. There’s not a lot of individualism in product marketing on a large scale, so when buying from a store, you’re getting the same basic product that everyone else gets.

This doesn’t leave a lot of room for variation. And though providers often do supply product listings that include alternative options (no-sugar options, gluten-free options, animal-friendly options, vegan options), it’s sometimes hard to get all your needs met in a regular store. Even a specialty store generally runs off specific recipes, so though it might provide different options to bigger marketplaces, it still can’t necessarily get you the exact product you want.

Besides the inability for personalization, standard product markets are oftentimes dirty. If you want a skin cream, you might prefer it without a bunch of toxic chemicals. Those chemicals are there because these products are made via mass production, whereby they’re expected to travel long distances, and sit on store shelves without going bad. Sometimes, you won’t have the benefit of knowing (or trusting) anything about a product you’re buying off a shelf. As more information comes out about the dicey ingredients in cosmetics, making your own products becomes that much more enticing.

DIY products come out exactly how you desire, since you’re choosing what goes in, and all cooking/processing techniques. When you do it yourself, you don’t have to question what added chemicals there might be, what processing techniques were used (and if they could have left behind residue), and what quality of ingredients went into making the product. When you make it yourself, you can control for all the mentioned factors. Plus, if you happen to like your product with just a little more of this, or just a little less of that, you can make it specific to your needs.

DIY cannabis skin cream can be used for different purposes. Cannabis creams are often used to strengthen the skin and remove blemishes, while other skin ailments like rashes or infections, are also treatable with the same creams. For some, the main purpose is simply to achieve glowing skin, and general beauty maintenance. When it comes to skincare, there are different terms to know, like salve, lotion, ointment, balm, and cream.

A salve can be defined as anything that goes on the skin, whether a lotion, ointment, cream, or balm, although there are more specific definitions. Often, the amount of water in the product will dictate what it’s called. Lotions and creams have more water, for example, while balms are made without water. According to the water definition, salves are in between, but are the starting point for making creams and lotions.

Tons of things can be made at home. Read on for DIY cannabis skin cream options, and also check out other DIY guides for cannabis tea, making your own hash, creating CBN at home, making cannabis tinctures, and infused oils, which are necessary for making salves and creams.

Before you start

The first part of making a cannabis salve, is to start with an infused oil. We already went over the process for making an infused oil, and it remains the same here. First, the cannabis must be decarboxylated if the user wants a THC or CBD cream (rather than THCA and CBDA). On the other hand, as a lot of creams are medicinal, this step is not necessary for many users. Either way, if its to be decarbed, this part comes first.

Different people have their own decarb methods, and the most important thing about getting it right, is matching up your temperature with the amount of time its left in the oven. The general range is 200-300º F (93.3-149º C). At the lower limit, a longer decarb is usually done of between 45 minutes-1 hour, while at the higher limit, its more like 15-20 minutes.

It’s possible to go as high as 325º F (162º C) and only leave it in for about 5 minutes. Before sticking it in an oven, the weed should be broken up to just above a powder, and spread out evenly on a baking sheet, pan, or tin foil. Some opt to cover with a baking sheet or tin foil to catch (and re-condense) vaporized cannabinoids, but how much this helps, is hard to say.

Another option here is to use an already-made infused oil. In this case, you might actually find it best to pick something up from your local dispensary, if that’s an option, or use something you already have lying around. Your third option is to do the raw-cannabis-directly-in-the-oil method, which will decarboxylate the weed, but maybe not as completely as with an oven.

On the plus side, for this last option, an oven isn’t necessary, so if you don’t have one, you don’t need one. Interested salve-makers can decide what works best for their specific situation. The instructions for in-oil decarbing, and making a cannabis infused oil, are here. The following ingredients are necessary once you have your oil.

  1. 1.5 cups of infused cannabis oil
  2. 1/3 cup olive oil
  3. 1/3 cup beeswax (vegan options: organic soy wax, candelilla wax, or carnauba wax – in the same amounts)
  4. A double-boiler, or standard pot
  5. Container for the salve, glass is best.
  6. Your choice – want to smell nice? Add in a few drops of your favorite essential oil, like lavender or peppermint
  7. Your choice – want it to help your skin more? Add in 1 tablespoon of Shea butter, or 1 teaspoon of vitamin E oil

DIY cannabis skin cream instructions

Now that you’ve got your infused cannabis oil, the next part is to turn it into a salve. Always remember, that more heat equals more ruined cannabinoids, so in all parts where heat is necessary, never go above the intended limit, or for longer than a safe amount of time. If you’re using a pre-made oil, and its solidified, you’ll need to melt it first, for which a double boiler works best. Once its liquified, or if you just made some oil, the next step is to mix stuff together.

