College-Age Adults Getting High at Historic Levels

Marijuana use by college students continued to rise over the past five years, while cannabis use by their same-age peers stayed historically high, according to the latest results of a national study tracking substance use by young adults released this week. 

The National Institutes of Health on Wednesday released data from the 2020 Monitoring the Future study, which has been collecting information on alcohol and drug use by young adults aged 19 through 22 since 1980.

Nora D. Volkow, the director of the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), noted in a press release on Wednesday that, in addition to the increase in marijuana use, college students reported a significant rise in the use of hallucinogens and a substantial drop in alcohol use between 2019 and 2020.

“The COVID-19 pandemic dramatically changed the way that young people interact with one another and offers us an opportunity to examine whether drug-taking behavior has shifted through these changes,” Volcow said. “Moving forward, it will be critical to investigate how and when different substances are used among this young population, and the impact of these shifts over time.”

Marijuana Use Up Significantly

Among college students, 44 percent reported using marijuana during the past year in 2020, compared to 38 percent in 2015. For those not in college, past-year marijuana use remained at the historically high level of 43 percent in 2020, the same rate reported in 2018 and 2019.

Daily use of marijuana (defined as using marijuana on 20 or more occasions in the past 30 days) has also continued to rise, with eight percent of college students reporting daily use compared to five percent in 2015. For adults of the same age not in college, 13 percent reported using cannabis on a daily basis.

“Daily marijuana use is a clear health risk,” said John Schulenberg, lead investigator of the Monitoring the Future study. “The brain is still developing in the early 20s, and as the Surgeon General and others have reported, the scientific evidence indicates that heavy marijuana use can be detrimental to cognitive functioning and mental health.”

“As of 2020, almost one in 12 college students used marijuana on a daily basis, and we know from our research and that of others that heavy marijuana use is associated with poor academic performance and dropping out of college,” Schulenberg continued. “For the almost one in seven young adults aged 19-22 not in college who are daily marijuana users, getting a foothold on the roles and responsibilities of adulthood may be all the more difficult. Of course, the landscape of cannabis use is changing, so continued research is needed regarding negative consequences of heavy use.”

Schulenberg and his fellow researchers cited several likely causes of the increase in marijuana use among college-aged adults, including a reduced perception of harm associated with daily marijuana use. In 2020, 21 percent perceived regular cannabis use as carrying a great risk of harm, the lowest level since 1980.

Use of Hallucinogens Also Up

The use of hallucinogens including LSD, psilocybin mushrooms and other psychedelic substances also increased significantly between 2019 and 2020. Last year, almost nine percent of college students reported using any psychedelic drug, compared to five percent in 2019. The use of hallucinogens by those not in college did not increase significantly, remaining somewhat consistent at about 10 percent in 2020 compared to eight percent in 2019.

“This continued increase in the use of hallucinogens corresponds with the decrease in the perception that hallucinogens are harmful,” Schulenberg said. “For example, the perception that experimental use of LSD carries great harm was at only 28 percent in 2020 among 19-to-22-year-olds. This is an all-time low over the past four decades and far below the highest level of 50 percent in 1989.”

Alcohol use by college students, however, showed a significant drop in 2020, with 56 percent reporting drinking in the past 30 days compared to 62 percent in 2019. Additionally, 28 percent of college students said that they had gotten drunk in the past 30 days, down from 35 percent in 2019, while 24 percent reported binge drinking (drinking five or more drinks in a row during the past two weeks) in 2020, compared to 32 percent the year before. Alcohol use by non-college students remained fairly consistent across all measures, with no reported drop in 2020.

“Historically, college students have reported the highest levels of binge drinking compared to same-aged youth who are not enrolled in college. This is the first year where binge drinking was similar between the two groups,” Schulenberg said. “While binge drinking has been gradually declining among college students for the past few decades, this is a new historic low, which may reflect effects of the COVID-19 pandemic in terms of reduced time with college friends.”

The Monitoring the Future study has been tracking substance use by young adults ages 19 to 22 since 1980. Funded by NIDA, the survey is conducted annually by scientists at the University of Michigan’s Institute for Social Research, Ann Arbor. Results are based on data collected from full-time college students one to four years past high school graduation compared to high school graduates of the same age who are not enrolled in college full time.

The post College-Age Adults Getting High at Historic Levels appeared first on High Times.

Episode 373 – Cannabis Corporations vs. Consumers?

Heather Sullivan and first-time guest Matt Walter join first-time host Ben Larson to talk about the growing complexities involved with legal marijuana markets, corporations, and legislative reform; the regulations governing investing in cannabis; and the similarities between legal marijuana and other vice industries. Produced by Shea Gunther.

