CBD May Magnify Effects of THC in Edibles, Johns Hopkins Study Suggests

According to a study published Feb. 13 in JAMA Network Open, when THC was combined with CBD in edibles, they produced significantly stronger subjective drug effects, greater impairment of cognitive and psychomotor ability. 

The study supports what Harvard Professor Dr. Lester Grinspoon and many others have said all along: that CBD combined with THC produces stronger effects, part of what’s often called the entourage or ensemble effect.

The findings indicate that CBD in edibles inhibit the metabolism, or breakdown, of THC, which may result in stronger and longer effects. In the study, impairment was considered an adverse effect. 

Researchers observed 18 adults, 11 male and 7 female from January 2021 to March 2022 at the Behavioral Pharmacology Research Unit at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center in Baltimore, Maryland.

Study volunteers took part in three sessions eating infused brownies, separated for a week or more. In each session, participants ate a brownie with either 20 mg of THC, 20 mg of THC and 640 mg of CBD, or no THC or CBD as placebo. Neither the participants nor the investigators knew in advance what was in the brownie that participants ate as a double blind study.

Participants were also given a drug cocktail consisting of five cytochrome (CYP) probe drugs: 100 mg caffeine, 25 mg losartan, 20 mg omeprazole, 30 mg dextromethorphan, and 2 mg midazolam, 30 minutes after eating each brownie.

Researchers noted that the maximum amount of THC measured in participants’ blood samples was almost twice as high after consuming a brownie containing a CBD-dominant extract (with 640 mg of CBD) than after eating a brownie with only THC, even though the dose of THC in each brownie—20 mg—was the same. 

Researchers acknowledged that edibles are metabolized very differently than other delivery methods.

“The fact that THC and CBD were orally administered was very important for the study, and played a large role in the behavioral effects and drug interactions we saw,” study author Austin Zamarripa, Ph.D. said, as quoted by News Medical.

“Overall, we saw stronger subjective drug effects, greater impairment of cognitive [thinking] and psychomotor [moving] ability and greater increase in heart rate when the same dose of THC was given in a high CBD cannabis extract, compared with a high THC extract with no CBD,” said Zamarripa.

To allow for comparison, blood samples were collected from study participants before each session, along with their vital signs, and their cognitive and psychomotor performance were measured. Participants provided blood and urine samples at timed intervals for 12 hours and then again about 24 hours after eating a dose. 

Self-reported effects were measured using the Drug Effect Questionnaire (DEQ), a standardized tool used to measure aspects of subjective experiences after being given a psychoactive drug (in this case, cannabis).

Using the DEQ system, participants rated subjective effects from the edibles with a scale from 0 to 100, with 0 being “not at all affected” and 100 being “extremely affected.”

Participants reported greater increases in overall drug effects when they took the high oral dose of CBD.

“We have demonstrated that with a relatively high oral dose of CBD [640 mg] there can be significant metabolic interactions between THC and CBD, such that the THC effects are stronger, longer-lasting, and tend to reflect an increase in unwanted adverse effects,” says Ryan Vandrey, Ph.D., professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and the study’s senior author.

The study differs from previous findings. A study published in November 2022 in the journal Neuropsychology attempted to determine if CBD reduces the adverse effects of THC, which could be considered as including impairment. But they found that CBD doesn’t necessarily show evidence of reducing adverse side effects.

Researchers said that future studies are needed to better understand the impact of CBD and THC doses.

The post CBD May Magnify Effects of THC in Edibles, Johns Hopkins Study Suggests appeared first on High Times.

House Bill 837 Aims to Legalize Pot Possession, Home Grow in Maryland

Activists behind a ballot referendum to legalize cannabis in Maryland launched a new ad campaign last week, urging voters to support the proposal when they go to the polls on November 8. If passed, the ballot measure would make Maryland the 20th state in the union to legalize recreational marijuana for adults.

In April, the Maryland General Assembly passed two bills designed to legalize recreational marijuana. Under the proposals, Maryland voters will decide in this fall’s general election if cannabis should be legalized for adults, leaving lawmakers to pass additional legislation to regulate the commercial cannabis industry.

“We’re at the beginning of an important process where we begin to look again at how we have treated the substance—cannabis,” Delegate Luke Clippinger, the chair of the House Judiciary Committee and the sponsor of the legislation, told his colleagues in the House of Delegates when they passed the bills earlier this year.