  • Put 1/3 cup beeswax in a pot or double boiler, and heat until melted. You can have the heat up for this, but turn it down to low upon melting.
  • Stir in 1.5 cups of cannabis-infused oil, along with 1/3 cup olive oil. If you’re adding in vitamin E or a few drops of an essential oil, now is the time.
  • Stir until everything is evenly mixed together.
  • Once mixed completely, immediately remove from heat and put in storage containers.
  • It will harden in the containers as it cools. And is ready for use once its stiff and at a resting temperature.
  • Best to store in a cool dark location, and if possible, use storage containers that don’t allow in the sun (tinted glass, for example).

That’s actually about it. The process is pretty quick, and nets you an oil you can use all over your body. Sometimes, the salve will crack as it cools down, and though this has no bearing on the product, for those who prefer a cleaner aesthetic, the salve-maker can put the salve in a mixing bowl when its still hot, allow it to partially cool down, and then whip it with the mixer, before putting in storage.

If you want a more cream-like or lotion-like product, you can create this from your salve. You’ll always need your salve first, as making a lotion is the last step. To do this, take your salve, along with 1 cup Aloe vera, 1 teaspoon vitamin E oil, and 2 tablespoons of shea or cocoa butter. And then mix it all together. Voila, your salve is now a lotion.

Conclusion

There you have it. If you’re in the market for some skin care products and don’t want the standard off-the-shelf offering, get in there with some DIY cannabis skin scream, from your very own kitchen. Luckily, cannabis products are some of the easiest to make, and when done properly, create healthy options, for which you as the maker, know exactly what went down to create them. As always, remember there are multiple recipes for everything, so if you’re not quite happy with what’s in this article, do a little research to find your perfect recipe.

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Can Cannabis Help Reduce Fatigue?

Can cannabis help reduce fatigue? Typically, one would think cannabis causes fatigue. An indica brand glues you to the couch. A sativa strain may have you up and active, but after the high wears off, you’re fatigued or “burned out” – right? According to a new US study, that depends on the individual. “[T]he magnitude […]

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Cannabis Topicals for Sunburns – Do They Work?

In the last several years, cannabis topicals have taken hold in the cannabis market and have even gained the attention of numerous beauty brands. Cannabis topicals, particularly those containing CBD, are seen in many everyday beauty products. With spring and summer right around the corner, this season we’ll explore if cannabis topicals work for sunburns. […]

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Look Your Best: The Benefits of Hemp Cosmetics

There are a lot of ways to use the cannabis plant, and a lot of products that can be made. Whether a person wants to smoke flower, vape a concentrate, eat an edible, inhale via a nasal spray, get it through a patch, or rub it all over their skin, each of these methods allows a person to ingest compounds, or use the plant in some way. In the case of cosmetics, the goal isn’t to get high, the goal is to look good. So here are some basics of the benefits of hemp cosmetics.

The benefits of hemp cosmetics are substantial compared to standard petroleum-based cosmetics, and this is good for personal health, and the environment. Cannabis is great in that way, offering tons of positive medical and recreational attributes from smoking up, to getting ready for a night out. Plus, with the new and wide-ranging cannabinoids market, not only can products be bought outside of regulation, but there are tons of new offerings including delta-8 THC, THCV, and HHC among others. Check out all our current deals and find the products perfect for you.


What are hemp cosmetics?

As always, before getting into the benefits of hemp cosmetics, its best to first describe what we’re talking about. Most people probably have a working definition of cosmetics in their head. Nonetheless, for anyone that needs a formal definition, cosmetics are “relating to, or making for beauty especially of the complexion.” With a second definition defining that this is “done or made for the sake of appearance.”

In other words, makeup, and skin care items. Whether you’re moisturizing your skin to get that awesome healthy glow, rubbing rouge on your cheeks, covering up those blemishes, or putting thickening cream in your hair, these are all examples of products used to improve appearance, and they all fit under the title of ‘cosmetics’.