Make These Delicious Cannabis-Infused Mocktail Recipes At Home

It’s entirely likely you or someone you know has made the unfortunate and all-too-easy party blunder of imbibing too much alcohol and then adding cannabis to the mix. What seems like a natural social combination of a few drinks and a few joints can quickly turn into nauseous, seemingly unending awfulness. The effects of both cannabis and alcohol can creep up on you unexpectedly, as your body interacts with the intake of chemicals at different speeds. I’ve certainly questioned on many a dark morning the plausibility of ever combining the two reliably, under any circumstances. The jury’s still out.

In the meantime, I can report firsthand that enjoying the two individually is the best plan. To take it even further, you can replace an alcoholic beverage with cannabis-infused mocktails, which is beneficial to your body, as opposed to the known havoc wreaked by alcohol. Instead of drinking a numbing poison for kicks, there is now the option of enjoying a plant that has been used throughout recorded civilization as a holistic natural medicine.

The question is, however, how can you enjoy cannabis consumption as innocuously and acceptably as drinking an alcoholic beverage?

Welcome to the world of “mocktails”: cannabis-infused drinks that are a delicious, effective and subtle alternative to an alcoholic beverage. Take extra care when drinking cannabis, as liquids are processed more quickly by your body than edibles, so you may feel the effects in as little as 10-20 minutes. Let it ride for at least 45-90 minutes before drinking more, to be on the safe side.

Remember: you can always drink more, but you cannot go back in time and drink less.

Luckily, it’s impossible to overdose on cannabis, but the effects can be unpleasant and overwhelming if too much is consumed for your personal tolerance.

Here’s a cannabis-infused simple syrup recipe to use as a base ingredient for your own homemade cannabis mocktail creations. It does take some time and patience, but is well worth the effort:

Cannabis-Infused Lemon Simple Syrup Recipe

INGREDIENTS:

1 cup filtered water
1 cup sugar
12 drops cold-pressed essential lemon oil
2 teaspoons corn syrup
1/2 gram cannabis BHO concentrate
1/2 gram (1 teaspoon) sunflower liquid lecithin (found in health food stores)

DIRECTIONS:

  1. Bring the cup of filtered water to a simmer. Add one cup of sugar (tip: slightly dampening the sugar before adding it to the simmering water will help the crystals incorporate more smoothly), 2-3 drops of essential lemon oil and 1 tsp of corn syrup. Take care not to boil the mixture, as that will alter the ratio of water-to-sugar in the syrup through evaporation.
  2. Loosely cover the saucepan with a lid, and bring the syrup mix to a simmer for 5 minutes. Do not stir, as the sugar may crystallize easily at this stage with the introduction of any foreign particulates. Set it aside to cool slightly during the next step.
  3. Heat cannabis concentrate to a steady 250º F degrees in a glass or stainless steel dish that will be big enough to later accommodate the addition of 1 cup of syrup.
  4. Continue to heat the concentrate until bubbles have stopped at maximum bubble formation, about 5 minutes. Temperatures of stoves and other variables make this step extremely unpredictable; the best way to gauge the correct time is visually. Stir the concentrate slightly with a bamboo skewer while heating to ensure even decarboxylation.
  5. Thin the cannabis oil with 10 drops of essential lemon oil and 1 tsp corn syrup. Mix thoroughly.
  6. Add 1 tsp sunflower liquid lecithin to the cannabis oil mixture. Stir thoroughly while heating at 175º F for 5 minutes. Remove from heat.
  7. Quickly add the 1 cup of simple syrup to the warm cannabis oil mixture, stirring vigorously to incorporate the oil mixture into the syrup.
  8. Heat the syrup to 160º F. Using a wet pastry brush to keep sides free of crystals, keep an eye on the mixture and stir with a very clean whisk periodically to break up the foam. This is the most difficult step, as it can take up to 3 hours for the oil to be fully dissolved. Patience and low heat are key to the success of this emulsion while avoiding the further decarboxylation of the cannabis oil.
  9. When the oil has dissipated to a sheen of droplets, remove the syrup from the heat and cool slightly before stirring. Stir vigorously and steadily with a clean whisk.
  10. Pour the now infused-syrup into an air-tight container. (Tip: Use a spatula to ensure you fully scrape the sides of all the infused goodness.)
  11. Label clearly, and store up to one week in a dark, cool place. If the infused syrup does separate or crystallize, don’t worry, it can easily be mixed up again by simply stirring, and can be reheated gently, as needed.

Dosage: If your BHO potency is 70 percent THC (700 mg), one half-gram would then contain around 350 mg THC. With 16 tablespoons in each cup of infused syrup, a single tablespoon would contain approximately 22 mg of THC.