The legislation approved by lawmakers includes House Bill 837, a measure that would legalize possession of up to 1 1/2 ounces of marijuana for adults and create an equitable path to cannabis legalization, according to Clippinger. The bill would also allow adults to cultivate up to two cannabis plants at home.

Maryland Voters to Decide on Question 4 in November

House Bill 837 will go into effect if voters approve House Bill 1, a cannabis legalization constitutional amendment measure that will appear as Question 4 on the ballot for the November general election. The referendum is supported largely by Trulieve, a cannabis producer and retailer with operations in eight states, including three medical marijuana dispensaries in Maryland.

On Thursday, the campaign to pass Question 4 launched a new ad campaign featuring a website and video encouraging voters to support cannabis legalization in Maryland. Eugene Monroe, a former offensive lineman for the NFL’s Baltimore Ravens and the chairman of the committee sponsoring the referendum campaign, said the ballot measure would create economic opportunities for both entrepreneurs and workers.

“Legalizing cannabis would stimulate Maryland’s economy and create tens of thousands of good-paying jobs, while allowing Maryland residents to benefit from vital investments in education, public health, and public safety funded by cannabis taxes,” Monroe said in a statement quoted by the Washington Post.

Supporters of cannabis policy reform in the Maryland General Assembly have said that legalizing marijuana will help the state address the harms caused by prohibition and the War on Drugs. A study from the American Civil Liberties Union showed that between 2010 and 2018, Black people in Maryland were more than twice as likely to be arrested for a marijuana-related offense than white people, despite evidence that the two groups use cannabis at nearly equal rates.

“Passing Question 4 will put an end to the failed criminalization of cannabis, create a well-regulated legal marijuana market centered around equity, and open up new doors for local entrepreneurs and small business owners,” Monroe said in the statement.

Delegate Jazz Lewis of Prince George’s County, who gave his reluctant approval to the legislation passed earlier this year, said that the legal cannabis industry should be open to all.

“We need to make sure that we build a brand new industry where people can get in where it is most appropriate for them, and that they have a support system around them so that they can thrive,” said Lewis.

Maryland legalized medical marijuana in 2014, leading to the launch of the medicinal cannabis industry three years later. But not one of the businesses approved to operate in the industry was Black-owned. Delegate Gabriel Acevero, who represents part of Montgomery County, said that the recreational cannabis industry must not follow the same path.

“The Maryland General Assembly unfortunately got it wrong on medical cannabis,” said Acevero. “It did not prioritize equity, it did not ensure that – in an industry that now generates millions – that communities most impacted would be able to participate in that.”

“We’re not prioritizing mitigating the impacts of the racist drug war – we’re just moving on this issue because we recognize that it’s very popular with Marylanders and for some people, it’s politically expedient,” Acevero added. “But we have to get this right.”

Delegate David Moon, who represents a different section of Montgomery County, is the chair of the criminal justice impacts subcommittee of the cannabis legalization workgroup. He said that the group will wait until the referendum is passed and equity studies are completed early next year before drafting a regulatory system, noting that it could be years before recreational marijuana businesses open their doors to customers.

“That’s exactly why we’re on this sort of two step process,” Moon said. “This whole conversation about licensing requires a few more conversations and analysis, I think because of exactly the history [of the medical marijuana inequities.] The workgroup meetings that have happened have been about getting the basic conversations going on licensing and health effects, so I think it’s really a preview for what’s going to happen in next year’s legislative session.”

With 50 days before the election, Question 4 is receiving strong support from the public. In a poll of 748 likely voters released on Monday morning, 59% said they would vote in favor of the referendum.

The post House Bill 837 Aims to Legalize Pot Possession, Home Grow in Maryland appeared first on High Times.

Recent Johns Hopkins Medicine Study Analyzes Mislabeled CBD Products

A study published by Johns Hopkins Medicine on July 20 found that in an evaluation of numerous CBD products, many contained an inaccurate amount of THC. Entitled “Cannabinoid Content and Label Accuracy of Hemp-Derived Topical Products Available Online and at National Retail Stores,” the study analyzed 105 topical CBD products—specifically lotions, creams, and patches—collected from “online and brick-and-mortar retail locations” in Baltimore, Maryland between July and August 2020 (but analysis didn’t occur until March through June 2022). For storefronts, this included grocery stores, pharmacies, cosmetic and beauty stores, and health and wellness stores.