Cosmetics are far and away mainly female bought items. In very few societies today is it standard for men to wear makeup, though this certainly doesn’t preclude them from doing so. Especially when it comes to things like covering blemishes, or hair care (including shaving), men do take part in the market as well.

hemp cosmetics

Hemp cosmetics are cosmetics that incorporate hemp into their ingredients list, many using hemp oil as the base for the product. With tons of medical properties, there are many benefits to the user for using of hemp cosmetics. This isn’t simply because hemp can offer so much, but also as an alternative to the often-not-safe chemicals used in standard cosmetics today.

Today’s cosmetic industry

The actual history of cosmetics in the US is generally not written about well. In fact, over the years I’ve watched basic historical information disappear from the internet, seemingly as a form of censorship. Which actually makes sense in this situation, as the real story of cosmetics and big oil is a rather seedy one. It’s also likely the reason there is virtually no regulation in cosmetics (apart from chemicals used for coloring), since regulation would end the ability to use petroleum byproducts in products.

In short, “In the 1950s, government subsidies incentivized companies to process oil byproducts into synthetic chemicals and resins. Capitalizing on these generous subsidies, the cosmetic industry hired chemical engineers to design their products, with the resulting synthetic substances sold as body and skin ‘care’ products.  The cosmetic industry created the misconception that the skin is impervious, and regulations misleadingly classify oil cosmetics as ‘external’ products –  ignoring the effects of dermal chemical absorption.”

Not only was a weird idea developed that the skin actually acts as a barrier to the chemicals put on it (we know now that is highly and dangerously untrue), but without instituting regulation, it allowed for these chemicals to be used for decades of time despite continuous information to the contrary being put out about their safety.

I expect this is precisely why no regulation measure exists. The government supports big oil, and supported oil byproducts being used in cosmetics. If you’re going to promote an industry to use bad chemicals, and you want to get away with it, you have to forego all regulation to ensure those bad chemicals aren’t ruled out.

More recently, adding onto the petroleum problem, a new oil is now being used for cosmetics, complete with its own issues. Palm oil. Though palm oil provides a safer ingredient than petroleum byproducts, it comes with a massive environmental toll in the form of deforestation (reportedly, 8% of the world’s forests were destroyed for palm oil production between 1990 and 2008.) This is also related to peatlands becoming flammable when drained to grow palm, resulting in fires that cause more carbon emissions, and effect the health of those who breathe in the smoke.

palm oil

According to Greenpeace, “more than 900,000 people in Indonesia have suffered acute respiratory infections due to the smoke from fires in 2019, and nearly 10 million children are at risk of lifelong physical and cognitive damages due to air pollution.” In fact, “In the first 10 months of 2019, these fires released an amount of CO2 close to the UK’s total annual greenhouse gas emissions.” Palm is used because it’s a cheap oil, for which production has massively increased in the last several decades.

What are the benefits of hemp cosmetics vs standard?

Now that we’ve gone through how the standard (generally corporate) cosmetics industry is a rather dirty place, this leads us to the benefits that can be gained by using hemp-based cosmetics instead. We already know that hemp offers massive health and environmental benefits (or less detractions) than standard materials in many industries, and for many products. Whether it’s building materials like cement, or leather, paint and finishing products, plastics, or even batteries, hemp offers a safer alternative. And this can be seen for cosmetics as well.

When used in cosmetics, what we’re talking about isn’t hemp flowers, but hemp seed oil. Hemp seed oil is “extracted by cold-pressing hemp seeds. Hemp oil is rich in properties that makes it a very effective moisturizer functioning as an emollient to soften and smoothen the skin. Hemp seed oil is high in essential fatty acids (omegas 3 and 6), polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and other nutrients that keep the skin in a good condition.”

As hemp is natural, recyclable, non-toxic, and biodegradable, it makes the far better option for what to put on your skin, than something toxic that will go directly to your bloodstream. Think about all those oil derivatives, and what that means to your body to be ingesting them.

If you’re wondering if chemical absorption into the bloodstream through the skin is really an issue, (as it is often touted as a non-issue), it’s best to remember that things like birth control patches, nicotine patches, and fentanyl patches are all used for a reason. And understanding that on the one hand, should allow the logic in, that the skin absorbs what’s put on it. This might not go for everything (often an argument to back up using such chemicals), but it’ll go for most things.