Three Cannabis-Infused Mocktail Recipes

Cannabis-Infused Rosemary Cucumber Ginger Beer

Rosemary, Cucumber & Cannabis Ginger Beer Recipe

INGREDIENTS:

1 liter (4 cups) of ginger beer
1/2 cup cannabis-infused lemon simple syrup
1 cucumber, sliced
2 sprigs of rosemary, slightly crushed
Ice, extra rosemary sprigs and a fresh cannabis fan leaf for garnish, if available

makes 4 servings at a 44 mg dose per mocktail

DIRECTIONS:

  1. Add all the ingredients into a jug and stir.
  2. Cover and refrigerate for between 2-4 hours.
  3. Serve over ice, and garnish with extra rosemary sprigs and a fan leaf or two. Share and enjoy!

 

Cannabis-Infused Mojito Mocktail

Cannabis-Infused Mojito Mocktail Recipe

INGREDIENTS:

5-6 mint leaves
2 tbsp fresh lime juice (juice from approximately half of a medium/large lime)
2 tbsp cannabis-infused lemon simple syrup
½ cup ice
1/2 cup club soda or sparkling mineral water

makes 1 serving at a 44 mg dose

DIRECTIONS:

  1. Muddle 3 of the mint leaves and the lime juice in the bottom of your glass.
  2. Add 2 tablespoons canna-infused lemon simple syrup, the club soda or sparkling water, and the rest of the mint leaves.
  3. Stir to mix thoroughly. Add ice and enjoy!

Thai Basil and Lime Cannabis-Infused Mocktail

Thai Basil & Lime Cannabis-Infused Mocktail Recipe

INGREDIENTS:

1/2 lime, sliced into 4 lime wedges
A small handful of fresh Thai basil
2 tablespoons cannabis-infused lemon simple syrup
1 cup club soda or sparkling water, plus more to top off
1 cup ice
Lemongrass stalks, trimmed (optional, to use as stir sticks)
Cannabis leaves for garnish, if available

makes 2 servings at a 22 mg dose per mocktail

DIRECTIONS:

  1. Muddle the basil with the lemon cannabis simple syrup in a serving glass.
  2. Add the club soda or sparkling water, and stir until well mixed.
  3. Add the ice and lemongrass stalks. Top off with club soda or sparkling water and a slice of lime. Share and enjoy!

The post Make These Delicious Cannabis-Infused Mocktail Recipes At Home appeared first on Cannabis Now.

Smart And Legal Strategies That Will Help You Win At Online Casinos

For all its benefits, online gambling also poses several challenges that may affect your odds of winning. Perhaps the biggest one is the fact that you are not in the same room as other players, which makes it harder to read and call out their bluffs. Below are six effective tips that can help you […]

The post Smart And Legal Strategies That Will Help You Win At Online Casinos appeared first on Latest Cannabis News Today – Headlines, Videos & Stocks.

Wednesday April 14, 2021 Headlines | Marijuana Today Daily News

Marijuana Today Daily Headlines
Wednesday, April 14, 2021 | Curated by host Shea Gunther

// Longtime cannabis reform activist Steve Fox dies (Marijuana Business Daily)

** GoFundMe- Support the family of Steve Fox. **

// Biden picks former New Jersey attorney general to lead DEA (Washington Post)

// Illinois Gets More Tax Revenue From Marijuana Than Alcohol State Says (Marijuana Moment)


These headlines are brought to you by Agilent, a Fortune 500 company known for providing top-notch testing solutions to cannabis and hemp testing labs worldwide. Are you considering testing your cannabis in-house for potency? Agilent is giving away a FREE 1260 HPLC system for one year! If you are a Cultivator, processor, or cannabis testing lab you may qualify for this giveaway. Open up bitly.com/cannabis-contest to answer a few quick questions to enter to win!


// Medical Cannabis in Mississippi Faces Constitutional Challenge (Bloomberg Government)

// NJ Cannabis Commission Gets Going Picks Vice Chair Logo (NBC 4 New York)

// urban-gro Pre-Announces Q1 Revenue in Excess of $11.8 Million (New Cannabis Ventures)

// Aphria Stock Slammed On Dismal Third Quarter (Green Market Report)

// Organigram Q2 Revenue Slides 24% Sequentially to C$14.6 Million (New Cannabis Ventures)

// Colorado Marijuana Sales Reached $167 Million In February (Marijuana Moment (Center Square))

// Minnesota Marijuana Legalization Bill Sails Through Fifth Committee, With Floor Vote Expected Next Month (Marijuana Moment)

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Photo: Boston Globe

Cannabis Wine -Everything You Need To Know

You either hate it, have never heard of it, or can’t wait to try it, but by now you might have heard of weed wine. While the cannabis craze isn’t necessarily new, thanks to new technology, cannabis-infused wine has had some upgrades recently. In other words, thankfully the cannabis wine doesn’t taste like bong water […]

The post Cannabis Wine -Everything You Need To Know appeared first on Latest Cannabis News Today – Headlines, Videos & Stocks.