The study’s lead author, Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Science at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Tory Spindle, Ph.D., explained the objective behind this analysis. “Misleading labels can result in people using poorly regulated and expensive CBD products instead of FDA approved products that are established as safe and effective for a given health condition,” said Spindle.

The results found that 18% of the products contained 10% less CBD than advertised on the label. Additionally, 58% contained 10% more CBD than advertised, while only 24% contained an accurate amount of CBD.

Thirty-five percent of these products contained THC, although the amount per product did not exceed 0.3% THC, which is the legal limit for hemp. Eleven percent of those products were labeled as “THC free,” while 14% said that they contained less than 0.3% THC, and 51% did not mention THC on the labels at all.

Spindle said that the presence of THC in alleged CBD-only products could potentially put some people at risk. “Recent research has shown that people who use CBD products containing even small amounts of THC could potentially test positive for cannabis using a conventional drug test,” Spindle said.

Some of the medical claims made by these products were also inaccurate, and none of them are approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Twenty-eight percent made claims about pain or inflammation, 14% made claims regarding cosmetic or beauty, and 47% specifically noted that they were not approved by the FDA, while the other 53% didn’t mention the FDA at all.

The study’s Senior Author, Ryan Vandrey, Ph.D., who is also professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, explained that this stark difference in results requires more research. “The variability in the chemical content and labeling found in our study highlights the need for better regulatory oversight of CBD products to ensure consumer safety,” Vandrey said.

This study is the latest to discuss the inaccuracy of cannabis products. The University of Kentucky also recently analyzed CBD oil products earlier this month, finding that out of 80 CBD oil products, only 43 contained percentages of CBD that were within 10% of the claimed content. The University of Colorado, Boulder, in partnership with Leafly, also found that cannabis labels were inaccurate.

Johns Hopkins University has continually been involved in support cannabis study efforts over the past few years. In September 2019, Johns Hopkins University launched the Center for Psychedelic and Consciousness Research with the goal of expanding research on psychedelic substances in order to create new treatments for specific psychiatric and behavioral disorders. In October 2020, it partnered with Realm of Caring and Bloom Medicinals to work on cannabis therapy research. In October 2021, the university published a study that showed evidence of cannabis successfully treating anxiety and depression. Earlier this year in February, it asked for volunteers to participate in a paid cannabis and alcohol research initiative (which could net up to $2,660 for study completion for an individual).

The post Recent Johns Hopkins Medicine Study Analyzes Mislabeled CBD Products appeared first on High Times.

Maryland Judge Bans Any Talk of Legalization in Pot Trafficking Trial

One cannabis trafficking case between California and Maryland is putting a spotlight on the blatant hypocrisy of the justice system when it comes to cannabis-related charges.

According to prosecutors, Jonathan Wall, now 27, and 10 others transported over 1,000 kilograms of cannabis from California to Maryland over a period of two years. Given those amounts, Maryland law defines him as a “drug kingpin.”

A federal grand jury indicted him in 2019. In the case of United States v. Wall, if convicted of “conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute marijuana,” Wall faces a sentence of up to 10 years to life in federal prison, with a mandatory 10-year sentence hovering over his head. 

Today marks Wall’s first appearance in court, as he is confined to a federal supermax prison. The elephant in the room, however, is the fact that cannabis is legal for adult purposes in 18 states and several jurisdictions, and legal for medical reasons in dozens more.

On April 26, U.S. District Judge Stephanie Gallagher approved a motion by prosecutors calling for the court to bar any discussion of the cannabis legalization movement currently taking place across the United States, according to Outlaw Report

In other words, the defense team is not to point out how hypocritical cannabis-related non-violent cases are in 2022, given the changes in law.

Prosecutors from the Justice Department filed the motion weeks ago requesting that the U.S. District Court of Maryland preclude Wall’s defense team “from asking questions, presenting evidence, or making arguments regarding the way the law in other jurisdictions treats marijuana.”

“Marijuana is a Schedule I controlled substance and under federal law, it is [a] crime to conspire with others to distribute or possess with the intent to distribute marijuana,” prosecutors wrote in the motion. “The fact that other jurisdictions have legalized marijuana, decriminalized marijuana, are considering decriminalization of certain quantities of marijuana, or have declined to prosecute individuals for crimes involving marijuana, is not relevant to the issues at this trial.”

The topic of legalization is irrelevant to the trial, the judge claims. The motion added that “evidence and argument of this sort is not relevant and should be excluded from this trial.” 