According to a Huffington Post article which references Environmental Working Group research, “In 2005, the Environmental Working Group published a combination of two studies that found toxic chemicals in the umbilical cord blood of newborn babies born in the U.S. in the fall of 2004. They screened for more than 400 chemicals, and an astounding 287 toxins were detected within the umbilical cord blood of these newborns.”

cosmetic absorption

What were they? “Of these 287 chemicals, 217 were neurotoxins, and 208 are known to damage growth development or cause birth defects. These toxins included mercury, polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polybrominated and polychlorinated dibenzodioxins and furans (PBCD/F and PBDD/F), perflorinated chemicals (PFCs), organochlorine pesticides like DDT and chlordane, polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), polychlorinated napthalenes (PCNs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and many others. These study results have been largely ignored by the media.” While not all of this relates to cosmetics, many of these chemicals can indeed be found in skincare products.

More specific benefits of hemp cosmetics

We’ve gone over that hemp is safer than petroleum-based cosmetics, but what can it actually do for a person? Here are some basics of the benefits of using hemp cosmetics. When referring to ‘hemp oil’ it means oil derived from the hemp plant, and this implies the presence of CBD. Sometimes CBD oils – which are hemp oils – are sold in concentrated form, but there should always be CBD in hemp oil, unless its specifically taken out to meet a regulation. Even in these cases, there is likely to be a trace amount.

According to Dr. Tina Alster, clinical professor of dermatology at Washington DC’s Georgetown University Medical Center, “CBD may have a positive impact on a variety of health concerns and conditions including chronic pain, joint Inflammation, anxiety, insomnia, headaches, memory, nausea, neurological disorders, skin disorders and more.”

In terms of specifically offering benefits to the skin, Dr. Alster related that “CBD oil has an anti-inflammatory property, which can benefit the skin, and it can also reduce oil production, provide moisture and relieve pain and itching.”

The doctor states, “Topical CBD is safe and works effectively for all skin types. The products are easy to administer. Sufferers of serious medical skin conditions and those who are seeking innovative skincare options can benefit from topical CBD use… Anti-inflammatory properties associated with CBD are beneficial in treating such dermatologic conditions as acne, psoriasis and eczema due to reduction of dryness, irritation and redness. CBD-containing creams, oils, gels and serums not only moisturize and soothe the skin but are also showing encouraging results in relieving pain caused by certain skin disorders.”

Conclusion

Hemp oil offers two basic things for the cosmetics industry. First, it offers a non-toxic base oil to work with which isn’t associated with massive environmental or medical damage. It’s not a byproduct of the oil industry, or a reason for mass deforestation. It’s plant material, and that beats out any synthetic or petroleum-based material out there.

benefits hemp cosmetics

Second, it’s actually good for the skin. It promotes skin health, by offering it the vitamins and minerals that it needs to be functioning at its best. While much in the cosmetics world is meant to cover up imperfections, hemp oil cosmetic products can do the same and more, offering a way to look better, which actually helps eliminate issues by promoting healthier skin function.

Hello and welcome all! Thanks for joining us at CBDtesters.co, your preeminent location for the most important and thought-provoking cannabis and psychedelics-related news globally. Give the site a read-thru regularly to stay up-to-date on the ever-moving landscape of legal drugs and industrial hemp, and make sure to sign up for The THC Weekly Newsletter, so nothing important ever gets by you.

DisclaimerHi, I’m a researcher and writer. I’m not a doctor, lawyer, or businessperson. All information in my articles is sourced and referenced, and all opinions stated are mine. I am not giving anyone advice, and though I am more than happy to discuss topics, should someone have a further question or concern, they should seek guidance from a relevant professional.

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Is CBD the Secret Ingredient in Successful Beauty Products?

The search for endless beauty has been going on for more than a millennium. From ancient mythologies (hello Cleopatra) to high fashion magazine articles, beauty has always been the focus for many women. The beauty industry strives to accomplish one mission: eternal youth. It’s promoted and sold to consumers on a day-to-day basis. In the […]

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Introducing the 2021 Emerald Cup Harvest Ball – A New Event In Support of Small Cannabis Farmers

The Emerald Cup is a cannabis event that takes place in Northern California. If you ask the organizers, it’s a celebration of cannabis. Those entered in the contest will say that it’s the final arena. Ask anyone else and they’ll tell you that it’s a really good time.  For the first time in their eighteen-year […]

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How to make CBD infused bath bombs

You may be more familiar with taking CBD orally. However, with CBD products’ popularity, there’s a huge variety in products, including lotions and balms. If you’re looking for some relief from joint and muscle pain and you enjoy soaking in a nice hot bath, then these homemade CBD bath bombs may be just the solution […]

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Small Business Spotlight: BRNT Designs

BRNT Design is a Canada-based design company specializing in bongs and accessories that focus on design, features, and cleaning. They started in 2017 with the Hexagon and have moved forward and now ship to the USA.

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Cannabeauty – Using CBD Oil for Skin Care

You love your skin, you love to smoke, so why not mix the two? CBD oil is fantastic for many different skin care uses.

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Does Cannabis Keep You Young?

Old people look old because their skin stops producing collagen — or, possibly, because they are full of spiteful regret for a life poorly lived, an existence misspent in the pursuit of frivolous things. Younger people look old because their skin was ravaged by something. It’s the sun, mostly, but also stress, overeating, boozing, or — cue the New Age health solutions music!— an onslaught of rampaging free radicals.

If you want good skin that looks young(ish), the best technique is to stay out of the sun. That isn’t good enough, and so we have a beauty and cosmetic industry that promises to either delay one of the above inevitable outcomes, or to fool other peoples’ eyes into thinking it hasn’t already happened.

There is some science at work here. Most skincare products marketed as “anti-aging” are generally just delivery mechanisms for antioxidants. Antioxidants are anything that inhibits oxidation. Common antioxidants in living organisms include vitamin C or A, which your body should have enough of already if you maintain a healthy diet.

But an Australian company working on a “CBD-rich anti-aging cream” believe it’s found evidence that super-cannabinoid CBD is an antioxidant — and that thus, CBD is the secret ingredient in cosmetic and healthcare products that will keep you (looking) young in defiance of your years and bad lifestyle choices. But is it legit?

This is CBD we’re talking about, so the honest answers are “I don’t know” and “maybe,” with an additional “other stuff that is already well known and widely available may work just as well, if not better.” But since neither skepticism nor caution can compete for pageviews with a potential fountain of youth, here are the details.

Business Insider’s Australia edition was first to the news that a three-year research project by the University of Technology Sydney and Bod Australia has turned up a new “family of proteins in human cells that acting as anti-ageing [sic] agents.”

Having made this discovery, “BOD and UTS are [now] exploring the combination of those proteins with CBD in topical anti-ageing creams,” the BI item posted last week reported. Adele Hosseini, Bod’s chief scientific officer, also went one step further. In an interview with BI, she made the additional claim that “CBD by itself does have some antioxidant properties as well.”

Unfortunately for Bod, they’re a bit late to the punch. There are already numerous anti-aging skin creams with CBD in them available on the market, in drugstores as well as through Amazon or other online retailers.

And though most CBD users appear to be attempting to solve pain, anxiety, depression and insomnia before having the time and space to worry about their youthful appearance, cannabis’s value as a general anti-oxidant is already relatively well-known.

“Cannabis is filled with antioxidants, like vitamin A, vitamin D, and vitamin E, all of which will be helpful in preventing damage and premature crepe-iness under your eyes,” Boston-area dermatologist Joyce Imahiyerobo-Ip told Marie Claire in a 2017 interview. (The author of that piece went on a “CBD-only” beauty-care product “diet” for a month — and absolutely loved it, for what that’s worth.)

This means that all cannabis, not just a concoction that includes a hemp-derived CBD extract, might help preserve the skin. This also means that you could get antioxidants from cannabis, or a product that contains cannabis or a cannabis extract, like CBD, or you could get antioxidants from somewhere else entirely.

This also means that the value of CBD-rich anti-aging products might be debatable — not because they don’t work (they might!) but because other products that are cheaper or more widely available may work just as well as the $89.99 “Defynt CBD Skin Serum” sold by Kush Queen, or the CBD anti-aging cream “with apple stem cells” sold by Kushly.

Maybe the best fact to keep in mind here is the finding that 80% of all “extrinsic skin damage” is caused by exposure to the sun, with alcohol intake, bad diet, stress, and damage from free-radicals making up the rest. If shopping for CBD skin creams keeps you mellow — and keeps you inside, and away from the sun — you just may find that it benefits, if not in the way you (or the product you’re buying) anticipate.

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