Who is Jonathan Wall?

Andrew Ward profiled Wall for High Times Most Affected last year. “Everybody knows it’s federally illegal, but certainly not to that extent until they find themselves affected first-hand,” he stated. Wall was housed at the Chesapeake Detention Facility in Baltimore, known for its high level of violence. Is it really fair that one person has to weather extreme prison conditions for something that is now legal? 

Wall’s lawyer, Jason Flores-Williams, a noted activist, agreed that the War on Drugs is a dead idea, and people are still paying the consequences because of it. It begs the question of whether or not it is fair for Wall and others to be among the last.

“There are so many people who dedicated and essentially donated their life to getting this plant to where it is today, on the verge of legalization,” Wall told Insider from inside jail. “Do I have to be the last person who is prosecuted for a product that’s making billions of dollars around the world?”

Federal authorities allege that Wall served as the “architect” of the program, when he was just a 20-year-old in Humboldt County. If Wall simply had a license to transport that amount, he wouldn’ve simply been a “distributor” in the world of legal cannabis. One piece of paper makes the difference between that and trafficking charges.

Read Wall’s own account of the alleged crimes. In it, Wall details how rape charges can yield less time in prison than the drug charges he is facing.

Wall tried to get the court to dismiss his case on geographic procedural grounds and again on equal protection grounds, given the arbitrary enforcement of the federal ban on cannabis, depending on the state.

Wall’s trial begins Monday morning in the U.S. District Courthouse in downtown Baltimore, Maryland. As of the time of writing, his petition on Change.org gained over 16,000 signatures.

Visit FreeJonathanWall.com to learn more about his ongoing case.

The post Maryland Judge Bans Any Talk of Legalization in Pot Trafficking Trial appeared first on High Times.

Tuesday, March 10, 2020 Headlines | Marijuana Today Daily News

Marijuana Today Daily Headlines
Tuesday, March 10, 2020 | Curated by host Shea Gunther

// Lawmakers strip secrecy and extraction rules out of marijuana bill (Portland Press Herald)

// USDA Secretary Blames DEA For Strict Hemp Rules (Marijuana Moment)

// Cannabis firm BR Brands plans $43 million deal for Denver’s Dixie Brands (Marijuana Business Daily)


These headlines are brought to you by Curaleaf, one of the leading vertically-integrated cannabis operators in the U.S. With legal medical marijuana dispensaries, cultivation sites, and processing facilities all over the United States, Curaleaf has served more than 165,000 medical cannabis patients and looks forward to helping many more long into the future. Swing over to Curaleaf.com to learn more about this very cool company!


// Businessman pleads guilty to paying $42,500 in bribes to convicted Baltimore delegate Cheryl Glenn (Baltimore Sun)

// South Dakota tribe voting on marijuana legalization (Marijuana Business Daily)

// Prices surge for wholesale cannabis flower in Illinois as demand outstrips supply (Marijuana Business Daily)

// Green Thumb inks $50 million cannabis sale-leaseback deal in Illinois (Marijuana Business Daily)

// Home show teaches ‘senior’ gardeners how to make their own medicine (Growth Op)

// The cheapest legal weed in Canada: Discover these cannabis ‘value brands’ (Leafly)

// Bernie Sanders Just Invited 15,000 People To A Marijuana Legalization Ceremony (Marijuana Moment)


Check out our other projects:
Marijuana Today— Our flagship title, a weekly podcast examining the world of marijuana business and activism with some of the smartest people in the industry and movement.
Marijuana Media Connect— A service that connects industry insiders in the legal marijuana industry with journalists, bloggers, and writers in need of expert sources for their stories.

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Photo: WPD/Flickr

Tuesday, June 30, 2020 Headlines | Marijuana Today Daily News

Marijuana Today Daily Headlines
Tuesday, June 30, 2020 | Curated by host Shea Gunther

// Colorado Governor Signs Marijuana Social Equity Bill Letting Him Expedite Possession Pardons (Marijuana Moment)

// Dixie Brands a Denver-Based Weed Edibles Company Will Change Name (Denver Westword)

// Oregon Psilocybin Measure Has Enough Signatures For November Ballot Activists Say (Marijuana Moment)


These headlines are brought to you by MJToday Media, publishers of this podcast as well as our weekly show Marijuana Today and the most-excellent Green Rush Podcast. And check out our new show Weed Wonks!


// Arizona Medical Marijuana Sales Hit a New Record High in May (Phoenix New Times)

// Another Cannabis Founder Is Out At Aurora Cannabis (Green Market Report)

// San Diego creates new marijuana business regulatory agency (Marijuana Business Daily)

// Gov. Kim Reynolds signs medical cannabis program changes into law (CBS 2 Iowa)

// Top Baltimore Prosecutor Dismisses Drug Possession Cases And Closes Warrants (Marijuana Moment)

// Acreage Holdings Q1 Revenue Increases 15% Sequentially to $24.2 Million (New Cannabis Ventures)

// Acclaimed Cannabis Advocate Dr. Lester Grinspoon Dies At 92 (High Times)


Check out our other projects:Marijuana Today— Our flagship title, a weekly podcast examining the world of marijuana business and activism with some of the smartest people in the industry and movement. • Marijuana Media Connect— A service that connects industry insiders in the legal marijuana industry with journalists, bloggers, and writers in need of expert sources for their stories.

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Photo: J. Stephen Conn/Flickr

Tuesday, June 30, 2020 Headlines | Marijuana Today Daily News

Marijuana Today Daily Headlines
Tuesday, June 30, 2020 | Curated by host Shea Gunther

// Colorado Governor Signs Marijuana Social Equity Bill Letting Him Expedite Possession Pardons (Marijuana Moment)

// Dixie Brands a Denver-Based Weed Edibles Company Will Change Name (Denver Westword)

// Oregon Psilocybin Measure Has Enough Signatures For November Ballot Activists Say (Marijuana Moment)


These headlines are brought to you by MJToday Media, publishers of this podcast as well as our weekly show Marijuana Today and the most-excellent Green Rush Podcast. And check out our new show Weed Wonks!


// Arizona Medical Marijuana Sales Hit a New Record High in May (Phoenix New Times)

// Another Cannabis Founder Is Out At Aurora Cannabis (Green Market Report)

// San Diego creates new marijuana business regulatory agency (Marijuana Business Daily)

// Gov. Kim Reynolds signs medical cannabis program changes into law (CBS 2 Iowa)

// Top Baltimore Prosecutor Dismisses Drug Possession Cases And Closes Warrants (Marijuana Moment)

// Acreage Holdings Q1 Revenue Increases 15% Sequentially to $24.2 Million (New Cannabis Ventures)

// Acclaimed Cannabis Advocate Dr. Lester Grinspoon Dies At 92 (High Times)


Check out our other projects:Marijuana Today— Our flagship title, a weekly podcast examining the world of marijuana business and activism with some of the smartest people in the industry and movement. • Marijuana Media Connect— A service that connects industry insiders in the legal marijuana industry with journalists, bloggers, and writers in need of expert sources for their stories.

Love these headlines? Love our podcast? Support our work with a financial contribution and become a patron.

Photo: J. Stephen Conn/Flickr

Tuesday, March 10, 2020 Headlines | Marijuana Today Daily News

Marijuana Today Daily Headlines
Tuesday, March 10, 2020 | Curated by host Shea Gunther

// Lawmakers strip secrecy and extraction rules out of marijuana bill (Portland Press Herald)

// USDA Secretary Blames DEA For Strict Hemp Rules (Marijuana Moment)

// Cannabis firm BR Brands plans $43 million deal for Denver’s Dixie Brands (Marijuana Business Daily)


These headlines are brought to you by Curaleaf, one of the leading vertically-integrated cannabis operators in the U.S. With legal medical marijuana dispensaries, cultivation sites, and processing facilities all over the United States, Curaleaf has served more than 165,000 medical cannabis patients and looks forward to helping many more long into the future. Swing over to Curaleaf.com to learn more about this very cool company!


// Businessman pleads guilty to paying $42,500 in bribes to convicted Baltimore delegate Cheryl Glenn (Baltimore Sun)

// South Dakota tribe voting on marijuana legalization (Marijuana Business Daily)

// Prices surge for wholesale cannabis flower in Illinois as demand outstrips supply (Marijuana Business Daily)

// Green Thumb inks $50 million cannabis sale-leaseback deal in Illinois (Marijuana Business Daily)

// Home show teaches ‘senior’ gardeners how to make their own medicine (Growth Op)

// The cheapest legal weed in Canada: Discover these cannabis ‘value brands’ (Leafly)

// Bernie Sanders Just Invited 15,000 People To A Marijuana Legalization Ceremony (Marijuana Moment)


Check out our other projects:
Marijuana Today— Our flagship title, a weekly podcast examining the world of marijuana business and activism with some of the smartest people in the industry and movement.
Marijuana Media Connect— A service that connects industry insiders in the legal marijuana industry with journalists, bloggers, and writers in need of expert sources for their stories.

Love these headlines? Love our podcast? Support our work with a financial contribution and become a patron.

Photo: WPD/Flickr

Friday, February 1, 2019 Headlines | Marijuana Today Daily News

Marijuana Today Daily Headlines
Friday, February 1, 2019 | Curated by host Shea Gunther

// World Health Organization Recommends Rescheduling Marijuana Under International Treaties (Forbes)

// Baltimore Prosecutor Files Rare Petition to Erase Cannabis Convictions (Leafly (AP))

// Attorney General backs legal cannabis market in Vermont (VT Digger)


Today’s headlines are brought to you by our friends over at Mason Jar Event Group, which believes in bringing people together and creating community through shared experiences and joyous occasions! Check out all their upcoming events at MasonJarEventGroup.com and get in touch about having them produce your own special cannabis corporate event.


// Oregon Is Producing Twice As Much Cannabis As People Are Using (Oregon Public Radio)

// Oregon’s Cannabis Lab Testing System Flunks State Audit (Leafly)

// History Of Alcohol Prohibition Suggests Advantage For States That Legalize Marijuana Early (Marijuana Moment)

// Feds local police launch raids on up to 50 black-market marijuana grow houses in Denver area (Denver Post)

// Organigram Surpasses One Million Pre-Rolls Production (New Cannabis Ventures)

// A cannabis producer just topped Apple as the favorite stock among millennials (Business Insider)

// Lack of cannabis tracking data in WA sparks confusion, missed business opportunities (Marijuana Business Daily)


Check out our other projects:
Marijuana Today— Our flagship title, a weekly podcast examining the world of marijuana business and activism with some of the smartest people in the industry and movement.
Marijuana Media Connect— A service that connects industry insiders in the legal marijuana industry with journalists, bloggers, and writers in need of expert sources for their stories.

Love these headlines? Love our podcast? Support our work with a financial contribution and become a patron.

Photo: Vaping Three Sixty/Flickr

Wednesday, January 30, 2019 Headlines | Marijuana Today Daily News

Marijuana Today Daily Headlines
Wednesday, January 30, 2019 | Curated by host Shea Gunther

// Baltimore Will No Longer Prosecute Cannabis Possession Cases (Leafly)

// Hemp or marijuana? ISP stops truck driver with 6,701 pounds of ‘green, leafy substance’ (Idaho Statesman)

// Canopy Growth-backed pot company Slang lists on CSE, valued at $480 million (Market Watch)


Today’s headlines are brought to you by our friends over at Eaze.com, California’s top one stop website for legal marijuana delivery. If you live in the golden state, swing over to Eaze.com to see if they are active in your area. With deliveries taking place in less than an hour, it’s never been easier to get legal California marijuana delivery. And of course, if you don’t live where Eaze delivers, you can still benefit from all the useful bits of industry insight and analysis they’ve developed using their properly aggregate and anonymized sales data stream.


// More ‘extinction events’ for CA cannabis companies: Q&A with consultant Jackie McGowan (Marijuana Business Daily)

// What’s the Holdup, New Jersey? Squabbles Delay Legalization, Again (Leafly)

// Take a sneak peek at Denver’s newest social marijuana club about to open on the ‘Green Mile’ (Denver Channel)

// U.S. Funds With $100 Billion Explore Loans to Canadian Pot Firms (Bloomberg)

// Leaked internal document sparks questions over CA cannabis growers group’s finances, management (Marijuana Business Daily)

// Canadian Cannabis Sales Rise Modestly in December (New Cannabis Ventures)

// In Photos: Canada’s First Bongspiel, a Cannabis-Infused Curling Tournament (Leafly)


Check out our other projects:
Marijuana Today— Our flagship title, a weekly podcast examining the world of marijuana business and activism with some of the smartest people in the industry and movement.
Marijuana Media Connect— A service that connects industry insiders in the legal marijuana industry with journalists, bloggers, and writers in need of expert sources for their stories.

Love these headlines? Love our podcast? Support our work with a financial contribution and become a patron.

Photo: Rupa Panda/Flickr